Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Welcome to the Woodrow Wilson High School Supported by the Humanities Council of Washington, D.C., the Wilson PTSO, and the Wilson Alumni Association Digital.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Welcome to the Woodrow Wilson High School Supported by the Humanities Council of Washington, D.C., the Wilson PTSO, and the Wilson Alumni Association Digital."— Presentation transcript:

1 Welcome to the Woodrow Wilson High School Supported by the Humanities Council of Washington, D.C., the Wilson PTSO, and the Wilson Alumni Association Digital Archives Project

2 Our Digital Archives Project preserves materials from our school’s beginning in 1935.

3 What’s in our Digital Archives? Articles and photos from The Beacon student newspaper, which dates back to 1935 Pages from school scrapbooks, including photos, newspaper clippings, and event programs Yearbooks Class photos And much more...

4 The Digital Archives Project’s Goals To preserve our archives, including many items that are fragile, such as the original Beacon student newspapers. To scan, digitize, and organize the materials for easy access. To make the archives accessible to students, teachers, the public, and cultural organizations.

5 A History of the Wilson Digital Archives Project As Wilson High School packs for renovation, librarian and Wilson alumna Pamela Gardner finds two cabinets filled with old scrapbooks, pictures, and newspapers collected by Wilson librarians over the years. She also rescues the library’s collection of yearbooks, bound Beacon student newspapers, photos, and class pictures. “STOP! Don’t throw that away. One day we will properly archive it.”

6 History (continued) While organizing the library storage room in the new building, Lena Frumin, Wilson parent and then-library assistant, asks Ms. Gardner about the many boxes labeled “Alumni.” “If only I had the time and resources to build a proper archive...” “I’ll post to our listserv and find parents who will help.”

7 History (continued) “I’ll find out who might give grants for this project and write the proposal.” “I have great memories of my years at Wilson— I’ll join the committee.” And so the Digital Archives Project Committee is formed, comprised of current and former Wilson parents and Wilson alumni, each of whom brings specific and useful expertise to the project. “Helping Wilson preserve its history is something I’d love to be involved in.” “I can help—I work in the archiving field.”

8 Digital Archives Project Committee Members John Libby, Wilson Class of 1976 Pamela Lipscomb-Gardner, Project Director Wilson Class of 1973 Mary White Giffin, Wilson Class of 1973 Arlene Balkansky, Humanities Scholar Tina Kaneen Elizabeth Levenson Lena Frumin

9 The Digital Archives Project Website

10 The Digital Archives Project uses a museum-grade software program called PastPerfect, which is designed to store archives, catalog them, and make them accessible.

11 Sample Titles from Our Two Pilot Collections Wilson Girls Athletics “Girls Swim Club Boasts 125 Members” Washington Herald article in 1938 scrapbook Wilson girls earn Red Cross swim certificates. “Girls Sports Range from Basketball to Field Hockey” 1969 yearbook Girls sports in 1969: intramurals, gym classes, and interscholastic tournaments. “City Volleyball Champions Again” The Beacon, December 1986 Girls volleyball team has 9-1 season and wins the interhigh championship. “Neighs of Steeds Lure Equestrians” The Beacon, February 1965 Wilson girls who train and show horses as an extracurricular activity. “Coed Gymnastics Team” 1951 yearbook Photo of boy and girl gymnasts. “Girls Jumping Rope in P.E.” 1937 scrapbook Photo of girls in gym uniforms.

12 Wilson girls athletics in 1938...... and 2003.

13 Wilson in Wartime “Jeepers! We’ve Bought a Jeep!” The Beacon, March 5, 1942 Fund drive for WWII. “Stop the War–Out Now” 1972 yearbook Vietnam War protest. “Iran Crisis Hits Wilson” The Beacon, April 1980 Two Wilson students, children of Iranian diplomats, expelled from the U.S. after Iran seizes the U.S. Embassy in Tehran. “Help Uncle Sam, Girls” The Beacon, December 9, 1942 Editorial urging girls to get involved. “War Is Not the Answer” The Beacon, October 1, 2001 Editorial responding to 9/11. “Talking It Over: Student Views on H-Bomb Testing” 1956 Scrapbook Teen column in local newspaper presents views of Wilson seniors.

14 How Wilson students reacted to war in 1941...... and 1972.

15 The Humanities Council of Washington, D.C., and in particular Mark Smith, Director of Grants and Special Projects The D.C. Community Heritage Project, a partnership between the Humanities Council and the D.C. Historic Preservation Office The Woodrow Wilson Alumni Association The Woodrow Wilson Parent Teacher Student Organization Alexandra Stryker, Wilson teacher, for the use of the scanner Acknowledgements We would like to thank the organizations and individuals that helped make the Digital Archives Project possible:

16 Interested in helping with the Wilson Digital Archives Project? We need... Volunteers to help with scanning, cataloging, and seeking follow-up grant money to support the full archiving of the collection. Grant writing or financial support to cover items such as the annual software and support fees or specialized scanning for delicate and large-format items. Contact Lena Frumin, Wilson’s Communications Director, at lena.frumin@dc.gov


Download ppt "Welcome to the Woodrow Wilson High School Supported by the Humanities Council of Washington, D.C., the Wilson PTSO, and the Wilson Alumni Association Digital."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google