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Campus Citizenship Behavior: A Motivational Analysis for Change Debbie DeLong, PhD Chatham University Mary Whitney, PhD (antic.) Chatham University.

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Presentation on theme: "Campus Citizenship Behavior: A Motivational Analysis for Change Debbie DeLong, PhD Chatham University Mary Whitney, PhD (antic.) Chatham University."— Presentation transcript:

1 Campus Citizenship Behavior: A Motivational Analysis for Change Debbie DeLong, PhD Chatham University Mary Whitney, PhD (antic.) Chatham University

2 Motivation All intentional behavior is a function of motivation. Motivational process theories seek to explain how behavior is energized, directed and sustained. In its simplest form: But …is it ever this simple? AttitudesIntentionsBehavior

3 Motivation But …is it ever this simple? ?? AttitudesIntentionsBehavior All intentional behavior is a function of motivation. Motivational process theories seek to explain how behavior is energized, directed and sustained. In its simplest form:

4 Classic theories of motivation such as Expectancy Theory, Equity theory and Psychological Empowerment explain the connections, or lack thereof, between attitudes, intentions and behavior. Intervening Factors Self-EfficacyInstrumentalityGoal Valance EmpowermentEquity

5 What beliefs, perceptions and values significantly predict environmentally responsible (ER) attitudes and behaviors on campus? Do these influences differ by campus population? Methodology: – Online and paper surveys of attitudes, values and behaviors pertaining to environmental responsibility. – Random samples of undergrads (N=58), grads (N=25), faculty (N=59), and staff (N=66). – All questions use a 1-7 scale (1=low amount, 7= high amount). Study Objectives & Methodology

6 Finding #1 Campus populations have significantly different levels of self-reported ER concerns and behaviors.

7 Finding #2 Campus populations have significantly different perceptions of their own versus Chatham’s ER performance.

8 Finding #3 AGE matters! Younger vs. Older individuals have significantly different levels of self-reported ER concerns and behaviors.

9 Finding #4 REWARD VALANCE matters! Orientation toward intrinsic vs. extrinsic rewards has significantly different levels of self-reported ER concerns and behaviors.

10 Overall Findings Self-Efficacy, Instrumentality, Empowerment and Equity perceptions explain the gap between ER concerns and behaviors to a different extent by population and reward valance. Self-Efficacyxx Instrumentalityxx Empowermentxxx Equityx ER Concern ER Behavior

11 References Expectancy Theory Vroom, V.H. Work and Motivation. New York: Wiley, Bandura, A. "Self Efficacy: Toward a Unifying Theory of Behavioral Change." Psychological Review 84 (1977), pp Lawler, E.E. & J.L. Suttle. "Expectancy Theory and Job Behavior." Organizational Behavior and Human Performance 9 (1973), pp Extrinsic vs. Intrinsic Motivation Deci, E.L., & R.M. Ryan. "The What and Why of Goal Pursuits: Human Needs and Self Determination of Behavior." Psychological Inquiry 11 (2000), pp Equity Theory Adams, J.S. "Inequity in Social Exchange." In Advances in Experimental Social Psychology, Vol.2, ed. E. Berkowitz. New York: Academic Press, 1965, pp Psychological Empowerment Thomas, K.W., & B.A. Velthouse. "Cognitive Elements of Empowerment: An 'Interpretive' Model of Intrinsic Task Motivation." Academy of Management Review 15 (1990), pp


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