Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

1 Motivating Trainees and Trainers Richard E. Clark Center for Cognitive Technology Institute for Creative Technology University of.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "1 Motivating Trainees and Trainers Richard E. Clark Center for Cognitive Technology Institute for Creative Technology University of."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 Motivating Trainees and Trainers Richard E. Clark Center for Cognitive Technology http:\\cct.usc.edu Institute for Creative Technology University of Southern California clark@usc.edu Ft. Eustis Workshop November 2005

2 2 Topics Why is motivation important? What are your motivation problems? –Describe individual and team problems Three types of motivation problems –What types did you describe? Three types of motivation solutions –How would you solve the problems Team Motivation problems and solutions

3 3 Activities You describe motivation problems I’ll describe three types of problems You fit your problems to three types I’ll describe how to solve problems You’ll apply solutions to your problems and discuss whether they’ll work I’ll describe Team Motivation problems and solutions and you’ll apply & discuss

4 4 Why is motivation important? 50% give only minimum effort 84% say they could work much harder 40% of performance due to motivation –40% due to training Motivation starts with the motivator –If you are not motivated and don’t believe in yourself, you cannot motivate others

5 5 Describe Motivation Problems Think of two motivation problems – One individual and one team problem Answer three questions: 1.Who - is not doing something? 2.What - is not being done? 3.Do they know how to do it? 4.Do they have necessary equipment?

6 6 Break

7 7 Three Motivation Problems 1.Not starting something new Intending but not acting 2.Not persisting Avoiding, arguing, doing something less important, waiting for deadline 3.Not working smart enough Using familiar strategies when new ideas are required and not taking responsibility for lack of achievement

8 8 Group Activity: Classify Motivation Problems A.Classify all problems as one or more of the three below – “If it is not broken, don’t fix it” B.Then select three of the problems you have classified - one for each of the 3 types – and describe them to everyone: 1. Not Starting 2. Not Persisting 3. Not Working Smart

9 9 Break

10 10 What Causes Motivation Problems? All based on personal “belief” not “reality” 1.No VALUE for the task 2.Under or Over CONFIDENCE 3.Strong negative EMOTION Lets take closer look at each one

11 11 1) Values VALUES –Why bother? Doesn’t like task - likes others better Sees no risk in avoiding task –So does not start No personal benefit in completing task –So does not persist

12 12 2) Confidence Under Confidence: Can be “down”, depressed, self- handicapping (“I can’t do it”) –So does not start Takes too much responsibility – –So does not persist Try’s to find “honorable” out – gets sick Looks for easier task

13 13 2) Confidence Over Confidence: Task is “beneath me” –So does not start Blames others for mistakes & is angry –So does not start or persist Using old and inadequate knowledge when new strategies required –Refuses to “work smarter”

14 14 3) Emotions STRONG NEGATIVE EMOTIONS I’m angry at … –Anger - belief that cause is external –Belief is that cause is uncontrollable I’m feeling down/depressed –Cause is internal –Belief that something in me is “broken” and can not be changed/improved

15 15 Lunch Break Return at 13:30

16 16 10 Motivation Killers 1.Lie to people 2.Make bigoted comments and decisions 3.Act negative, pessimistic, detached 4.Ignore peoples’ beliefs, focus on facts 5.Set vague goals 6.Impose useless rules just to prove you can 7.Assume that everyone is like you 8.When frustrated, get angry and critical 9.Catch people screwing up and point it out 10.Be a hypocrite and do not “walk the talk”

17 17 Solving Motivation Problems 6 General strategies : LISA: LIsten – Summarize – Ask Understand before judging people Set concrete, challenging, current goals Act positive, optimistic & fair Focus feedback on strategy not mistake Attribute problems to controllable cause

18 18 Solutions to Value Problems Suggest: “Hold your nose” –Describe benefit of finishing task “You are good at this kind of task” –Remind them of past successes “Here is what you RISK by avoiding it” –Be honest – they must want to avoid the risk Insure fairness and trust If all else fails, consider offering a tangible and valued incentive

19 19 Confidence Solutions: Under-confidence Are goals concrete and current? Break task into smaller chunks Offer coaching help on “how to” Attribute mistakes to “effort” not ability Monitor progress closely Give feedback about strategy not the person’s mistakes

20 20 Confidence Solutions: Overconfidence They think they know how and they don’t Test their strategy against better alternative They must believe their strategy not working Attribute mistakes to their strategy and misunderstanding of goal –Goal is novel for them and they think it is familiar Get agreement on new strategy Monitor progress

21 21 Emotion Solutions 1LISA: LIsten – Summarize – Ask 2Understand people before judging them 3Set concrete, challenging, current goals 4Act positive, optimistic & fair 5Focus feedback on strategy not mistake 6Attribute problems to controllable cause Anger (external problem is controllable) Depression (strategy can be improved)

22 22 Break

23 23 Group Activity: Solve Your Motivation Problems Solve the three problems you have chosen – and describe your solutions: 1.Briefly describe problem and classify Starting? Persisting? Working smart? 2.Describe solution and why you chose it –Values? Confidence? Emotions? 3.Describe special problems you encountered and any reservations you have about solutions

24 24 Will The Solutions Work? You must believe that they will work and project that belief Solutions must be tailored to fit individual beliefs, values & expectations Test and revise – use clear indicators of success and failure for what you do Tomorrow, Team Motivation

25 25 Motivating Trainees and Trainers Richard E. Clark Center for Cognitive Technology http:\\cct.usc.edu Institute for Creative Technology University of Southern California clark@usc.edu Ft. Eustis Workshop November 2005

26 26 Team Motivation

27 27 Activities Review your team motivation problems I’ll present three types of team problems You classify your team problems I’ll present solutions to three types You try to apply solutions to your problems and we’ll discuss issues We’ll summarize the workshop and finish

28 28 Team Motivation Three critical issues: 1.Team members must have different skills and/or roles 2.Team members must respect each others skills and commitment 3.Team must cooperate, collaborate, work smoothly together

29 29 Team Motivation 1) DIFFERENT SKILLS/ROLES: If all do the same job it is not a team – it is a collection of individuals The more different the jobs and skills, the more team motivation is critical

30 30 Team Motivation 2) MUTUAL RESPECT : Biggest factor in high pressure success! Do not have to like each other but they must respect each other’s skills Disrespect is like acid - causes social loafing & eats away at team performance Evaluate individual contributions to team

31 31 Team Motivation 2) WORKING TOGETHER SMOOTHLY: Prima Donna’s and silent “Back Stabbers” destroy team motivation Internal competition often destructive Evaluate individuals’ collaborative efforts

32 32 Group Activity: Classify Team Motivation Problem Classify the team problems you have chosen: 1)Briefly describe the team’s goals and the evidence that they are not achieving at expected levels 2)Do team members have different roles? 3)Do they trust each other’s skill levels? –If the answer is no, explain. 4)Are they working together smoothly? –If the answer is no, explain.

33 33 Break

34 34 Solving Disrespect Problems Catch them being respectful, point it out Tell stories about teams that win in the crunch because of mutual confidence Do everything possible to promote mutual respect and discourage disrespect Weak members threaten team success –Weak members must believe that their effort is vital to the team – need training –“Get serious, get busy, work harder – believe in yourself”

35 35 Solving Collaboration Problems Catch them collaborating - point it out –Suggest more effective strategies Tell stories about teams with strong members who won by working together –And dysfunctional team stories Focus team training on interactions Discourage competition within the team –Promote competition between teams for members who do the same job Make a “No Prima Donnas or Back Stabbers” rule and enforce it

36 36 Group Activity: Classify Team Motivation Problem Solve one of the team problems you have chosen: 1)Briefly describe the team’s goals and the evidence that they are not achieving at expected levels and that they either do not respect each other or are not collaborating 2)Describe how you would solve the problem and how you would know that it was solved

37 37 Summary Motivation starts with you – if you are not motivated you cannot motivate others If it is not broken, don’t fix it Promote starting, persisting, working smarter, mutual respect and collaboration Look at the world through the eyes of people who you are training or managing –Understand before judging – Listen carefully Your job - to help them believe they will succeed Adjust their values, confidence and emotions


Download ppt "1 Motivating Trainees and Trainers Richard E. Clark Center for Cognitive Technology Institute for Creative Technology University of."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google