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Safe Mobility Planning January 21, 2015 4:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. ET CM l 1.5.

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Presentation on theme: "Safe Mobility Planning January 21, 2015 4:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. ET CM l 1.5."— Presentation transcript:

1 Safe Mobility Planning January 21, :00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. ET CM l 1.5

2 Today’s Speakers Madeline Brozen Assistant Director, Lewis Center for Regional Policy Studies Assistant Director, Institute of Transportation Studies Program Manager, Complete Streets Initiative UCLA Stefanie Seskin (Moderator) Deputy Director National Complete Streets Coalition Smart Growth America

3 Today’s Speakers Daniel Goodman Office of Human Environment Livability Team Federal Highway Administration Meghan F. Mitman, AICP Senior Associate and San Francisco Office Operations Manager Fehr and Peers Chair, ITE Complete Streets Council

4 Today’s Speakers Gabe Rousseau, PhD Safety Operations Team Leader Office of Safety Technologies Federal Highway Administration

5 1. Data and Research: What Do We Know? 2. How Planners Can Learn From Data 3. Meeting the Needs of All Users 4. Thinking Beyond User Safety 5. Public Engagement 6. Performance Measures 7. Q&A Today’s Audio/Web Conference

6 Question One What do we know about safety issues when pedestrians, bicyclists, transit, and vehicles share streets? What questions should communities be asking and what information should they be examining?

7 Federal Data

8 Local Sources

9 Question Two Are there significant trends emerging from this data that would influence how a community would approach a street project or a community transportation plan?

10 What’s Trending Karen Foto, Flickr "Midtown Greenway-Minneapolis-2007" Micah Taylor, Wikimedia Commons

11 What’s Trending

12 Question Three The USDOT has launched a comprehensive bike-walk safety initiative, with participation from all modes: driving, freight, motor carriers, transit, walking, bicycling. Can you tell us more about that initiative?

13 Federal Initiative “This initiative is aimed at reversing the recent rise in deaths and injuries among the growing number of Americans who bicycle or walk to work, to reach public transportation and to other important destinations.” Transportation Secretary, Anthony Foxx- WikiMedia Commons

14 Road Diets Richard Drdul, WikiMedia Commons

15 Question Four How is the research helping to inform planning?

16 Collecting Data at All Levels Ben Leitschuh

17 Question Five We have discussed the data that is available to inform planning. Now, please explain how transportation planners begin looking at and planning for this issue?

18 Reactive Vs. Pro-active Pro-active programs are better at preventing injury and death Use research from a variety of sources

19 Partner With Public Health

20 Question Six What is going on in practice that is helping to make community transportation safer? How have the needs of older adults been addressed?

21 Designing for Seniors FHWA Handbook for Designing Roadways for the Aging Population Marcel Oosterwijk, Flickr USDOT, FHWA 2014

22 Question Seven What about the needs of children? Is current federal legislation addressing these concerns?

23 What About the Children? Pixabay

24 Question Eight What are some of the other issues besides users? What about connectivity?

25 Connections Complete Streets Council Connecting modes Connecting modes Coordinating between engineers and planners Coordinating between engineers and planners Design guidance Design guidance

26 Question Nine Gabe, you have observed that there are other dimensions to issues of safety in transportation planning. Can you give us an example?

27 Socio-Economics Ngo Trung, Wikimedia Commons Raybay, 2014 Futureatlas.com, Flickr

28 Question Ten We have considered what the research tells us and who is affected, but where does a community begin a process that leads to more complete and safe streets?

29 Getting Started “Tech Transfer provides free Pedestrian Safety Assessments, in which evaluators will review your city or county's pedestrian safety conditions, programs, and needs, and suggest new strategies to improve pedestrian safety” Pixabay

30

31 Question Eleven Almost everyone agrees that safety should be the priority for transportation projects, but what about when you have to make trade-offs? How do you ensure a transparent process?

32 Trade-Offs and Transparency Focus investments where they are most needed Prioritize near schools, parks, assisted living centers, community centers, etc. Prioritize projects that can result in safer environment for all users Define the goals in the purpose & need statement to clearly encompass safety for all users, including those walking and bicycling Listen to the community’s residents Document the design choices to show why tradeoffs were made Biswarup Ganguly, WikiMedia

33 Los Angeles Mind Mixer

34 Question Twelve Engaging the public, both in understanding the issues and in actual planning is important. What insights can you share on engagement?

35 FEMA Photo Library Engagement

36 Question Thirteen How we set goals and measure the way in which we meet those goals is changing. One way of doing this is using performance measures, but there are other measures as well. Can you explain more about performance measures.

37 Performance and Beyond Performance measures can be used at different points: Long-term investment plans (20- year)—measuring return on investment of different big-picture funding decisions Project identification and selection Alternatives analysis Making decisions during final design Project evaluation—looking at impact

38 Question Fourteen What are some of the other kinds of measures that communities should consider as way of achieving their goals?

39 Measuring Success? SB 743 CEQA Guidelines Transportation Metric Update

40 Alternatives to LOS National Transportation Safety Board

41 Question Fifteen We talked about engagement earlier, and now I want to talk about partnerships that can and should enhance the work of planners and planning. Can you describe some examples?

42 Partnerships

43 More Partnerships National Cancer Institute David Hilowitz, Flickr Duke Chapel, WikiMedia Rex Pe, WikiMedia JezW, WikiMedia Leon Roberts, WikiMedia

44 Question Sixteen What piece of advice or insight would you like to leave our audience with?

45 Closing Thoughts Madeline Brozen Assistant Director, Lewis Center for Regional Policy Studies Assistant Director, Institute of Transportation Studies Program Manager, Complete Streets Initiative UCLA Stefanie Seskin (Moderator) Deputy Director National Complete Streets Coalition Smart Growth America

46 Closing Thoughts Daniel Goodman Office of Human Environment Livability Team Federal Highway Administration Meghan F. Mitman, AICP Senior Associate and San Francisco Office Operations Manager Fehr and Peers Chair, ITE Complete Streets Council

47 Q&A


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