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Julie Gillespie, Ottawa Area ISD Rich Zuker, Holland Public Schools.

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Presentation on theme: "Julie Gillespie, Ottawa Area ISD Rich Zuker, Holland Public Schools."— Presentation transcript:

1 Julie Gillespie, Ottawa Area ISD Rich Zuker, Holland Public Schools

2 Typical Performance Feedback  Relished by few…..dreaded by most…..  Can be uncomfortable for both parties  Is very often avoided  Or, if conducted, is so brief as to be meaningless (video clip) meaningful feedback  Most performance reviews are relatively ineffective in providing meaningful feedback feedback  Remember…feedback is the breakfast of champions (One Minute Manager)

3 Conversation = Transformation “When you think of a fierce conversation, think passion, integrity, authenticity, collaboration…..think cultural transformation. Think of leadership.” Susan Scott Fierce Conversations

4 Defining Fierce Conversations  The word “fierce” has a number of synonyms including robust, intense, strong, passionate, and eager  A fierce conversation should not be menacing, cruel or threatening fierce conversation  A fierce conversation is one in which we come out from behind ourselves into the conversation and make it real... Author, Susan Scott (thankfully not related to Michael Scott)

5 Guiding Principles  Master the Courage to Interrogate Reality  Come out from Behind Yourself Into the Conversation and Make it Real  Be here…prepared to be nowhere else  Tackle Your Toughest Challenge Today  Obey Your Instincts  Take Responsibility for Your Emotional Wake  Let Silence do the Heavy Lifting

6 Conversation=Relationship=Leadership Conversations are our leadership.  Choices: Interrogate reality or pretend not to know what we know Confront performance issues or avoid the risky discomfort of putting our vision out there  We effect change and help people grow by engaging in robust conversations with ourselves and others Difficult and vitally important As a leader, you get what you tolerate.

7 Purpose of the Conversation People need to know what their leader expects of them Provoke learning Enrich relationships Success scare us to death. While it may be the real conversation that we are afraid of, it is the unreal conversation that should scare us to death.

8 The Anatomy of the Conversation Three phases: Opening statement: Homework – Practice – 60 Seconds 1. Name the issue “I’d like to talk with you about time on task for students in your classroom.” 2. Select an illustrative example “I’ve noticed during a some recent visits to your classroom that students do not seem to know what to do when they enter your classroom or finish a task early.” 3. Describe your emotions “I’m concerned that there is a significant amount of time lost which could be used for instruction.” Most people want to hear the truth even if it is unpalatable.

9 The Anatomy of the Conversation Three phases continued: 4. Clarify what is at stake “You have a high needs student population whose performance on common assessments and Terra Nova has not been good Soon they will be taking the MEAP.” 5. Identify your contribution to the problem “I’ve contributed to this problem by not saying something sooner. For that, I apologize.” 6. Indicate your desire to resolve the issue “I want to maximize time-on-task for all of your students.” 7. Invite your partner to respond “I need to understand your thinking about transitions.” Improving employee performance……one conversation at a time.

10 The Anatomy of the Conversation Three phases: Interaction: The bulk of the conversation happens here 8. Inquire into your partner’s view Ask questions and dig for understanding. Resolution 9. What have we learned? “How can we move forward form here given our new reality or our new understanding? 10. Make an agreement Determine how you will hold one another accountable to keep it. If you know something must change… know that it is you who must change it.

11 Potential Landmines  Blaming  Name calling or labeling  Using sarcasm  Attaching weight to the tip-of-the-iceberg  Threatening, intimidating  Exaggerating  Pointing to someone else’s failure  Saying, “If I were you…”  Bringing up a lot of old baggage  Assassinating someone in public  Asking, “Why did you do that?” instead of “What were you trying to do?”  Making blatantly negative facial expressions  Layering my interpretation on something someone has said or done; ascribing negative or false motives  Being unresponsive or refusing to speak

12 Putting Principles into Practice first year  You are in your first year directing Human Resources. have not placed a high priority on evaluating certified staff.  Your Principals and Building Administrators have not placed a high priority on evaluating certified staff. High School Principal has not evaluated a teacher or support staff member for at least the past five years.  You are finding that the High School Principal, who has been with the District for 21 years has not evaluated a teacher or support staff member for at least the past five years. you are hearing that nothing is changing at the High School.  Though you have provided presentations on the new legislation and lists of teachers to be evaluated, you are hearing that nothing is changing at the High School. three minutes Take three minutes to prepare your opening statement that you would have when you initiate the Conversation that needs to take place. Share your statement with another person at your table.

13 Putting Principles into Practice has been in the district sixteen years Mr. Barney has been in the district sixteen years and is a very popular teacher. built a reputation for being the teacher of Honors and AP level courses, as well as for his humor. He has built a reputation for being the teacher of Honors and AP level courses, as well as for his humor. insists that the students at this level need to be treated like adults. He insists that the students at this level need to be treated like adults. eight parents from a new Honors course complained that Mr. Barney’s sarcasm and cutting wit has demeaned and belittled their children. Over the past six weeks, eight parents from a new Honors course complained that Mr. Barney’s sarcasm and cutting wit has demeaned and belittled their children. he dismissed that as an overly sensitive, disgruntled lower achiever. You shared with Mr. Barney one complaint of this nature last year but it seems that he dismissed that as an overly sensitive, disgruntled lower achiever. What will you do now in response to these complaints? Take three minutes to prepare your opening statement that you would have when you initiate the Conversation that needs to take place. Share your statement with another person at your table.

14 Wrap Up & Questions Remember…  Fierce conversations are necessary and important  Talk with people, not at them  Feedback isn’t fatal


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