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A Practice-Based Model for Preparing Noyce Candidates for Success in High-Needs Schools Dr. Kevin Carr & Chris Pokorny Pacific University, Woodburn, OR.

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Presentation on theme: "A Practice-Based Model for Preparing Noyce Candidates for Success in High-Needs Schools Dr. Kevin Carr & Chris Pokorny Pacific University, Woodburn, OR."— Presentation transcript:

1 A Practice-Based Model for Preparing Noyce Candidates for Success in High-Needs Schools Dr. Kevin Carr & Chris Pokorny Pacific University, Woodburn, OR Seventh Annual NSF Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program Conference Building Excellence in STEM Teaching Washington, DC – May 25, 2012

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3 Main Campus 1849 Woodburn Campus May, 2012

4 Essential Questions How can we make student learning the driver of STEM teacher preparation? How can teacher education move candidates farther toward the 10,000 hours of intense practice needed to become experts? Is becoming a STEM teacher more like becoming an astronomer or an astrologer?

5 Tony’s Tale Tony, a recent STEM college graduate, went into The Noyce program thinking he would get the MAT degree and go straight into full-time teaching. He was successful in the MAT program, but in the end decided not to go into full-time teaching. We interviewed Tony to try to better understand his choice to not become a full-time teacher.

6 Tony’s Tale Q: Describe your reasons for not becoming a full-time teacher. I am a very self-critical individual, and I put a lot of pressure on myself. I had a vision of how I wanted to teach and I pursued that vision. It involved a ton of work, which I’m not opposed to doing, but also lot of stress, not a lot of sleep. So those factors combined to make me not enjoy the teaching aspects of being a teacher.

7 Tony’s Tale Q: Describe your experience in the MAT program. What I loved about the MAT program was that they got me to think about education, and primarily science education, in a new way. And, not necessarily in a way that I learned it. I bought into that way of learning, that university, and specifically in the science education part of the program. I dug it a 100%, and I tried to implement a lot of it during my student teaching because there weren’t a whole lot of materials out there.

8 Tony’s Tale Q: Can you describe more about your student teaching experience? I had the framework for teaching that I was really happy with. And I had to develop a lot of curriculum on my own. I wasn’t happy with the curriculum that was out there in my field. So I tried to take it on myself to develop that curriculum so that the students have an investigative, inquiry-based system to follow. But, that development of curriculum took all of the time, and a lot of stress came about from when I saw that the way that I designed the materials didn’t work or students didn’t get out what I hoped they would. It made it harder to develop my own curriculum every day; that wore me down over time.

9 Tony’s Tale Q: Can you talk more about the curriculum you found in your placement? I wouldn’t have felt good about just using materials that already exist because I would have seen so many things within that curriculum that I didn’t like and that didn’t fit well with this vision of science education that I developed during the program, thanks to the professors and the content of the masters’ program. I would have felt it was a cop out.

10 Tony’s Tale Q: What experiences or activities might have helped you stick to you initial decision to become a teacher? I had a vision in general of what science education should be like, or could be like, in the school. But, I guess the gap between having that framework for what science education should be and then developing a curriculum and day-to-day plans to execute that vision, that’s where… I can’t define an activity, but if there were something to better bridge that gap between this generalized vision of science education and then executing it with specific content material so there were more experiences to developing materials or adapting materials.

11 Our Traditional MAT Program Semester BlockCoursework (on campus)Fieldwork (in schools) Summer-FoundationsLearning Communities I School and Society Teacher as Researcher Educational Psychology none Fall-MethodsLearning Communities II Learning Technology Disciplinary Literacy STEM Pedagogy General Pedagogy STEM Curriculum Design Observation 2 days/week, one at MS and one at HS Spring-ApplicationLearning Communities III9 weeks student teaching MS + 9 weeks MS

12 Our Traditional MAT Program Semester BlockCoursework (on campus)Fieldwork (in schools) Summer-FoundationsLearning Communities I School and Society Teacher as Researcher Educational Psychology none Fall-MethodsLearning Communities II Learning Technology Disciplinary Literacy STEM Pedagogy General Pedagogy STEM Curriculum Design Observation 2 days/week, one at MS and one at HS Spring-ApplicationLearning Communities III9 weeks student teaching MS + 9 weeks MS

13 Program (Re) Design Principles (AACTE, NCATE) 1.Student learning is the focus. 2.Collaborative work in an interactive professional community is the core experience around which preparation is woven. 3.Successful candidates become innovators, collaborators, and problem solvers in their teaching careers. 4.A successful program creates mutually satisfying and productive partnerships between teacher educators and K-12 personnel.

14 Woodburn STEM MAT Practice-Based Prototype Semester BlockCoursework (at field classroom) Fieldwork (in schools) Summer-FoundationsLearning Communities I School and Society Teacher as Researcher Educational Psychology Ethnographic study of community and district Fall-MethodsLearning Communities II Learning Technology Disciplinary Literacy STEM Pedagogy General Pedagogy STEM Curriculum Design Rotation 1: 6 weeks at three different schools Rotation 2: 12 weeks collaborative teaching partnership at one school Spring-ApplicationLearning Communities IIIRotation 3: 18 weeks collaborative teaching partnership at one school

15 Education Methods Courses as Focused Inquiry/Guided Practice What has happened or is happening in relation to [topic], and how does this affect teaching and learning? How does this impact my process of becoming a teacher? Hollins, E. (2011). Preparation for Quality Teaching. Journal of Teacher Education, 62(4), 395-407.

16 Focused Inquiry Inquiries may take place in a number of contexts, including: The university classroom The local community The school The STEM classroom The Self

17 Guided Practice Guided Practice involves experimentation with planning and teaching a short instructional sequence for a small group of students under careful supervision of university faculty, mentor teacher(s), and peers. Guided practice may be co-planned and taught by any combination of the above participants. Guided practice should be designed so that, after teaching, candidates are able to analyze, interpret, and deconstruct the outcomes, and ultimately re- teach.

18 Collaborative Teaching Partnerships Student teaching comprises a collaborative teaching partnership between mentor teachers, teacher candidates, and university faculty, whose purpose is to increase student learning.

19 Collaborative Teaching Partnerships One teach, one observe – purposeful observation for feedback, teaching, and evidence of student learning. One teach, one assist – one teacher provides assistance as needed to students around the classroom while the other leads the entire group. Co-teaching – both teachers simultaneously lead the same range of content to groups of students. Station teaching – both teachers lead different content to groups of students who rotate from one teacher to the next. One teach – student teacher fully responsible for student learning without the mentor teacher in the room. One teach to the whole group, one teach one-on-one – the teacher working with one student could work within in the classroom or in another learning setting.

20 Collaborative Teaching Partnerships One teach, one observe – purposeful observation for feedback, teaching, and evidence of student learning. One teach, one assist – one teacher provides assistance as needed to students around the classroom while the other leads the entire group. Co-teaching – both teachers simultaneously lead the same range of content to groups of students. Station teaching – both teachers lead different content to groups of students who rotate from one teacher to the next. One teach – student teacher fully responsible for student learning without the mentor teacher in the room. One teach to the whole group, one teach one-on-one – the teacher working with one student could work within in the classroom or in another learning setting.

21 Student Teacher Action Research Candidates complete their own Focused Inquiry on a critical question of their choice. How can I help students re-learn basic math skills as they approach algebra? How can learn better classroom communication skills as a student teacher? How can I use formative assessment probes to attend to student thinking in my classes?

22 Program (Re) Design Principles 1.Student learning is the focus. 2.Collaborative work in an interactive professional community is the core experience around which preparation is woven. 3.Successful candidates become innovators, collaborators, and problem solvers in their teaching careers. 4.A successful program creates mutually satisfying and productive partnerships between teacher educators and K-12 personnel.

23 Woodburn STEM MAT Practice-Based Prototype Semester BlockCoursework (at field classroom) Fieldwork (in schools) Summer-FoundationsLearning Communities I School and Society Teacher as Researcher Educational Psychology Ethnographic study of community and district Fall-MethodsLearning Communities II Learning Technology Disciplinary Literacy STEM Pedagogy General Pedagogy STEM Curriculum Design Rotation 1: 6 weeks at three different schools Rotation 2: 12 weeks collaborative teaching partnership at one school Spring-ApplicationLearning Communities IIIRotation 3: 18 weeks collaborative teaching partnership at one school

24 Woodburn STEM MAT Practice-Based Prototype Semester BlockCoursework (at field classroom) Fieldwork (in schools) Summer-FoundationsLearning Communities I School and Society Teacher as Researcher Educational Psychology Ethnographic study of community and district Fall-MethodsLearning Communities II Learning Technology Disciplinary Literacy STEM Pedagogy General Pedagogy STEM Curriculum Design Rotation 1: 6 weeks at three different schools Rotation 2: 12 weeks collaborative teaching partnership at one school Spring-ApplicationLearning Communities IIIRotation 3: 18 weeks collaborative teaching partnership at one school

25 Woodburn STEM MAT Practice-Based Prototype Semester BlockPractice-Based Work to Improve Student Learning Summer-FoundationsLearning Communities I School and Society Teacher as Researcher Educational Psychology Ethnographic study of community and district Fall-MethodsLearning Communities II Learning Technology Disciplinary Literacy STEM Pedagogy General Pedagogy STEM Curriculum Design Rotation 1: 6 weeks at three different schools Rotation 2: 12 weeks collaborative teaching partnership at one school Spring-ApplicationLearning Communities IIIRotation 3: 18 weeks collaborative teaching partnership at one school Teacher Inquiry, and Collaborative, Guided Practice

26 Essential Questions How can we make student learning the driver of STEM teacher preparation? How can teacher education move candidates farther toward the 10,000 hours of intense practice needed to become experts? Is becoming a powerful STEM teacher more like becoming an astronomer or an astrologer?

27 What’s Next? New cohort of Woodburn MAT Noyce Scholars Opening Pacific Woodburn Campus Site Woodburn Regional STEM Education Partnership Coming in 2013: ESOL endorsement folded into the STEM MAT program


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