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Building a Better DW Quarterback 1) Choosing a DW QB 2) DW QB Coaching Strategies.

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1 Building a Better DW Quarterback 1) Choosing a DW QB 2) DW QB Coaching Strategies

2 Some basic assumptions You are coaching a DW football team You have a limited number of available “ball carrying” athletes, whatever that number is…AND… you have an even smaller number of exceptional ball carrying athletes. You run at least these 8 basic plays: 1- Power (Toss)2- Trap 3- Counter 4- Sweep (Lead, Buck, Jet) 5- Wedge 6- G (Belly) 6- PA Pass (Toss action)8- Straight Drop Back Pass You have limited available practice time.

3 Defining the position What is a DW Quarterback’s job? Understand the offense …not just his position. Play calling system- Know what those numbers and words mean. Adjustments- Know how to apply them. Key assignments on every play- Know who is doing what. Execute his assignments Run effectively when called on to do so Pass effectively when called on to do so Block effectively when called on to do so Handle the football securely and effectively Footwork / Posture/ Hand-eye coordination / Ball Control / Deception Communicate effectively with team mates. Have the respect of his team- Players will follow someone they respect. “Command” their attention- Be heard above the crowd.

4 You probably won’t ever find a kid who naturally displays all of these attributes. ….But you can find kids who have some or even many of them. Defining the position DW QB- Intelligent, quick thinking, and agile athlete. Must enjoy, and be willing to employ, extreme physical contact. Arm strength and throwing skills highly desirable. Must have exceptional leadership and communication skills. Must also have the ability to self-manage under pressure. Exceptional size and/or 4.4 speed a big plus. Experience preferred. A DW Quarterback’s job description might read something like this:

5 Choosing a DW QB Know which QB skills/talents are most important to you as the coach. --- Do yourself a favor and write them down. While these skills are universally desirable for DW QBs, we should also remember that different coaches will have different needs from their QBs. Know which of these QB skills you will be able to teach and which ones you won’t.---Write these down too. Usually because of insufficient available time or logistics there will be something that we can’t or won’t be able to teach as coaches. In terms of the QB position- For me these are usually arm strength, and general coordination…the rest I can usually teach in the time I have available.

6 Choosing a DW QB So I know what abilities I’m looking for…and which of these I can and can’t teach…now what? Compare your list of most desirable QB qualities with your list of QB skills that you won’t be able to teach…Do any of the entries match? NO - Congratulations! You are one helluva good coach! Stop here and put any kid you want at QB. :-) YES - You now have a great starting point for figuring out which kids to consider for QB… The kids who display some natural ability in the areas you won’t have time or capability to teach are probably your best bets to consider for the DW quarterback position.

7 If you have a limited pool of ball carrier type athletes, and an even smaller pool of gifted athletes, the odds are that the kids who would make the best QBs are also the kids who make your best WBs and FBs…Most DW coaches will prefer to have their top kids at WB and FB positions. In fact, some of us prefer our TE’s to be just as good of athletes as our WBs and FBs… Choosing a DW QB Why? As you can see, my best 3 or 4 athletes are usually used in other positions. This invariably leads to a shortage of top athletes available for the QB position. Consider this -- When I look to fill out the starting ball carriers in my offense (FB, QB, WBx2, & TEx2), I usually rank them something like this: #1- FB #2- A Back (Left Wing) #3- C Back (Right Wing) -OR- #3- C Back (Right Wing) #4- QB #4- TE #5 & 6- TE’s #5- QB/TE #6- TE/QB

8 Choosing a DW QB …Which usually means I’ll be teaching one of my “average” kids how to be a QB… Hopefully a great QB. But it’s much harder to develop a great QB out of an average athlete than it is to develop one out of an excellent athlete…And it really doesn’t help if my average kid lacks skills in areas I won’t have the logistics to teach. So of my average kids, the ones who display some natural ability in the skills I consider most important and have the most difficulty teaching are the ones that will show the most development as a QB in my system. For me this usually means my QB’s are athletes that are smart and physically coordinated. They have decent arm strength, but don’t always throw the best passes. They are usually slow or short…or both.

9 A few things to consider:  DW quarterbacks are often slightly different types of athletes than their I or Spread formation counterparts. This is not because the system requires it, it’s because the system allows for it.  The DW can be very successful with just an “average” athlete at QB-- So long as he has some physical durability, some smarts, can throw the ball a little, and can move on his feet.  In the DW, the quarterback is part of a 4-back offense. Not looking at him as such is an unnecessary limitation on yourself. It’s easy to get stuck thinking that your QB is a handoff machine who will occasionally throw a pass…but in this offense there are many, many simple ways to involve him. *** Our unusual use of the QB is one of the things that separates from the other offenses out there. Choosing a DW QB

10 None of this should be mistaken as an assumption that there is no benefit to having a top athlete at QB …or that a DW coach should never seek to have the best possible player at the QB position. On the contrary, if you have enough top athletes available, by all means play one at QB. Choosing a DW QB This is simply an acknowledgement that in many cases you won’t have a whole posse of stud athletes, nor will you be able to recruit your perfect QB….In these cases there are ways to maximize what you can do with the athletes you have.

11 Choosing a DW QB In terms of the raw ability and physical and mental characteristics of the players I like to use at QB, I usually look for the these: My General Rules of Thumb when considering athletes for the QB position: 1- Rarely will I place my top athlete at QB…(unless I have an abundance of them) 2- Taller is better…but height never trumps ability. 3- Speed isn’t necessary…but it’s good to have. 4- Coordination is necessary. 5- Arm strength is great, but arm accuracy is greater. 6- Hitting is not optional. “Finesse” quarterbacks need not apply. 7- Brains are not optional. If you can’t think on your toes, you can’t play QB. 8- Attitude is everything. They MUST be coachable kids.

12 QB Coaching Strategies Improving the QB’s Ball Handling Improving the QB’s Passing Game Ball Security / Footwork / Deception / Pitch Mechanics

13 QB Coaching Strategies Improving the QB’s Ball Handling Job #1 for the QB on every single play is to secure the football! There is no more important element of his execution than this. Without the ball, we go nowhere. A QB who manages to successfully secure every snap is automatically a “good” ball handler…but it takes more than that to be a great ball handler. To be a great ball handler in the DW- The QB must combine ball security with good footwork, agility, posture, timing, and deception. Ball Security

14 QB Coaching Strategies Improving the QB’s Ball Handling Ball Security Begins with the snap Pre-Practice Snaps. This really is a MUST. Prior to the start of every practice your QBs and Cs should get together and perform at least 50 snaps. 25 with a QB pivot to the right, and 25 with a pivot to the left. Every QB and C you have should go through this. If possible, have a coach (preferably you) stand in pitch relationship with the QB and receive a pitch after every snap. Watch their execution from the start of the cadence to end of the pivot.

15 QB Coaching Strategies Improving the QB’s Ball Handling Common errors to look for in snap mechanics. These often lead to muffed snaps so try to eliminate them. 1) QB not placing his hands firmly against the C’s butt. 2) QB allowing his hands to separate when the ball contacts them (this one happens a lot to younger players) 3) C lifting his butt too far as he delivers the snap. 4) Poor timing between QB and C. (late/early snap) 5) QB crowding the C The is no better way to correct these problems than the copious use of pre-practice snaps. You, your QBs, and your Cs should all get in the habit of arriving a little bit early to practice. Ball Security

16 QB Coaching Strategies Improving the QB’s Ball Handling We also need to remember that the QB is part of a 4 Back offense and therefore needs all of the same ball security practice that you would put your WBs and FBs through…In addition to the afore mentioned snap practice routines. Drills such as Handoff Lines, the Squeeze Drill, and The Strip Drill are just as beneficial to QB’s as they are to WBs & FBs. Use every individual or group drill and play repetition which would normally begin with the QB receiving a snap as an opportunity to practice snap mechanics. Never have your QB start from a “ball in hand” position. Whenever possible, have a coach ‘snap’ the ball to him from a kneeling position to begin the rep. Maximize Your Opportunities- Ball Security

17 QB Coaching Strategies Improving the QB’s Ball Handling Footwork More than being able to run Good footwork requires balance and agility combined with solid pivot mechanics. A QB can be slow but still have good feet. I will always work to develop a QB’s footwork before his speed. Footwork / Balance & Agility Balance and agility are things I like to work on during team warm up sessions …This saves precious practice time for individual or backfield practice sessions later. If a kid needs more agility work than can be delivered in this format, I usually won’t consider him for QB.

18 QB Coaching Strategies Improving the QB’s Ball Handling My preferred way to build agility and coordination is through the use of simple drills that require no special equipment, can be done quickly and easily, and get excellent results with regular use. I like to open practice sessions with this set: Line Hops- Done on one foot. Right & Left then with both feet. (10 reps ea.) Run Lines- Carioca, Side Shuffle, Backpedal, Hammer Hops Controlled Lunges- Back straight, big strides, alternate legs, easy pace, hands on hips. Forwards then backwards. “Trippers”- Run lines. Players start in a backpedal, rotate to a run when the whistle blows, then back to a backpedal it blows again…then back again, etc. etc. Footwork / Balance & Agility

19 QB Coaching Strategies Improving the QB’s Ball Handling Footwork / Pivot Mechanics Pivot mechanics play a big role in the QB’s footwork since 90% of our plays begin with a full or half pivot. Standard Stance- Balanced stance, feet slightly wider than shoulders, toes pointed in (pigeon toed). Backside foot steps to 4 o’clock, pivot on the toes/ball of the play side foot. Alternate Stance- Unbalanced stance, feet slightly wider than shoulders, back side foot staggered back slightly. Backside foot jab steps to 4 o’clock, pivot on the toes/ball of the play side foot. Regardless of which stance you use, the backside foot always steps and the play side foot is always the pivot foot. Most of his weight should be “pre-loaded” on the toes of his play side foot…

20 QB Coaching Strategies Improving the QB’s Ball Handling -The body always follows the eyes so get the head around to the desired path or ball carrier immediately following the snap. - R-e-a-c-h for that step…Insist on getting the backside foot all the way around to 4 o’clock. - Pigeon toed stances make the pivot easier and faster. - Pre load the body weight on the play side (pivot) foot. - Align as far as possible from the C. Extend the arms into snap position. Footwork / Pivot Mechanics In general, the faster the pivot the better the play. You can shave time off of the pivot with few simple coaching points

21 QB Coaching Strategies Improving the QB’s Ball Handling Footwork / Posture Posture has a lot to do with how good or bad a QB’s footwork is. Posture impacts the QB’s ability to conceal the ball, to pivot, and to move with balance. Posture has an impact on nearly every aspect of the QB’s job. Knees Bent, Back Straight, Elbows in, Eyes Up- That’s the mantra in terms of QB posture. I look for this form in all functions except perhaps the acts of throwing or scrambling. For me, posture is difficult to “drill”. I usually need one-on-one time with the QB to teach it. I use pre practice snap sessions to work through the specifics of maintaining correct posture during the snap and pivot. Individual position practice sessions are the best place to work on proper posture when executing various play actions. If individual practice time is not available to you, backfield practice sessions (skellies) are probably the next best thing.

22 QB Coaching Strategies Improving the QB’s Ball Handling Deception Deception and ball concealment are significant parts of our game. To that end, QB posture combined with ball handling play a key role in our ability to deceive the defense. Anytime the QB is not handing or passing the football, I want it securely “seated”…The ball should be held against the groin, point down, elbows in. This allows the QB the greatest opportunity to conceal the ball while still being able to deliver it (hand, pitch, pass) quickly. In fact, I often want the QB keep his hands in this position even if he doesn’t have the ball. Seating the ball is a simple and almost automatic function *if* you can teach the correct posture to your QB. When the elbows are pulled in and the knees bend, the ball naturally moves to the seated position.

23 QB Coaching Strategies Improving the QB’s Ball Handling Deception Although the QB plays a large role in how we deceive defenses, he rarely performs actual ball fakes. Most of the faking will be performed by the other running backs. Keeping the ball out of the defense’s sight is the QB’s primary goal in terms of deception. Faking with it only shows them where the ball is. If you ever do need to have your QB perform an actual play action fake, have him either perform a simple “shoulder dip” -or- an empty hand fake…But in either case, he should strive to keep the ball seated and maintain posture.

24 QB Coaching Strategies Improving the QB’s Ball Handling Pitch Mechanics Good pitch mechanics are an obvious requirement for the DW QB. It’s important that he deliver a consistent and catchable pitch every time. Pitch mechanics impact the ability to maintain good posture, the ability to exercise good ball security, the ability to deceive the defense, and the overall timing of the Power play.

25 QB Coaching Strategies Improving the QB’s Ball Handling Pitch Mechanics A good pitch always starts with the ball in the seated position. IMPORTANT- I spend a lot of time stressing the need to keep the elbows in against the sides of the body during the pivot and pitch. This provides certain benefits: Pitches are much more controlled. It’s hard to pitch it too high or too hard when your arms are locked against your side. It’s easier to maintain good posture during the pivot. The QB’s opening becomes more consistent looking from play to play which improves our deception.

26 QB Coaching Strategies Improving the QB’s Ball Handling Pitch Mechanics Teaching proper pitch mechanics: Belt ‘Em- Use an old football pants belt to wrap around your QB’s arms and torso. This should strap his elbows into his sides. The object is to force his pitches to come from about waist level. -Have him perform several pitches to you from a stationary position. - Set him in ‘snap’ position with a ball in hand. Have him pivot towards you and deliver a pitch. - Tip The object here is to have him simply “let go” of the ball during his pivot using a minimum of force from his arms to propel the ball. The momentum from the pivot should be sufficient to deliver a controlled pitch.

27 QB Coaching Strategies Improving the QB’s Ball Handling Pitch Mechanics Teaching proper pitch mechanics: Seat, Pivot, and Pitch- Set him in ‘snap’ position to receive a snap from a kneeling coach. -Have him take the snap, seat the ball, and pivot towards you but do not deliver a pitch, just keep the ball seated. - Once he has that mastered - - Have him perform the same operation. This time tell him to let his momentum deliver the ball from the seated position to you in a controlled pitch….Rinse and repeat as necessary.

28 QB Coaching Strategies Improving the QB’s Ball Handling- Ball Security / Footwork / Deception / Pitch Mechanics Improving the QB’s Passing Game Keeping it Real / Accuracy / The Supporting Cast / Play Structure / Drills

29 QB Coaching Strategies Improving the QB’s Passing Game Keeping It Real  Like the DW’s running game, it’s passing game is most effective when methodically applied. Know what your cues for passing are and apply them in game situations.  Teach a passing game that accommodates as many of your teams strengths…and just as importantly their weakness’…as possible.  Be dogged in your application of a limited passing playbook. Play design and repetition are the keys to a DW’s passing success, not play volume or diversity.  Pass practice must be considered every bit as important as run practice. If you spend 10 minutes a day perfecting the Power play, you ought to be spending 10 minutes a day perfecting your best pass play also.

30 QB Coaching Strategies Improving the QB’s Passing Game Keeping It Real  It’s usually better to design a pass that consistently gets one kid open than it is to design a pass that sometimes gets two kids open. The younger the players, the more this is true. Youth QBs don’t often successfully cycle through 2 or 3 downfield receivers so if #1 ain’t open, teach them to run.  Keep it age appropriate. Don’t try to teach 4 receiver reads, or how to recognize inverted C2 to a 12 year old QB. Inversely, these are things one would expect from a HS or College DW QB.  Hands! Hands! Hands! IMO- It’s much easier to find a kid who can pass consistently than it is to find a kid who can catch consistently. Find and develop the kids who can catch early in the season and focus on their development as receivers.

31 QB Coaching Strategies Improving the QB’s Passing Game Accuracy Generally, I try to develop my QB’s accuracy before his arm strength. My goal is to have him consistently throw passes on target in the yard range. (Less for young kids, more for older kids) I take three basic approaches to accomplishing this. 1- Play/Route choice and design. 2- Landmark passing 3- Focused use of drills and skellies that primarily emphasize the routes we will be throwing to in games. The ability to dependably throw the ball to a spot where the receiver can catch it.

32 QB Coaching Strategies Improving the QB’s Passing Game Accuracy Play / Route choice and design Every QB has some routes that he throws well and some that he doesn’t. For example- Short QBs sometimes have difficulty seeing over the offensive line. Which means they can have problems seeing receivers that cross the middle of the defense….That makes it harder to throw Post, Seam, and Square In type routes. The solution (for me) is to use routes that work the edges of the defense (Corner, Out, Fade, Fly, etc.) and to have the QB work from the edge of the pocket using a semi or full roll out whenever possible. The problems and solutions may be different for you, but the basic concept is the same. Design the plays and routes you use around what your QB does well…Don’t add more plays, tweak the ones you have.

33 QB Coaching Strategies Improving the QB’s Passing Game Accuracy Play / Route choice and design There are many ways to run the play action pass off of the Power action. The best choice is always the one that uses the routes that your QB throws the best. If my QB is a big athlete with a good arm, I might run it with some kind of middle Post/Smash route. If he throws accurately but not very far, I might use a lot of rub routes. If he’s really slow I may use only semi roll outs…you get the picture.

34 QB Coaching Strategies Improving the QB’s Passing Game Accuracy Landmark Passing When I speak of landmark passing I’m simply referring to the way I teach my QBs and receivers to use defensive “targets” to determine the proper route spacing or throwing lane. Using landmarks simplifies the QB’s job and improves our odds of getting receivers open. On most of the passes I use, I teach my QB’s to throw “to a spot” as opposed to the receiver…Always aiming ahead of the receiver and to his outside or up field shoulder depending on the route. This target area is the QB’s passing landmark. I want my receivers to be able to “run to” these passes. The object is not to throw 30 yard laser shots to the receivers, it is to throw passes into spots that only our receiver can get to. Whenever possible, I have my receivers use a similar method of landmarking the defense to determine their route spacing and aiming points.

35 QB Coaching Strategies Improving the QB’s Passing Game Accuracy Landmark Passing- QB On any pass that is “going away” from the QB (Corner, Post, Seam, Fade, Deep Out, Fly, etc) the pass is delivered to a spot ahead of, and to the outside or up field shoulder of the receiver allowing him to “run to” the ball. QB X A landmark pass is delivered ahead and over the outside/up field shoulder of the receiver QB X Corner Post

36 QB Coaching Strategies Improving the QB’s Passing Game Accuracy Landmark Passing- Receivers Receivers will often use defensive landmarks also. Example: When running Corner routes, I will frequently tell my WBs and TEs to split the distance between the CB and the deepest man on their side of the field, then arc their route through that midpoint. B CB TT B NEE S “Landmark” Corner vs. C1 S CB TT B NEE S “Landmark” Corner vs. C2

37 QB Coaching Strategies Improving the QB’s Passing Game Accuracy Landmark Passing- Receivers Sometimes I will also landmark the defensive players themselves. Good examples of this is when I use rub routes, or when I’m trying to occupy a defender with one man in order to get a specific other man open behind him. B CB TT B NEE S “Landmarking the CB and S” vs. C1 S C B TT B NEE S “Landmarking the S + a Landmark Corner route” vs. C2

38 QB Coaching Strategies Improving the QB’s Passing Game Accuracy Focus your pass practice (receiver lines, pat-n-go, etc.) on the routes you will be using in games…It is a waste of time to practice completing Post and Drag routes if your circumstances prevent you from using them in games. Try not to add more pass plays to your playbook in order to accommodate what any given QB can do. Instead, tweak your existing plays to suit the abilities of your athlete…Just like in our running game, less is better. Receivers!! - These kids can make a QB look great or awful. Receivers have a lot to do with how “accurate” your QB is. The better you coach your receivers, the better your QB will be. Some closing thoughts on improving a QB’s accuracy

39 QB Coaching Strategies Improving the QB’s Passing Game The Supporting Cast Good play from the QB is completely dependant on good play from his team mates. Lineman that block poorly, receivers that don’t concentrate, and coaches who make stupid decisions…These are the things that lead to a lot of sacks, picks, and muffed exchanges that could have otherwise been avoided. Therefore it follows that if we expect our QB to perform, we must expect everyone around him to perform to perform as well.

40 QB Coaching Strategies Improving the QB’s Passing Game The Supporting Cast Proper O-Line technique is a huge topic that is well outside the scope of this presentation but it does merit a certain amount of discussion due to it’s effect on the QB’s game. Offensive Line My suggestion is always to use a minimum of pass protection schemes. I personally use just 2 pass protection schemes for 95% of my pass plays. IMO- The offensive line is the single biggest factor in determining the success or failure of your passing game. The greatest QB in the world can’t throw the ball (or even hand it off) if he has defenders draped all over him.

41 QB Coaching Strategies Improving the QB’s Passing Game The Supporting Cast Offensive Line There are at least two pass blocking schemes out there that mesh perfectly with the DW’s play action based passing game. Hinge or Moving Pocket protection Bootleg protection Every DW coach should find a way to employ at least one of these.

42 QB Coaching Strategies Improving the QB’s Passing Game The Supporting Cast Offensive Line / Hinge Blocking Play side blocks Gap-On-Reach. Back side hinges back- Each man gets progressively deeper. Everyone works their man toward the backside of the play. Backside TE is responsible for backside EMLOS. WB or FB is responsible for play side EMLOS. B EETT B BB Backside WB picks up Play side DE. Best w/ Full Roll Out B EETT B BB FB picks up Play side DE. Best w/ Semi Roll Out.

43 QB Coaching Strategies Improving the QB’s Passing Game The Supporting Cast Offensive Line / Bootleg Blocking Play side TE release if assigned a route, block down if not. Play side T blocks down. Play side G pulls deep to play side for the EMLOS. Back side hinges back- Everyone works their man toward the backside of the play. Backside TE is responsible for backside EMLOS. B EETT B BB Bootleg blocking should only be used with a full Roll Out.

44 QB Coaching Strategies Improving the QB’s Passing Game The Supporting Cast Receivers As I mentioned earlier. I’ve always found it more difficult to find good receivers than good QBs… It’s hard to teach a kid with terrible hands to catch a ball with consistency. For these reasons I focus intensely on finding kids who can catch as early as possible in the pre-season. I never wait until I’m ready to install my first pass play to start looking for (and teaching) my receivers. Fortunately, it usually turns out that our best runners are some of our best receivers too. If we can find 2 or 3 other kids that can be developed, we’ll have a pretty good foundation for a receiver corps.

45 You can usually expect to find a couple of kids with naturally good hands. Then there’s usually another 6 or 7 or so that have average hands and might develop into good receivers. From all of these kids I usually select the best 6 or 8 kids. These kids are the ones I will focus my receiver practice time on. QB Coaching Strategies Improving the QB’s Passing Game The Supporting Cast Receivers At one time or another, we are all guilty of sending our MPRs w/ our receiver coach…Don’t Do It! Focus the receiver time only on the kids you’re really going to throw the ball to. MPRs will only rob reps. Instead of having your receiver coach baby sit them, send them to another coach for tackling or blocking practice….As MPRs they probably need that more than pass practice anyway :-) Youth Coach Caveat

46 QB Coaching Strategies Improving the QB’s Passing Game The Supporting Cast Coaching If our expectation is that the QB perform to the requirements of our offense, then it’s our job to create the circumstances that will allow him to do so. Adapt your system to meet the abilities of your QB rather than having him adapt his abilities to your system. Every one of us has made a stupid coaching decision before…every one of us will make more of them in the future. The trick is recognizing when you made one… then trying not to make it again. Be Prepared - Know what it is you want to do. - Know how you want to do it - Know what it is that needs to be fixed when it doesn’t work. - FILM IS YOUR BEST FRIEND…It sees every mistake, and reveals every bad decision. Use it and learn from it.

47 QB Coaching Strategies Improving the QB’s Passing Game Play Structure Pass plays should be structured so that your QB has the highest possible chance of throwing a pass with little or no defensive pressure to a receiver that is open downfield….that’s the goal anyway. When putting together a new play or tweaking an existing one, I try to stick to a certain set of self imposed limitations. If later I discover that my athletes are capable of performing above those limitations, I can adjust them upwards then. Build confidence first…get fancy later. A Few Examples: - I never use less than 7 men in pass protection. - I never like to give my QB more than 2 receiver options before I want him to tuck and run. That does not mean I never use more than 2 receivers. - I prefer Rub routes over Combo routes. - Any “passing” formations I use must be able to also support at least the Power, Trap, Wedge, and G plays.

48 QB Coaching Strategies Improving the QB’s Passing Game Drills

49 QB Coaching Strategies Improving the QB’s Passing Game Drill Landmark Passing QB This helps teach my QBs to be consistent with their ball placement. Have your QB stand 5 yards behind an imaginary LOS. Tell him to throw the ball as far as he can from there at a 45˚ angle. Mark the spot where the ball first lands. Repeat this with a throw straight up field. These are his “max” distances. Now- Move those markers 15 yards closer and have him throw until he can can land several consecutive balls (you pick the #) within a 1 yard radius of the markers. Then move it 5 yards back and repeat the exercise. Repeat until you have reached a distance that is 5 yards less than his original max throw. X X X Initial (max) distance 2nd Test Distance 1st Test Distance X X

50 QB Coaching Strategies Improving the QB’s Passing Game Drill Pass Reaction QB Rec 1Rec 2 -A QB and 2 receivers align on the LOS. Receivers are numbered 1 and 2 -QB is assigned a play action (5 step drop, semi or full roll out). -Each receiver is given a different route. -2nd QB or coach kneels opposite the QB to deliver a ‘snap’ -On cadence, all three execute their assignment. -Just prior to the QB completing his play action (1 or 2 steps remaining) the coach calls out the route he wants the ball thrown to. -The QB should plant, set and deliver the ball to the designated receiver. This is not a “route reading” drill. It is for teaching decisive reactions and quick delivery coach “2!”

51 QB Coaching Strategies Improving the QB’s Passing Game Drill Handoff lines -2 single file lines of ball carriers face each other, offset by 1 yard and about 5 yards apart. - The first runner in each line jogs toward the opposite line. One carries a football. -The two runners perform a handoff at the midpoint between the two lines. -As soon as the handoff occurs the lead runner in the line facing the man with the ball takes off. -The exchange is repeated and the cycle begins again. A simple and classic old drill. Just as beneficial to QBs as it is to running backs. X X

52 QB QB Coaching Strategies Improving the QB’s Passing Game Drill Passing Lines Nothing beats repetition for teaching a QB how to complete any given pass. coach -1 single file line of receivers with a QB on the LOS. Coach or 2nd QB kneels opposite to deliver the snap. - On the QB’s cadence the first receiver in the line runs the designated route. - QB takes the snap, executes the correct drop, and delivers the ball -Have two QBs alternate throwing and snapping. - This focused time for just the routes you’ll be using in your game.

53 QB Coaching Strategies Improving the QB’s Passing Game Drill Hot box A great quick release and timing drill. Great for QBs and receivers alike. -1 single file line of 5 or 6 receivers spaced about 2 yards apart - 2 QBs facing the receivers and 10 yards away. Each has a ball. - The QBs randomly alternate who they throw to, never throwing to the same guy two times in a row. -Once a receiver has caught a ball he must immediately deliver it right back to one of the QBs. -Keep this at a brisk pace. QB

54 QB Coaching Strategies Improving the QB’s Passing Game Drill Visualizing the ball’s movement This is not really a drill but it is a handy way to teach QBs how to handle the ball on any given play Running & Blocking Drills Everything I talked about in ‘04 Dallas Symposium applies here. For coaching points and techniques for teaching your QB how to run and block, see that presentation

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