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Point of View Point of View. The point of view in a work of literature is determined by the narrator, that is, the person telling the story. This narrator.

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Presentation on theme: "Point of View Point of View. The point of view in a work of literature is determined by the narrator, that is, the person telling the story. This narrator."— Presentation transcript:

1 Point of View Point of View

2 The point of view in a work of literature is determined by the narrator, that is, the person telling the story. This narrator may be the author or a character in the story, book, play, or poem.

3 First Person If the narrator is a character in the story, this is first person point of view. One way to recognize this is the use of the pronoun “I” by the narrator. This is similar to hearing a person tell you about what happened to them personally, or what they saw happen first hand.

4 Third person If the author or narrator is telling the story, this is known as third person point of view. What are some pronouns that will show third person point of view? he, she, they, them There are two types of third person points of view. Limited Omniscient

5 Third Person Limited If the author relates the events of the story from the perspective of only one character, this is known as third person limited point of view. The reader can see into the mind of only one person. Thoughts of 1 character= limited

6 Third Person Omniscient If the author relates the events of the story from the perspective of several characters, this is known as third person omniscient point of view. The reader is privy to the thoughts of several, or even all, of the characters. Thoughts of several/all characters= omniscient

7 You decide… Read the following excerpts. Decide which point of view is used in each. Be able to provide 2 examples of evidence for your decision.

8 EXAMPLE A Mr. Johnson looked at Charles sternly. He simply didn’t know what to do with this boy. Charles had been in Mr. Johnson’s office twice earlier this week. Now here he was again, and this time he was charged with something much more serious. Mr. Johnson shook his head. There really was no doubt in his mind. Charles was guilty. He looked at the police officer standing next to Charles. No question whatsoever-- Charles had done it.

9 EXAMPLE A Mr. Johnson looked at Charles sternly. He simply didn’t know what to do with this boy. Charles had been in Mr. Johnson’s office twice earlier this week. Now here he was again, and this time he was charged with something much more serious. Mr. Johnson shook his head. There really was no doubt in his mind. Charles was guilty. He looked at the police officer standing next to Charles. No question whatsoever-- Charles had done it.

10 Which point of view? Excerpt A was Third Person Limited. The author, not a character, is telling the story. We can see only what Mr. Johnson is thinking. We know what Mr. Johnson thinks, but we do not know what the officer or Charles thinks. We also do not know whether or not Charles is really guilty.

11 Example B I can’t believe what is happening to me. I know that I’ll never convince Mr. Johnson and the cop that I had nothing to do with this. Man! I didn’t do it. Why won’t anyone believe me? I’ve been in trouble before, but I’ve never done anything like this! I’ve got to convince them, or I might as well kiss my life good-bye.

12 Example B I can’t believe what is happening to me. I know that I’ll never convince Mr. Johnson and the cop that I had nothing to do with this. Man! I didn’t do it. Why won’t anyone believe me? I’ve been in trouble before, but I’ve never done anything like this! I’ve got to convince them, or I might as well kiss my life good-bye.

13 Which point of view? Excerpt B is an example of First Person Point of View. Charles, a character in the story, is telling us what happened to him. We know that Charles is innocent.

14 Example C Officer Wiley looked at Charles and scratched his head. All the evidence pointed to Charles’s guilt, but the officer just couldn’t be sure. Mr. Johnson, on the other hand, knew that Charles was guilty as sin. His numerous brushes with authority in the past left no question in his mind at all. Charles hung his head, knowing that this time he would not be able to talk his way out of trouble.

15 Example C Officer Wiley looked at Charles and scratched his head. All the evidence pointed to Charles’s guilt, but the officer just couldn’t be sure. Mr. Johnson, on the other hand, knew that Charles was guilty as sin. His numerous brushes with authority in the past left no question in his mind at all. Charles hung his head, knowing that this time he would not be able to talk his way out of trouble.

16 Which point of view? Excerpt C is an example of Third Person Omniscient Point of View. The author is telling the story, but we can see what Officer Wiley, Charles, and Mr. Johnson are thinking. We know that Mr. Johnson believes Charles is guilty, but Officer Wiley has doubts. We still are not sure whether or not Charles is guilty.

17 Example D When I saw them taking Charlie into the office, I lingered outside the door, hoping to find out what he had done this time. Charlie was my best friend, but I was getting a little tired of defending him when I knew he was wrong. He must have done something really big this time to have the cops involved.

18 Example D When I saw them taking Charlie into the office, I lingered outside the door, hoping to find out what he had done this time. Charlie was my best friend, but I was getting a little tired of defending him when I knew he was wrong. He must have done something really big this time to have the cops involved.

19 Which point of view? Excerpt D is an example of First Person Point of View. A friend, one of the characters in the story, is narrating. Since he does not know whether or not Charles is guilty, neither do we.

20 Example E You kick off your shoes and flop onto the bed—landing, of course, among millions of mites. Had you any inkling that your bedding was alive with arthropodic bugs, chomping away on flakes of your dead skin, you would be so disgusted you would probably choose to lie on the floor. Yet every one of us, including the rich, the pious, and the royal of blood, sleeps each night in colonies of such mites.

21 Example E You kick off your shoes and flop onto the bed—landing, of course, among millions of mites. Had you any inkling that your bedding was alive with arthropodic bugs, chomping away on flakes of your dead skin, you would be so disgusted you would probably choose to lie on the floor. Yet every one of us, including the rich, the pious, and the royal of blood, sleeps each night in colonies of such mites.

22 Which point of view? Excerpt E is an example of Second Person Point of View. The narrator is telling a story directly to another character. The reader may be confused and believe the narrator is talking to them.


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