Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Shakespeare uses short and “headless” lines to suggest the supernatural  ] When shall we three meet again?  In thunder, lightning, or in rain?

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Shakespeare uses short and “headless” lines to suggest the supernatural  ] When shall we three meet again?  In thunder, lightning, or in rain?"— Presentation transcript:

1 Shakespeare uses short and “headless” lines to suggest the supernatural  ] When shall we three meet again?  In thunder, lightning, or in rain?

2 An example of line continuation between two witches  First witch: Where the place?  Second witch: Upon the heath.

3 Malcolm: Say to the King the knowledge of the broil As thou didst leave it. Captain: Doubtful [pause] it stood, As two spent swimmers that do cling together And choke their art.  The captain continues Malcolm’s verse line.  He misses a syllable, perhaps for breath.  Then he adds a metaphor, suggesting the speech was rehearsed

4 Irony and ambiguity: Ross  1.2: He reports how Macbeth defeated the Thane of Cawdor and Sweno, the king of Norway.  This repeats what the Captain has said.  Is Ross Macbeth’s agent?  Polanski makes him the “third murderer”  1.2: He reports how Macbeth defeated the Thane of Cawdor and Sweno, the king of Norway.  This repeats what the Captain has said.  Is Ross Macbeth’s agent?  Polanski makes him the “third murderer”

5 1.3: More adventurers of the first witch  A sailor’s wife had chestnuts in her lap,  And munched, and munched, and munched. “Give me,” quoth I.  Outlandish revenge for small insults typical of incompetent witches.  Not in Polanski  A sailor’s wife had chestnuts in her lap,  And munched, and munched, and munched. “Give me,” quoth I.  Outlandish revenge for small insults typical of incompetent witches.  Not in Polanski

6 1.3: More adventurers of the first witch  “Aroint thee, witch!” the rump-fed runnion cries.  Her husband’s to Aleppo gone, master o’th’ Tiger.  The second line does not scan: essentially prose, as the witch turns to short, happy verse as she plans her revenge:  But in a sieve I’ll thither sail,  And like a rat without a tail  I’ll do, I’ll do, I’ll do.  “Aroint thee, witch!” the rump-fed runnion cries.  Her husband’s to Aleppo gone, master o’th’ Tiger.  The second line does not scan: essentially prose, as the witch turns to short, happy verse as she plans her revenge:  But in a sieve I’ll thither sail,  And like a rat without a tail  I’ll do, I’ll do, I’ll do.

7 1.3: More adventurers of the first witch  limited powers  the witch cannot kill  Control of the weather Second witch: I’ll give thee a wind.... First witch: Though his bark cannot be lost, Yet it shall be tempest tossed.  limited powers  the witch cannot kill  Control of the weather Second witch: I’ll give thee a wind.... First witch: Though his bark cannot be lost, Yet it shall be tempest tossed.

8 Dramatic Irony  We know what characters don’t.  Suggests supernatural control (god-like author mimicked by witches, hence Polanski’s reading)  : Macbeth:  So foul and fair a day I have not seen  We know what characters don’t.  Suggests supernatural control (god-like author mimicked by witches, hence Polanski’s reading)  : Macbeth:  So foul and fair a day I have not seen

9 Clothing and baby images  Macbeth ( ): The Thane of Cawdor lives. Why do you dress me in borrowed robes? (prose) Macbeth ( ): [Aside to Banquo]: Do you not hope your children shall be kings?  Macbeth ( ): The Thane of Cawdor lives. Why do you dress me in borrowed robes? (prose) Macbeth ( ): [Aside to Banquo]: Do you not hope your children shall be kings?

10 Moral clarity  Contrast Hamlet  Compare to theme of doubleness Banquo ( ): And oftentimes to win us to our harm The instruments of darkness tell us truths.  Contrast Hamlet  Compare to theme of doubleness Banquo ( ): And oftentimes to win us to our harm The instruments of darkness tell us truths.

11 Time (tomorrow and tomorrow)  Macbeth struggles with predestination, restlessness.  Ignores Banquo’s garment image and completes either Banquo’s verse line or his own! ( ) If chance will have me king, why, chance may crown me Without my stir. Banquo: New honors come upon him Like our strange garments, cleave not to their mold But with the aid of use. Macbeth [aside]: Come what come may, Time and the hour runs through the roughest day.  Macbeth struggles with predestination, restlessness.  Ignores Banquo’s garment image and completes either Banquo’s verse line or his own! ( ) If chance will have me king, why, chance may crown me Without my stir. Banquo: New honors come upon him Like our strange garments, cleave not to their mold But with the aid of use. Macbeth [aside]: Come what come may, Time and the hour runs through the roughest day.

12 Double dealing Duncan: There’s no art To find the mind’s construction in the face. He was a gentleman on whom I built An absolute trust. ( ) Lady Macbeth: Your face, my thane, is as a book where men May read strange matters. (1.5.62) ( true? Or hallucination?) Duncan: There’s no art To find the mind’s construction in the face. He was a gentleman on whom I built An absolute trust. ( ) Lady Macbeth: Your face, my thane, is as a book where men May read strange matters. (1.5.62) ( true? Or hallucination?)

13 Political turmoil  King Duff  In 968, he fell sick. People suspected sorcery.  Duff puts down a rebellion, but when he refused to pardon Donald’s friends, Donald killed him at home and slays the groom.  Story elements:  Invasion, witchcraft, pushy wife, murder of king at home, killing of grooms, portents:  King Duff  In 968, he fell sick. People suspected sorcery.  Duff puts down a rebellion, but when he refused to pardon Donald’s friends, Donald killed him at home and slays the groom.  Story elements:  Invasion, witchcraft, pushy wife, murder of king at home, killing of grooms, portents:

14 First soliloquy  Recall key to giving soliloquies in Playing Shakespeare  What “suggestion” makes Macbeth’s hair stand on end? ( )  Why are “presents fears” less than “horrible imaginings” (138-39)  Why does Polanski omit it?  Recall key to giving soliloquies in Playing Shakespeare  What “suggestion” makes Macbeth’s hair stand on end? ( )  Why are “presents fears” less than “horrible imaginings” (138-39)  Why does Polanski omit it?

15 1.3: Action  As we can see from the thoughts of murdering Duncan that terrify Macbeth, he lies to Banquo about wanting to “speak / Our hearts freely to each other.”  Why is this lie an example of irony?  As we can see from the thoughts of murdering Duncan that terrify Macbeth, he lies to Banquo about wanting to “speak / Our hearts freely to each other.”  Why is this lie an example of irony?

16 Polanski’s added violence  Lynchings after the opening battle  Death of the Thane of Cawdor (1.4.2)  Is Malcolm’s report believable, that he asked pardon and died well, casting away his life like “a careless trifle”?  Lynchings after the opening battle  Death of the Thane of Cawdor (1.4.2)  Is Malcolm’s report believable, that he asked pardon and died well, casting away his life like “a careless trifle”?

17 Post hoc ergo propter hoc  Macbeth: “They met me in the day of success; and I have learned by perfect’st report they have more in them than mortal knowledge.” (1.5.1)  What report?  Why should he tell Lady Macbeth?  Macbeth: “They met me in the day of success; and I have learned by perfect’st report they have more in them than mortal knowledge.” (1.5.1)  What report?  Why should he tell Lady Macbeth?

18 Trope of insufficiency, like speechlessness, a warning sign in Shakespeare  Duncan says he cannot pay Macbeth what he owes(1.4.20)

19 The set up for irony  Macbeth tells Duncan he will “make joyful / The hearing of my wife with your approach”  Lady Macbeth says “The raven himself is hoarse / That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan / Under my battlements” ( )  And Duncan: “This castle hath a pleasant seat. The air / Nimbly and sweetly recommends itself / Unto our gentle senses” ( )  Macbeth tells Duncan he will “make joyful / The hearing of my wife with your approach”  Lady Macbeth says “The raven himself is hoarse / That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan / Under my battlements” ( )  And Duncan: “This castle hath a pleasant seat. The air / Nimbly and sweetly recommends itself / Unto our gentle senses” ( )

20 Word echoes: characters hear each other and remember  Lady Macbeth: And when goes hence?  Macbeth: Tomorrow, as he purposes.  Lady Macbeth: Oh, never / Shall sun that morrow see!  Compare “Tomorrow and tomorrow and tomorrow”  Lady Macbeth: And when goes hence?  Macbeth: Tomorrow, as he purposes.  Lady Macbeth: Oh, never / Shall sun that morrow see!  Compare “Tomorrow and tomorrow and tomorrow”

21 Highly charged language If it were done when ‘tis done, then ‘twere well It were done quickly. If th’assassination Could trammel up the consequence, and catch With his surcease success.... ( )

22 Reasons for not killing Duncan:  Bad precedent (“teach bloody instruction”)  Double trust of guest and kinsman  Virtues and popularity of king  No “spur”  Bad precedent (“teach bloody instruction”)  Double trust of guest and kinsman  Virtues and popularity of king  No “spur”

23 Film technique: “If it were done”  Use multiple shots  Move through space  Find visual equivalents for word images:  Musicians  Dinner and toast  Singing Fleance  Wind and lamps  Storm and horses  Castle in distance  Use multiple shots  Move through space  Find visual equivalents for word images:  Musicians  Dinner and toast  Singing Fleance  Wind and lamps  Storm and horses  Castle in distance

24 Dinner = hospitality (trust as guest)

25 Thunder prelude to music

26 Musicians

27 Boy singing  “Equivocal love song, a warning  Young boy as prophet, cf  Ross in control  Dinner = Harmony; communion,  Lady Macbeth flirts  “Equivocal love song, a warning  Young boy as prophet, cf  Ross in control  Dinner = Harmony; communion,  Lady Macbeth flirts

28 Back to head shot

29 Stormy night  Horses = passions of Macbeth’s soul  Visual equivalent for Lennox’s description of the night ( ff.)  Horses = passions of Macbeth’s soul  Visual equivalent for Lennox’s description of the night ( ff.)

30 Macbeth alone  Follows text: “left the chamber”  Rain  Head shot = mental cogitation  Follows text: “left the chamber”  Rain  Head shot = mental cogitation

31 Mixed metaphor  Lady Macbeth: Was the hope drunk wherein you dressed yourself? (1.7.37)  Is this part of Lady M’s character?  Lady Macbeth: Was the hope drunk wherein you dressed yourself? (1.7.37)  Is this part of Lady M’s character?

32 Mixed metaphor  Lady Macbeth: If he do bleed, / I’ll gild the faces of the grooms withal, / For it must seem their guilt (2.2.62)  Is this part of Lady M’s character?

33 Lady Macbeth’s arguments for murder  Don’t be drunk or sleepy  Show you love me  Banish fear  “ornament of life”  Don’t be a coward  Be a man, not a beast.  Don’t be drunk or sleepy  Show you love me  Banish fear  “ornament of life”  Don’t be a coward  Be a man, not a beast.

34 Be a man

35 Lennox? Motivation?

36 1.7: Action  “Away, and mock the time with fairest show.  False face must hide what the false heart doth know.”  “Away, and mock the time with fairest show.  False face must hide what the false heart doth know.”

37 Moral moment (2.1.27)

38 2.1.36

39 Multisyllables v. Monosyllables Will all great Neptune’s ocean wash this blood Clean from my hand? No, this my hand will rather The multitudinous seas incarnadine, Making the green one red.

40 Dramatic irony  “A little water clears us of this deed” (2.2.72)

41 Porter (2.3)

42 Faint? ( and 120)  His silver skin laced with his golden blood... ... Who could refrain  That had a heart to love, and in that heart  Courage to make’s love known?

43 Macbeth in Holinshed’s Chronicle  Banquo is a rough tax collector who forces Macdonwald to rebellion.  Macbeth urges faint Duncan to battle, kills Macdonwald and followers, starting a dead grudge by islanders, who get help from Sweno of Norway.  Macbeth meets 3 witches  Banquo is a rough tax collector who forces Macdonwald to rebellion.  Macbeth urges faint Duncan to battle, kills Macdonwald and followers, starting a dead grudge by islanders, who get help from Sweno of Norway.  Macbeth meets 3 witches

44 Macbeth in Holinshed’s Chronicle  Macbeth kills Duncan, puts down nobles, reforms thieves  10 years just reign  After he kills Banquo, nothing goes right  Builds castle of Dunsinane to oppress nobles: Macduff fails to appear  Kills Macduff’s wife at Fife  Trusts witches’ prophecies  Macbeth kills Duncan, puts down nobles, reforms thieves  10 years just reign  After he kills Banquo, nothing goes right  Builds castle of Dunsinane to oppress nobles: Macduff fails to appear  Kills Macduff’s wife at Fife  Trusts witches’ prophecies

45 Character  Hallucinations and soliloquies seem to take us into the minds of Macbeth and Lady Madbeth (p. 769)

46 Why does Macbeth kill Duncan?  Witches  Lady Macbeth  Ambition  Self-persuasion  Strange attraction to beauty of death and language  Witches  Lady Macbeth  Ambition  Self-persuasion  Strange attraction to beauty of death and language

47 Lady Macbeth’s ethos  Ruthless  Gender envy, father lover  How many children does she have?  Is she tragic?  Ruthless  Gender envy, father lover  How many children does she have?  Is she tragic?

48 The pusher

49 Tragedy  Macbeth’s sense of right v. ambition (p. 767)  “Monster” with “poetic spirit”  Polanski: meaninglessness of life (and society) after WWII, nuclear age  Macbird during Vietnam  Today?  Reaction to Gunpowder plot = double rebellion in play = 9/11 and/or WMD  If good quality creates disaster…  Macbeth’s sense of right v. ambition (p. 767)  “Monster” with “poetic spirit”  Polanski: meaninglessness of life (and society) after WWII, nuclear age  Macbird during Vietnam  Today?  Reaction to Gunpowder plot = double rebellion in play = 9/11 and/or WMD  If good quality creates disaster…

50 Act one actions  1.1: The witches unify.  1.2: Duncan rewards Macbeth.  1.3: Macbeth equivocates with Banquo  1.4: Macbeth equivocates with Duncan  1.5: Macbeth equivocates with Lady Macbeth  1.6: Charmed by her welcome, Duncan asks for Lady Macbeth ’ s hand.  1.7: Macbeth equivocates with his own features.  1.1: The witches unify.  1.2: Duncan rewards Macbeth.  1.3: Macbeth equivocates with Banquo  1.4: Macbeth equivocates with Duncan  1.5: Macbeth equivocates with Lady Macbeth  1.6: Charmed by her welcome, Duncan asks for Lady Macbeth ’ s hand.  1.7: Macbeth equivocates with his own features.

51 Act two actions  2.1: Macbeth accepts invitation to murder Duncan.  2.2: Lady Macbeth takes the daggers from Macbeth.  2.3: Macbeth orders everyone to get dressed.  2.4: Macduff hints, or boldly and ironically states, what he thinks of Macbeth.  2.1: Macbeth accepts invitation to murder Duncan.  2.2: Lady Macbeth takes the daggers from Macbeth.  2.3: Macbeth orders everyone to get dressed.  2.4: Macduff hints, or boldly and ironically states, what he thinks of Macbeth.

52 Act three actions  3.1: Macbeth apostrophizes Banquo  3.2: Macbeth hides his murder plans from Lady Macbeth.  3.3: Fleance escapes.  3.4: After seeing Banquo ’ s ghost, Macbeth uses his reason to deny the need to reason.  [3.5: Hecate berates the other witches for not letting her in on the plot against Macbeth.]  3.6: Lennox sends a lord to England for help. Rising action.  3.1: Macbeth apostrophizes Banquo  3.2: Macbeth hides his murder plans from Lady Macbeth.  3.3: Fleance escapes.  3.4: After seeing Banquo ’ s ghost, Macbeth uses his reason to deny the need to reason.  [3.5: Hecate berates the other witches for not letting her in on the plot against Macbeth.]  3.6: Lennox sends a lord to England for help. Rising action.

53 Act Four actions (counterstroke)  4.1: After seeing apparitions, Macbeth vows to take action anytime, anywhere. ///  4.2: Macduff ’ s son defends his mother.  4.3: Malcolm leads his forces to meet with the English king, certain “ the powers above ” are on his side.  4.1: After seeing apparitions, Macbeth vows to take action anytime, anywhere. ///  4.2: Macduff ’ s son defends his mother.  4.3: Malcolm leads his forces to meet with the English king, certain “ the powers above ” are on his side.

54 Act Five actions (denouement: England wins)  5.1: Doctor dares not speak,  5.2: Lennox leads disaffected Thanes  5.3: Doctor regrets his “profit”  5.4: Siward harnesses himself to time.  5.5: Macbeth orders the wind and clouds for war.  5.6: Macduff, not in charge, calls for trumpets.  5.7: Englishman invites Scot into Scot’s own castle  5.8: Malcolm issues invitation to Scone.  5.1: Doctor dares not speak,  5.2: Lennox leads disaffected Thanes  5.3: Doctor regrets his “profit”  5.4: Siward harnesses himself to time.  5.5: Macbeth orders the wind and clouds for war.  5.6: Macduff, not in charge, calls for trumpets.  5.7: Englishman invites Scot into Scot’s own castle  5.8: Malcolm issues invitation to Scone.

55 Country-western Macbeth  What you have  What you want.  What you had but lost.  What you have  What you want.  What you had but lost.

56 Macbeth as tragic  admirable, meditative man  not a happy murderer, like Richard III  not immune to temptation  caught in a world of equivocations  himself a bit of a liar, like all of us  shows how a good man can go horribly wrong, producing pity and fear  admirable, meditative man  not a happy murderer, like Richard III  not immune to temptation  caught in a world of equivocations  himself a bit of a liar, like all of us  shows how a good man can go horribly wrong, producing pity and fear


Download ppt "Shakespeare uses short and “headless” lines to suggest the supernatural  ] When shall we three meet again?  In thunder, lightning, or in rain?"

Similar presentations


Ads by Google