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It is impossible to say from this cross sectional study whether we are seeing the effect of self- selection or something else. The curriculum encountered.

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Presentation on theme: "It is impossible to say from this cross sectional study whether we are seeing the effect of self- selection or something else. The curriculum encountered."— Presentation transcript:

1 It is impossible to say from this cross sectional study whether we are seeing the effect of self- selection or something else. The curriculum encountered in business schools tends to reinforce existing stereotypes about business and businesspersons, and does not include much of a multicultural perspective. Exposure to the curriculum may have an effect on students over time; viewing depictions of business professionals has been shown to affect readers’ attitudes towards the people portrayed. An unsolicited e-mail from one of the study participants, a student who grew up in Hawaii, illustrates the perceived dichotomy between Hawaiian culture and business: “We took that survey today and only now i could articulate what… the problem was with the Hawaiian style missions (sic) statement… the real problem is that Hawaiian culture and the business world are too different…Hawai‘i isn't about business. nobody comes to Hawai‘i for the competition or a edge…it would be fine to try and convey how business could be beneficial to Hawaiian culture, but not vice versa. you can't make something its not. we can try but we can only get close. That [Hawaiian values] missions statement seemed artificial because it was, it was too far of stretch and in the business world we know false advertisement to be untrustworthy.. E. de Pillis 1, B. Kim 1, C. Thomas 2, G. Kaulukukui 3 1 University of Hawaii-Hilo, Hilo, HI 2 Teleos Leadership Institute, Elkins Park, PA 3 Bio-Logical Capital, Honolulu, HI You can't make something it's not: Hawaiian discourse and perceived leadership INTRODUCTION Educators often assume that students will respond positively when we “speak their language.” In the present study, we examined the effect of reframing educational literature in the speech style and values of the indigenous population. The present study began under the auspices of a grant intended to help faculty tailor curriculum to local and Hawaiian students. While professors from non-business disciplines reported enthusiastic student response, students in the College of Business and Economics reacted with indifference, at best. They did not seem to respond positively to attempts to “speak their language,” and there seemed to be little interest in incorporating Hawaiian values or customs into their management education or their study of leadership. In the present study, we undertook a systematic investigation of this phenomenon. METHODS The Matched Guise Technique (MGT) involves using participants as judges; these judges evaluate a text presented in two different languages or dialects. The two versions of the text are matched in terms of content. The resulting differences in attitudes can then be attributed to attitudes about the language varieties themselves, which are projected by participant/judges onto the person of the individual who produces the text. Participants were 157 male and 241 female undergraduates. 91 were in the College of Business and Economics, 52 were majoring in kinesiology, and 48 were psychology majors. Other majors included nursing (37) and natural sciences (21). 100 identified as part Native Hawaiian. Participants read two statements about business leadership, one that was framed in terms of Hawaiian values, and one that was not. The participants then rated the hypothetical leaders on attributes such as credibility and perceived effectiveness. In addition, participants recorded demographic information and completed measures of personality and collectivism. RESULTS from Matthews, J., Dennis, J., & Economy, P. (2003). Lessons from the Edge: Survival Skills for Starting and Growing a Company. New York: Oxford University pp. 32-33 We found that business students were significantly less likely to select a hypothetical business leader who articulated Hawaiian values. Business majors demonstrated a lower level of respect, trust and liking for this leader compared to a hypothetical leader articulating Western values. Having grown up in Hawaii or having Hawaiian ancestry did not have a significant effect. We did not observe a preference for Western discourse among students not majoring in business. DISCUSSION For further information, please contact Emmeline de Pillis (depillis@hawaii.edu) Most first time entrepreneurs give little attention to issues such as culture, mission, vision, and values, yet these elements are major responsibilities of the leader. Successful entrepreneurs understand the importance of culture and values. A well defined company culture and a clearly articulated set of values and ethical standards will guide company operations and decision making at all levels of the company. Culture and values start early. Don’t just hire people who can perform their jobs; make sure they are also a good match with the values and the culture of the company. Building a culture begins with communicating the CEO’s own beliefs and linking them to the company’s mission and vision. Regular communication of a clear consistent message is essential for a growing company. Culture, mission, vision, and values are major responsibilities of a leader that are often overlooked by most first time entrepreneurs. The importance of traditional knowledge and practices based on cultural values has been recognized by successful entrepreneurs. A company culture that honors the past, a set of values and ethical guidelines derived from an understanding of the importance of man’s relationship to the land, and acknowledging a spiritual component to decision making will guide the operations throughout the company. The family, especially the extended family, is the mechanism for the transfer of cultural practices and values through the generations. These concepts become part of our “psychic DNA”, so it is important that we hire people who not only are competent at doing their jobs but do it in a way that is consistent with the culture and values of the company. HAWAIIAN VALUES TEXT- “Candidate 2” WESTERN TEXT- “Candidate 1” Which candidate will you recommend? adapted from the “Western” statement by a Hawaiian leadership scholar Logical & rational Credible Likeable Effective leader Candidate 1 Non-NH NH Candidate 1 Non-NH NH Candidate 1 Non-NH NH Candidate 1 Non-NH NH Recommend Candidate 2 Non-NH NH Recommend Candidate 1 Neutral Candidate 2 Non-NH NH Candidate 2 Non-NH NH Candidate 2 Non-NH NH Candidate 2 Non-NH NH Correlations


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