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T.G.I.F. Store 1.Have your HOOT LOOT ready to spend. 2.The T.G.I.F. Store will open when the warning bells sounds. 3.You will not be allowed to spend.

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Presentation on theme: "T.G.I.F. Store 1.Have your HOOT LOOT ready to spend. 2.The T.G.I.F. Store will open when the warning bells sounds. 3.You will not be allowed to spend."— Presentation transcript:

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2 T.G.I.F. Store 1.Have your HOOT LOOT ready to spend. 2.The T.G.I.F. Store will open when the warning bells sounds. 3.You will not be allowed to spend unless you are sitting, materials ready on your desk. RWN on your desk READING LOG

3 Friday, October 25, 2013 Friday Trivia Instructions: YOU DO NOT HAVE TO WRITE ANYTHING, JUST THINK. PLEASE, DO NOT SHOUT THE ANSWER OR SHARE THE ANSWER!!

4 Poetry VS. Short Story A short story is to _phone call as a poem to it a text message. Melissa, RUOK? :-|| Y PAL school

5 Exploration helps us understand our world…poetry 1.Draft your Choices essay in Draft Section RWN ( , not complete) 2.Practice SPLATT- Add ONE LITERARY DEVICE to your Choices essay. 3.Write on the BIG paint splatt- create a silly simile or a monstrous metaphor. Choices Essay Text Structure below:

6 SPLATT a strategy for poetry analysis

7 SPLATT: S – speaker BLUE P – purpose PURPLE L – literary devices RED A – and BLACK T – theme ORANGE T – tone GREEN

8 Splatt, gives the reader direction for the analysis of the poem.

9 S – speaker In addition to identifying who the speaker is, you are also identifying the way the author expresses their opinion and emotion in their poem. For Sale One sister for sale! One crying and spying young sister for sale! I’m really not kidding, So who’ll start the bidding? Do I hear the dollar? A nickel? A penny? Oh, isn’t there, isn’t there, isn’t there any One kid that will buy this old sister for sale, This crying and spying young sister for sale? Eighteen Flavors By Shel Silverstein Eighteen luscious, scrumptious flavors Chocolate, lime and cherry, Coffee, pumpkin, fudge banana Caramel cream and boysenberry. Rocky road and toasted almond, Butterscotch, vanilla dip, Butter brickle, apple ripple, Coconut and mocha chip, Brandy peach and lemon custard, Each scoop lovely, smooth and round, Tallest ice cream cone in town, Lying there (sniff) on the ground.

10 P - purpose Just like personal narratives, the reader still needs to determine the purpose of the writing. Poetry has a purpose just like any other written work. The Boa Constrictor Song I'm being swallered by a Boa Constrictor a Boa Constrictor, a Boa Constrictor I'm being swallered by a Boa Constrictor and I don't - like snakes - one bit! Oh no, he swallered my toe. Oh gee, he swallered my knee. Oh fiddle, he swallered my middle. Oh what a pest, he swallered my chest. Oh heck, he swallered my neck. Oh, dread, he swallered my - (BURP) Green and speckled legs, Hop on logs and lily pads Splash in cool water.

11 L – Literary Devices Poetry uses literary devices to develop the mood and tone of the poem. They help the reader understand the emotion, importance, and event within the poem. KABOOM! by Denise Rodgers Kaboom! Ka-blast Way in the past the miners mined for ore. They searched for copper, iron and salt, for that and much, much more. Kaboom! The bite of dynamite cut deep inside the earth. The charge explodes revealing lodes of minerals of worth. Kaboom! The dust, the air so mussed went swirling through the sky. It was a sight, the dynamite that made the mountains fly. Kaboom! The earth was filled with mirth so tickled by the boom. The miner's pleasure, each newfound treasure that followed each Kaboom! Crazy Words People play poker in a place called Pop's While tigers go tramping on tree tops Kids practice canning, with Kathy and Claire As Harold and Helen have fun with their hair Eat Wisely Franks and fries, and French fondue Beans and burgers and biscuits too Chicken, chili, and cheddar cheese When I munch too much, I always sneeze! Poetry by Alan Loren Figurative Language Types

12 Similes  Compares two unlike things that have something in common.  Uses “like” or “as” to compare the two things. Example: Her eyes were like two bright, yellow stars, shining in the sky.

13 Metaphors  Compares two unlike things that have something in common, NOT using like or as, often using a form of the BE verb (is, am, are, was, were) Example: His hair was a springy mass of corkscrews.

14 Personification  Gives human characteristics to something that is not human; physical or emotional action.  Poets use this to make objects seem like they are alive. Example: The mountains dared me to try their treacherous slopes.

15 Personification  There are 2 ways to use personification: 1. Describes an object using a human emotion. Example: When the lights went out, darkness invaded the room. 2. Describes an object using human action. Example: The sun glared at us wickedly.

16 Alliteration  Consonant sounds that are repeated at the beginning of two or more words. Example: With a wild whoop, the warriors charged.

17 Onomatopoeia  Words that imitate sounds. Examples: Cars zipped past with engines roaring.

18 Idioms  An expression where the words together have a meaning that is different from the dictionary definitions of the individual words.

19 Analogies  a similarity between like features of two things, on which a comparison may be based

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21 T – theme Theme is the main idea of a story, poem, novel, or drama. Theme is the message about life or human nature the writer wants to convey. Theme of this poem: a father who sometimes forgets that his son has become a grown-up. Sentimental Moment or Why Did the Baguette Cross the Road? Robert Hershon Don't fill up on bread I say absent-mindedly The servings here are huge My son, whose hair may be receding a bit, says Did you really just say that to me? What he doesn't know is that when we're walking together, when we get to the curb I sometimes start to reach for his hand

22 T – tone Tone describes the author’s attitude toward his subject. Tone reflects the author’s purpose. If the author’s purpose is to inform, the tone may be serious. If the author’s purpose is to entertain, the tone may be humorous. Tone is not stated directly. Tone must be inferred from clues in the writing. The language and details the writer chooses help create the tone. Tone refers to the feelings of the writer. "To My Dear and Loving Husband" by Anne Bradstreet If ever two were one, then surely we. If ever man were loved by wife, then thee; If ever wife was happy in a man, Compare with me, ye women, if you can. I prize thy love more than whole mines of gold Or all the riches that the East doth hold. My love is such that rivers cannot quench, Nor ought but love from thee, give recompense. Thy love is such I can no way repay, The heavens reward thee manifold, I pray. Then while we live, in love let's so persevere That when we live no more, we may live ever.

23 Exploration helps us understand our world…poetry 1.Draft your Choices essay in Draft Section RWN ( , not complete) 2.Practice SPLATT- Add ONE LITERARY DEVICE to your Choices essay. 3.Write on the BIG paint splatt- create a silly simile or a monstrous metaphor. Choices Essay Text Structure below:


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