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KAAC Maximizing Impact on Student Learning Sue A. Davis and Trish Carroll Above All – Know Your Impact! Bell Ringer What IMPACT do your behaviors have.

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Presentation on theme: "KAAC Maximizing Impact on Student Learning Sue A. Davis and Trish Carroll Above All – Know Your Impact! Bell Ringer What IMPACT do your behaviors have."— Presentation transcript:

1 KAAC Maximizing Impact on Student Learning Sue A. Davis and Trish Carroll Above All – Know Your Impact! Bell Ringer What IMPACT do your behaviors have on student learning? What IMPACT do your behaviors have on a single student’s learning? Do you have any impact at all?

2 KAAC – Maximizing Impact on Student Learning Session MA4 Segell Room Sue A. Davis Trish Carroll Leadership Consultants

3 “I think what happens to us as educators is that we perceive our role as implementing the curriculum planning and delivering lessons and making sure the education we’re offering meets the needs of kids. What we don’t say is “we had an impact on them and their learning.’” “If I give you an incredibly difficult task to do, at some point very soon on you’re going to need some guidance and help. You’re going to need me to get involved and say something such as, “Don’t go that way; go this way.” And so instead of taking on the role as facilitator, teachers need to see themselves as change agents – the teacher’s role is to effect change. “ “I’m at the stage now where I don’t want to talk about teaching anymore – not because it isn’t important but because it often keeps us from having important discussions about learning. In teachers’ colleges where the emphasis is on teaching – they say, here’s a good way to teach and here’s how you teach this concept and this is what you do when this doesn’t happen, and so on.” “With the emphasis on evaluation of impact as the teacher’s mindset, the fundamental reason for administering assessments in the classroom is to find out what you as the teacher did well – who did you teach well and who not so well, what did you teach well and what not so well, and so on. “ “This model of teaching requires monologue with constant focus on the teacher. Another approach is to give a task to complete. You do it and if you don’t do it the way I hoped, we’ll talk about it and I’ll come up with another approach and give you another go at it. The emphasis in dialogue is active listening by the teacher to how students are learning. “ “The purpose of schools is to help students exceed their potential and do more than they thought they could do. To find out what students can do, and help them do better. And that’s a challenge. We should never accept a student’s best. It’s okay. But it’s a springboard to doing even better. “ 6 “If I put up my hand, as a student in a classroom, and say, “Look I’m having trouble; I don’t understand,” then I am taking the risk that my fellow students will say, “Oh, there he goes…he doesn’t understand.” That’s why trust and positive relationships are so critical. “ 7 “We learned that parents didn’t understand what happens in schools – and this is still the case with many parents today. They don’t understand the language of learning and they don’t understand what is involved in learning today. They don’t know how to talk with their children about their learning or with teachers about their children’s learning.” 8 8 Mind Frames from John Hattie

4 KAAC Maximizing Impact on Student Learning Sue A. Davis and Trish Carroll We must cultivate the disposition to asking questions about our work…  How can I compare ‘this’ with ‘that’?  What is the merit and worth of this influence on learning? Mind Frame 1 Teachers and leaders serve as evaluators of their impact. TPGES, Domain 1, “Planning and Preparation” a.Demonstrating Knowledge of Content and Pedagogy c.Selecting Instructional Outcome Domain 4, “Professional Responsibility” a.Reflecting on Teaching b.Growing and Developing

5 KAAC Maximizing Impact on Student Learning Sue A. Davis and Trish Carroll Don’t blame the kids!!  Social class and low prior achievement are surmountable.  All students can be challenged.  We can develop high student expectations. Mind Frame 2 Teachers and leaders take responsibility for students’ success and failure. TPGES, Domain 2, “Classroom Environment” a. Creating an Environment of Respect and Rapport b.Establishing a Culture for Learning Domain 1, “Planning and Preparation” a.Selecting Instructional Outcome Domain 3, “Instruction” a.Communicating with Students c.Engaging Students in Learning

6 KAAC Maximizing Impact on Student Learning Sue A. Davis and Trish Carroll  Live the growth mind-set.  Look at students as individuals who can change and grow.  Teaching is perceived as an enabler not a barrier.  Employ the power of success criteria. Mind Frame 3 “Learning,” not just “teaching,” should guide professional conversations. TPGES, Domain 2, “Classroom Environment” c.Managing Classroom Procedures Domain 3, “Instruction” d.Using Assessment in Instruction Doman 4, “Professional Responsibilities” f.Demonstrating Professionalism

7 KAAC Maximizing Impact on Student Learning Sue A. Davis and Trish Carroll  Feedback is information provided by a teacher, peer, book, parent, or self/experience about one’s performance.  Who did you teach well and who not so well?  What did you teach well and not so well? Mind Frame 4 Teachers and leaders see assessment as feedback about their impact on student learning. TPGES, Doman 3, “Instruction” d.Using assessment in instruction e.Demonstrating Flexibility and Responsiveness Domain 4, “Professional Responsibility” a.Reflecting on Teaching b.Growing and Developing

8 KAAC Maximizing Impact on Student Learning Sue A. Davis and Trish Carroll  Eighty percent of the “talking” in most classrooms is done by teachers.  Teachers should LISTEN to students’ questions, ideas, struggles, strategies for learning, their success, their interactions with peers, etc. Mind Frame 5 Educators engage in dialogue and not just monologue. TPGES, Domain 1, “Planning and Preparation” e.Designing Coherent Instruction Domain 2, “Classroom Environment” c.Managing Classroom Procedures Domain 3, “Instruction” a.Communicating with Students

9 KAAC Maximizing Impact on Student Learning Sue A. Davis and Trish Carroll  The teacher’s role is to engage the student in the challenge by pushing toward greater learning.  “Do your best” is a cop-out phrase.  There is a power in clear success criteria. Mind Frame 6 We must “challenge” students rather than ask them to do their best. TPGES, Domain 1, “Planning and Preparation” e.Designing Coherent Instruction f.Designing Student Assessment Domain 3, “Instruction” b.Using Questioning and Discussion Techniques c.Using Assessment in Instruction

10 KAAC Maximizing Impact on Student Learning Sue A. Davis and Trish Carroll Mind Frame 7 Teachers believe it is their role to develop positive relationships in classrooms and staff rooms.  Teachers create a climate such that students believe they can make errors without blame.  Learning requires the making of mistakes.  Leaders must do this for staff as well. TPGES, Domain 2, “Classroom Environment” a.Creating an Environment of Respect and Rapport b.Establishing a Culture for Learning Domain 3, “Instruction” a.Communicating with Students Domain 4, “Professional Responsibilities” d.Participating in a Professional Community

11 KAAC Maximizing Impact on Student Learning Sue A. Davis and Trish Carroll  Teachers build trust and rapport with families.  Teachers provide clarity, support, and understanding of the language of learning for parents.  Schools, leaders and teachers enhance the engagement of students in their learning by bringing parents into the experience. Mind Frame 8 Educators must communicate the language of education to parents. TPGES, Domain 4, “Professional Responsibility” a.Reflecting on Teaching b.Maintaining Accurate Records c.Communicating with Families F.Demonstrating Professionalism

12 KAAC Maximizing Impact on Student Learning Sue A. Davis and Trish Carroll Meta-Meta Analysis: Hattie’s group designed algorithms that related more than 900 “meta- analyses” including over 50,000 studies and more than 240,000,000 students to measure the impact—or “effect” — of 180 variables on how “much” students learn in a year. The original “study” took fifteen years to complete. It is still going on. As new meta- analyzes are completed, the team includes them in the research.

13 KAAC Maximizing Impact on Student Learning Sue A. Davis and Trish Carroll Percentage of Achievement Variance

14 KAAC Maximizing Impact on Student Learning Sue A. Davis and Trish Carroll Hattie’s Categories of Influences Students Teachers Teaching Curricula Home Peers Principal Schools

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16 KAAC Maximizing Impact on Student Learning Sue A. Davis and Trish Carroll

17 KAAC Maximizing Impact on Student Learning Sue A. Davis and Trish Carroll Reverse Effects are self-explanatory, and below 0.0. Developmental Effects are d=0.0 to d=0.15, and the improvement we expect to see in a child who simply grows up with little or not schooling. Teacher Effects – teacher typically can attain d=0.20 to d=0.40 growth per year, and this can be considered average (refer to median standard deviation). This is subject to a lot of variation. Desired Effects are those above d=0.40 which are attributable to specific interventions or methods being researched.

18 Six Sign Posts Toward Excellence in Education, p Teachers are among the most powerful influences in learning. 2.Teachers need to be directive, influential, caring and actively and passionately engaged in teaching and learning. 3.Teachers need to be aware of what each student is thinking and what they know and be able to construct meaning in light of this knowledge of the students. 4.Teachers AND student need to know the learning intentions and the criteria for student success. 5.Teachers need to move from the single idea to multiple ideas and to relate and extend these ideas so that learners construct and reconstruct knowledge. 6.School leaders and teachers need to create schools, staffrooms and classroom environments in which error is welcomed as a learning opportunity.

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20 KAAC Maximizing Impact on Student Learning Sue A. Davis and Trish Carroll First – what could be so harmful that we would need to plan interventions to remove barriers, compensate, contest or combat its effect on learning?

21 RankInfluenceStudies Effect s Effect Size What does this mean to us? 150Mobility Television We cannot promote passive involvement with video stimulus. 148Retention Summer Vacation Regression in learning may require RTI, re-teaching or acceleration. 145 Open vs Traditional Classrooms Structure and boundaries appear to promote learning 133Diet Breakfast and lunch programs; school food banks and “back pack” distribution 133Gender If students make a friend in the first 6 weeks, effect of mobility negated. Retention is a last resort. It hurts kids. We often separate kids by gender but never change our teaching.

22 KAAC Maximizing Impact on Student Learning Sue A. Davis and Trish Carroll There are influences that have a better “effect size” than those we just examined, but they should be used with caution.

23 Rank InfluenceStudiesEffects Effect Size What Could This Mean? 119 Personality We can teach students how to be resilient, work hard and have “grit.” 114 Charter Schools Charter schools appear to have a lower impact on student learning than do public or private schools. 113 Class Size Summer School Exercise / Relaxation Programs Are the informal “brain breaks” used in some classrooms actually helping with the opportunity to learn? 77 Computer Assisted Instruction Time on Task Think more about what Marzano called “opportunity to learn” with time and a viable curriculum. Smaller classes are NOT bad but NOT cost effective. Again, no change in teaching. Summer school has little/no impact on summer regression. Credit recovery. CAI DOES have a positive effect, but it is far more effective with teacher input, guidance and feedback.

24 KAAC Maximizing Impact on Student Learning Sue A. Davis and Trish Carroll There are influences that consistently have the greatest “effect size” on student learning.

25 RankInfluence Effect Size What does this mean to daily instruction? 1 Student Expectations for Their Own Learning Piagetian Programs1.28 Continue to teach in developmentally appropriate ways: sensorimotor (birth to 2 years old); preoperational (2-7 years); Concrete Operation (7-11); Formal Operational (12 to adulthood) 3 Response to Intervention Providing Formative Evaluation.90 As with our assessment literacy focus in Kentucky, assessment is used to inform and adjust instruction so that students learn at an optimum level. 4Teacher Credibility.90 6Micro-teaching.88 Similar to student teaching activities where a mini-lesson is taught and then a mentor gives immediate feedback on teacher behaviors and student learning. 7Classroom discussion.82 8Teacher Clarity.75 8Feedback.75 10Reciprocal Teaching.74 The purpose of reciprocal teaching is to facilitate a group effort between teacher and students as well as among students in the task of bringing meaning to the text

26 RankInfluence Effect Size What does this mean to daily instruction? 1 Student Expectations for Their Own Learning years’ growth 2 Piagetian Programs years’ growth Continue to teach in developmentally appropriate ways: sensorimotor (birth to 2 years old); preoperational (2-7 years); Concrete Operation (7- 11); Formal Operational (12 to adulthood) 3 Response to Intervention years growth 4 Providing Formative Evaluation.90 2 years’ growth As with our assessment literacy focus in Kentucky, assessment is used to inform and adjust instruction so that students learn at an optimum level. 4Teacher Credibility.90 2 year’s growth Greatest impact on student learning. Describes students who challenge themselves with high expectations, work to meet them and achieve their goals. 3 rd most powerful influence – individual nature of interventions targeted to student’s specific needs. This should no longer be perceived as happenstance. Teachers can BUILD their credibility.

27 RankInfluence Effect Size What does this mean to daily instruction? 6 Micro- teaching.88 2 years’ growth Similar to student teaching activities where a mini- lesson is taught and then a mentor gives immediate feedback on teacher behaviors and student learning. 7 Classroom discussion.82 2 years’ growth 8 Teacher Clarity.75 2 year’s growth 8Feedback.75 2 years’ growth 10Reciprocal Teaching.74 2 years’ growth The purpose of reciprocal teaching is to facilitate a group effort between teacher and students as well as among students in the task of bringing meaning to the text. As in Mind Frame 5, teachers LISTEN and teach students to listen to each other. Protocols. Success Criteria - Specific learning goals stated in student friendly language and related to their interests. Dollops and dollops of feedback that is specific, related to the learning target and formative from teacher to student and student to teacher.

28 KAAC Maximizing Impact on Student Learning Sue A. Davis and Trish Carroll Help us write a conclusion and come to closure on the implications research by John Hattie, as written in Visible Learning and Visible Learning for Teachers, SHOULD have on our practice.

29 KAAC Maximizing Impact on Student Learning Sue A. Davis and Trish Carroll With your elbow partner, please answer these two questions: 1.What does this information mean to my school and me? 2.If we have the information, how can we not help but act?

30 KAAC Maximizing Impact on Student Learning Sue A. Davis and Trish Carroll Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better. It’s not. Dr. Seuss

31 KAAC Maximizing Impact on Student Learning Sue A. Davis and Trish Carroll When teachers SEE learning through the eyes of the student and when students SEE themselves as their own teachers, visible learning occurs.

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33 “I think what happens to us as educators is that we perceive our role as implementing the curriculum planning and delivering lessons and making sure the education we’re offering meets the needs of kids. What we don’t say is “we had an impact on them and their learning.’” “If I give you an incredibly difficult task to do, at some point very soon on you’re going to need some guidance and help. You’re going to need me to get involved and say something such as, “Don’t go that way; go this way.” And so instead of taking on the role as facilitator, teachers need to see themselves as change agents – the teacher’s role is to effect change. “ “I’m at the stage now where I don’t want to talk about teaching anymore – not because it isn’t important but because it often keeps us from having important discussions about learning. In teachers’ colleges where the emphasis is on teaching – they say, here’s a good way to teach and here’s how you teach this concept and this is what you do when this doesn’t happen, and so on.” “With the emphasis on evaluation of impact as the teacher’s mindset, the fundamental reason for administering assessments in the classroom is to find out what you as the teacher did well – who did you teach well and who not so well, what did you teach well and what not so well, and so on. “ “This model of teaching requires monologue with constant focus on the teacher. Another approach is to give a task to complete. You do it and if you don’t do it the way I hoped, we’ll talk about it and I’ll come up with another approach and give you another go at it. The emphasis in dialogue is active listening by the teacher to how students are learning. “ “The purpose of schools is to help students exceed their potential and do more than they thought they could do. To find out what students can do, and help them do better. And that’s a challenge. We should never accept a student’s best. It’s okay. But it’s a springboard to doing even better. “ “If I put up my hand, as a student in a classroom, and say, “Look I’m having trouble; I don’t understand,” then I am taking the risk that my fellow students will say, “Oh, there he goes…he doesn’t understand.” That’s why trust and positive relationships are so critical. “ “We learned that parents didn’t understand what happens in schools – and this is still the case with many parents today. They don’t understand the language of learning and they don’t understand what is involved in learning today. They don’t know how to talk with their children about their learning or with teachers about their children’s learning.” 8 Mind Frames from John Hattie


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