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Christine Kerlin Senior Consultant, AACRAO Retired: Vice President, University Center and Strategic Planning Everett Community College, WA WSSSC Workshop.

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Presentation on theme: "Christine Kerlin Senior Consultant, AACRAO Retired: Vice President, University Center and Strategic Planning Everett Community College, WA WSSSC Workshop."— Presentation transcript:

1 Christine Kerlin Senior Consultant, AACRAO Retired: Vice President, University Center and Strategic Planning Everett Community College, WA WSSSC Workshop Clover Park Technical College Lakewood, Washington October 10,

2  Does your institution need to get on the road to managing its enrollment? Have you started the engine but can't seem to get traction? Whether your institution is seeking to increase enrollment or manage shifting enrollments this session will provide an outline for a process that gets you on track. Concerned about outreach, retention, completion, student services program mix, curricular offerings, and new student demographics? Come prepared to learn, share and discuss.  If you are already on a productive SEM road, please share your tips for success. 2

3  Logistics  Who is here?  Ask questions, share experiences  Our goal – essential steps and an action plan ◦ History, concepts, structure, planning 3

4 As a concept, Enrollment Management was born in the early 1970s at Boston College.  The growing research & theories of student departure (retention).  The emerging sensitivity to marketing in student recruitment & in higher education generally.  A focus on the traditional full-time undergraduate students  The 1980s enrollment crisis in higher education. Marketing 4

5  An emphasis on integrating financial aid, pricing, and net revenue planning  Inclusion of adult, part-time, & graduate enrollments  The explosion of information technology  Increasing and changing competition  A mushrooming consulting industry  The emergence of substantive literature and professional status. Integration 5

6 Enrollment Management evolves as a strategic component of institutional planning….  Instructional programs and services designed with intentionality, purpose, integration of effort, service efficiency, and positive interventions with students.  Integrated cross-campus collaborations and partnerships between faculty, administrators, and staff.  Use of assessment and information-driven decision making.  Understanding how campus cultures impact enrollment management efforts.  Importance of shared leadership at multiple levels. Strategy 6 See “Leading Up” at: of-managing-your-boss/

7 Industrial Age  Teaching franchise  Information infrastructure as a support tool  Separate learning systems  Silos  Bureaucratic systems  Rigid pre-designed processes Information Age  Learning franchise  Information infrastructure as instrument of transformation  Fused learning systems  Big tent  Self-informing, self-correcting systems  Families of transactions customized to needs of learners, faculty, staff Fusion 7

8 8  Increasing competition from other learning organizations that utilize e-tools more effectively than we do, and package their content to meet demand for non-traditional, online and global delivery.  These new learning organizations are emphasizing the high volume, low-cost options.  Our own public baccalaureates are moving into workforce training and the adult market – our bread and butter.  Our regional demographics are shifting away from – or adding to - our “known zone”. Fewer traditional-age students, aging adults, more traditionally under-represented populations. EXTERNAL:

9 9  Affordability. How will families and independent students assess cost and value?  A complex funding environment for institutions AND students  The public, and students, have high expectations of service, of product, of performance, of affordability, of outcomes. Students and families are “consumers”. EXTERNAL:

10 10 INTERNAL:  Our budgets and our organizational structures are stretched. ◦ High enrollment produced more staff/classes, low enrollment forces decisions. ◦ Too many committees?  Fluctuating enrollments, stressed staff and systems.  Low level of flexibility with our own workforce structure.  Our enrollment targets and funding are driven within a political model. Our enrollment targets are getting sliced and diced.  Evolving into CTCLink. Our internal understanding of how our databases “really” work may be imperfect. Our uses of data to schedule courses, analyze viability or need or demand, may be imperfect.

11 11 INTERNAL:  Achieving viable program mix to a) serve, b) meet goals, and c) respond to the realities of our own institution. ◦ Inability to rapidly adjust curriculum. ◦ Accommodating various non-competitive rules in our systems. ◦ To “bacc” or not to “bacc”, or how to “bacc”?  The pressure serving underprepared students and special populations.  The dynamics of Change Management.  And, here’s a big one: Does your Institutional Strategic Plan provide some direction to your enrollment planning?  You can name more….. Facilities, space availability, scheduling?

12  It is most helpful to express them as issues. An issue statement implies an impact and a need to respond. “Funding” vs “State funding has stabilized but tuition income has decreased to the extent that we cannot meet our current costs.” ◦ “We need to attract more students” vs “Our enrollment declines are seen in recent high school graduates enrolling in Fall, and in low enrollments in our manufacturing tech programs, and in our criminal justice program.” 12 A real example from one of your websites: “Technology” As the need for costly, up-to-date technology continues to grow, the college should: Provide professional development training in new technologies for faculty and staff. Maintain sufficient capacity and appropriate infrastructure to support e-learning and data collection activities. Develop new platforms that best serve the technology needs of students and staff.

13  Realigning the organization with its changing environment  Redesigning the organization, its structure and tools  Redefining individual roles and responsibilities  Reengineering processes in the transformational context …“Culture” is a big factor 13

14 Adapted from: A Matter of Culture and Leadership: Student Success in State Colleges and Universities, AASCU, 2005 Attributes of Campus CultureSEM Opportunity Pervasive attitude to not be content to rest on past success during an era of change, but lack of consensus on how to move forward.  Leadership, information A strongly held sense of mission (whatever it is) that recognizes the campus as “distinctive” or “special.” “The people are special.”  Communication Sense of – or wish for - inclusiveness on the part of all members of the campus community frequently characterized as a “family.”  Build on strengths For some: Concern about financial support and viability.  Data, analysis, planning 14

15  Enrollment Goals  Instructional Program Mix – type and mode  Quest for Quality  Increase Diversity  Ensuring Access and Affordability  Increasing Net Tuition Revenue  Increasing Retention & Graduation Rates  Improving Student Learning Outcomes  Expansion or contraction of mission 15

16  SEM is a comprehensive process designed to help an institution achieve and maintain optimum enrollment, where optimum is defined within the academic [instructional] context of the institution.  Adapted from SEM Primer  SEM enables the fulfillment of institutional mission and students’ educational goals.  Adapted from Bob Bontrager  Strategic enrollment management is a concept and process that enables the fulfillment of institutional mission and students’ educational goals.  Adapted from Stanley Henderson  Enrollment management is a comprehensive and coordinated process that enables a college to identify enrollment goals that are allied with its mission, its strategic plan, its environment, and its resources, and to reach those goals through the effective integration of administrative processes, student services, curriculum planning, and market analysis.  Christine Kerlin 16

17  SEM is a comprehensive process designed to help an institution achieve and maintain optimum enrollment, where optimum is defined within the academic [instructional] context of the institution.  Adapted from SEM Primer  SEM enables the fulfillment of institutional mission and students’ educational goals.  Adapted from Bob Bontrager  Strategic enrollment management is a concept and process that enables the fulfillment of institutional mission and students’ educational goals.  Adapted from Stanley Henderson  Enrollment management is a comprehensive and coordinated process that enables a college to identify enrollment goals that are allied with its mission, its strategic plan, its environment, and its resources, and to reach those goals through the effective integration of administrative processes, student services, curriculum planning, and market analysis.  Christine Kerlin 17

18 18  SEM is not just a recruitment plan.  SEM is not just a marketing plan.  SEM is not separate from the academic mission of the institution.  SEM is not always about growth.  “SEM is effective integration of administrative processes, student services, curriculum planning, and market analysis.” Myth Busters

19 A SEM Tree Welcome to SEM Hall Professor SEM 19 Or……

20 20 Like this???

21 21  Create a structure for leadership, planning and decision- making with regard to five concerns:  Institutional culture  Governance structure  Enabling the institution to review issues, goals and strategies through these lenses:  curriculum planning  administrative processes  student services  market analysis  Budget decision cycle and involvement of budget decision-makers  The dynamics of Change Management.

22 22  Committee  Coordinator/Matrix  Division

23 23  Working Group (continuous) – ◦ VP Instruction, Deans, Student Services leadership team, Director of Public Information, Publications Director, Director of Institutional Research, Director of Enrollment, International Programs, …other…..  Advisory Group (periodic) – ◦ Running Start, International, Information Technology, Enrollment Services, Financial Aid, Advising, Diversity Services, Publications, Research and Planning, Workforce, Outreach, Career Services, Branch Campuses, TRIO, e-Learning, Faculty representatives…other

24 24  The SEM Committee is best supported through an effective partnership with Instructional Council.  The SEM Committee often spins out a variety of other committees or links to other existing committees. Examples: ◦ Student Success and Retention Committee ◦ Information Technology Planning Group ◦ Research  Needs a presidential charge.

25 25 Instructional Division Student Services Information Services Administrative Services Coordinator To whom does the Coordinator report? Needs a strong Presidential charge.

26 26 Let me tell you about the challenges of this model…

27  Committee ???  Coordinator ???  Division ??? Some assert that structure may be related to your institution’s current perspective on enrollment management, and/or the perceived urgency of your situation…… 27

28 Denial Structural Nominal Tactical Strategic Adapted from Dolence 28

29 29

30 30  Some would argue that an over-emphasis on structure misses the point. (We’ll talk about institutional ethos in a minute….)  Too much emphasis on structure delays the initial action.  For many of us, SEM is an organic, incremental process.  HOWEVER, organizational structure issues tend to come to the fore as you continue to work and re-work your Plan.

31 31

32 “An institution’s academic program is inexorably co-dependent on enrollment management. The quality of the academic program can only be developed and maintained in a stable environment, and stable enrollments are only possible through sound [academic] planning…”Dolence 32

33 Ethos: the distinguishing character, sentiment, moral nature, or guiding beliefs of a person, group, or institution. Merriam-Webster  Institutional Ethos is largely described by and through the academic enterprise.  Locating SEM in the academic enterprise enables SEM to draw from that ethos and to have the validity it needs to work.  Structure needs to be the servant of effective SEM implementation, not the master of it. 33

34 34

35  If SEM reflects institutional identity and culture, it becomes an institution-wide strategy owned by each member of the community.  No individual or office is responsible for enrollment strategy or outcomes. Everyone has responsibility for institutional and student success.  Each member of community takes responsibility for nurturing SEM Ethos, implementation, outcomes. Comprehensive 35

36  As an academic enterprise, SEM can be easily integrated into institutional planning.  If it’s academically centered, SEM will be a defining part of institutional positioning and strategy.  If SEM isn’t part of strategic planning, not much can be accomplished. Integrated 36

37  In SEM Ethos, processes and procedures are more important than structure.  Business practices need to be aligned with academic mission.  Institutions want to test students’ talents in the classroom, not their patience in navigating institutional business practices. Student Success 37

38  Students see enrollment as a seamless process, not as a railroad track with multiple station stops  Enrollment is non-stop rather than stop and go (or even one-stop)  SEM is a big tent view of student expectations: everything is there, but they don’t want to touch what they don’t need Integration 38

39  It doesn’t matter if it makes sense to us: does it make sense to the students?  Why is the student in the institution?  The only way he/she stays in school is for an academic reason.  Retention is academic success.  Processes and procedures should enhance academic success. Student Success 39

40  Enrollment managers struggle with notion of KPIs as indices of institutional health.  In reality, KPIs are placeholders for institutional values and indices of health.  The “Bodies” approach is out of sync with the academic values of the institution. (“Student fit” is in sync.)  If the enrollment manager has an academic understanding of the place, KPIs set themselves. Mission 40

41  With SEM Ethos, SEM has to have research and evaluation plan.  More and more industry standard is data and research—tools of the academy.  EM units cannot continue to do “feel good” programs that can’t show support for academic goals. Evaluation 41

42  SEM is long-term and never finished.  Academic foundation is fluid; so must SEM be.  Academic disciplines change with new research, new paradigms, new interests.  Changes cannot be instantaneous.  There needs to be a run up to the take-off point.  SEM must follow the deliberate path of the long-term academic, not the quick fix of the repairman. 42

43 43

44  Leadership articulates the strategic academic aspirations, goals, needs, and strategies of faculty and students.  If the CEO says, “Enrollment is paramount,” and fails to say, “to the academic mission,” SEM fails.  All must understand that academic well-being is linked to enrollment health. 44

45  enrollment management (lower case) is just managing enrollments.  STRATEGIC Enrollment Management (upper case) happens when enrollment strategies are integrated with the institution’s strategic plan, academic master plan, and its fundamental (academic) mission. 45

46  Top-down communication is necessary to set the tone, but successful implementation of EM requires lateral communication across campus.  EM needs lateral communication to ensure adherence to the institution’s academic ethos.  Communication has to become a part of the culture; it has to express the ethos of the place. 46

47  The institutional academic ethos will set the structure to provide a means for faculty, staff, and students to contribute to SEM.  EM structure grows out of the core of an individual institution; it cannot be transplanted from institution X or Y.  The structure cannot be more important than the cultural foundation itself. 47

48  A community college may have a campus-wide structure.  The research extensive university may have multiple structures in academic units.  The wise enrollment manager(s) will seek to know the academic grounding of the institution and then seek a structure based on that foundation. 48

49  Academic Leadership  Integrated Planning  Lateral Communication  Structure for Participation ◦ Match Structure to the Mission…and it is an academic mission! 49

50  SEM as a structural/managerial focus.  SEM as a planning process.  SEM as a leadership effort. 50

51 Integrating Leadership, Structure, and Planning, 51

52 52 No matter what sort of structure you create, the most important factor is executive and Board leadership. Presidential charge Leadership buy-in College-wide summit Regular communication at leadership meetings

53 -Hossler, Bean & Associates,

54 Recruitment / Marketing Admission Orientation Co-curricular support Degree/goal attainment Academic support Retention Financial support Student’s Experiences Classroom experience Traditional Enrollment Perspective Alumni 54

55 Recruitment / Marketing Admission Orientation Co-curricular support Degree/goal attainment Academic support Retention Financial support Student’s Experiences Classroom experience The SEM Perspective Alumni 55

56 “An institution’s academic program is inexorably co-dependent on enrollment management. The quality of the academic program can only be developed and maintained in a stable environment, and stable enrollments are only possible through sound planning…” Dolence SEM 56

57 57 2.Produce an Environmental Scan – internal and external. SEM requires a data-rich environment 1.Define relationship to the College’s Strategic Plan. How vibrant is your college’s Strategic Plan? Does it provide some direction for enrollment?

58 Environmental Scanning:  Detects scientific, technical, economic, social, and political trends and events important to our institution.  Defines the potential threats, opportunities, or changes for our institution implied by those trends and events.  Promotes a future orientation in the thinking of management and staff.  Alerts leaders and staff to trends that are converging, diverging, speeding up, slowing down, or interacting.  Enables decision-makers to understand current and potential changes taking place in our institutions' internal and external environments.

59 Environmental Scanning: ◦ Provides information everyone can see. It levels the playing field. ◦ Verifies/contradicts/expands anecdotes and fables. ◦ Tests assumptions about future enrollment growth, improvement, etc., against trends in your particular market or area and benchmarks retention/progression/completion data against other institutions of your type:  This helps institutions set reasonable goals that challenge enrollment potential but based upon metrics. ◦ Sets a standard that SEM decision-making will be informed by data and information. ◦ Provides benchmarks.

60 Income and Expense (tuition, program costs) benchmarks: Where do your costs fit within the costs in your market/area? Peers and Competitors: Application, National Student Clearinghouse, ACT/College Board data Trends: Demographics Employment trends by programs or areas, demand for labor Technology International Higher Ed trends: Changes in high school graduation rates, populations in grades K-12 Changes in delivery systems and preferences Regulations and compliance

61 Enrollment trend data for the past five years: Overall size of the institution Demographic trend data (age, ethnicity, geography) Student preparation characteristics Remediation Retention Program profiles: Enrollment, retention, completion, cost, by program Trends in student transfer: In and out

62 Business/industry connections Alumni: Placement, licensure rates Overall satisfaction with the experience Rate of alumni participation (giving, volunteerism) Financial Aid and Scholarship programs: practices, awards Campus and student surveys Facilities plans More. The list is long and is determined by your context

63  Some is quantitative, some is qualitative.  Your ERP or SIS  Surveys, focus groups  Hidden in individual offices of the institution  Census  Government sources: NCES, DOE, state or province coordinating agencies, warehouses  Independent agencies: NCHEMS, WICHE  Local, regional and national economic and workforce agencies  Higher Ed data: Clearinghouse, Inside Higher Ed, University Business, professional associations, consulting agencies (white papers)  K-12 school districts  Web searches  Education literature

64 64 3.Analyze the data, transform it into information. 4.Identify vital issues ◦ This is done in the context of your strategic plan, your mission, and the data analyses that inform your understanding of your position.

65 65 5. Respond to those issues:  Key leverage initiatives  Very important initiatives  Relatively simple initiatives  ….The possibility of low-hanging fruit…..

66 66 6.Set Goals:  enrollment targets  program mix  program delivery  income targets  expenditure limits  services  ? Include Measurements/ Key Performance Indicators Most goals should be measurable Know your baseline data, and measure against it

67 67 7. Develop Strategies  Instructional Program Mix  Recruitment  Marketing  Policies and Procedures  Retention  Financial modeling  Aid and scholarships  Etc. It is so easy to go straight to “strategies”. But you should do your homework first and start with step one.

68 68 8.Establish accountability  Who does what and when?  How is progress measured and documented?

69 69 9.Follow-up and assess. Establish a monitoring and report process 10.Update often – this is not a long range plan...it is a strategic plan. Be strategic! 11. Assure continuous communication with appropriate and interested parties. Check out the Change Management dynamics.

70 70 2.Produce an Environmental Scan 3.Analyze data, transform it into information 4.Identify vital issues 5.Respond to those issues 6.Set goals, measurements 7.Develop strategies 8.Establish accountabilities, timeline, etc. 9.Follow-up and assess 10.Update often, especially Environmental Scan 11.Assure continuous communication 1.Define relationship to the College’s Strategic Plan

71 A Plan is not forever……  The environment changes.  Your issues change.  Your Strategic Plan is tweaked.  You have new leadership.  Your metrics are not working.  You have learned how to do it better. 71

72  How can your structure help the institution stay strategic? ◦ Annual environmental scan ◦ Regular data tracking ◦ Regular consultation ◦ Continuously engage knowledgeable stakeholders or ongoing committee members ◦ Built in accountability process  Who does this???? 72

73  Do you have buy-in? (Brief sermon on incremental SEM)  What about structure?  How will you approach identifying the issues?  How will you link to the Institutional Strategic Plan?  What are your next steps? 73

74  Adjust your issues.  Clean up your data collection and analysis.  Shorten the Plan.  Re-think (or strengthen) your structure: are you really integrated with Instruction?  Re-write and gain buy-in. and keep on going….. 74

75  Organize around a compelling purpose  Be careful to build trust and secure by-in  Be consistent with your institutional mission  Carefully assess the environment  Keep your goals and objectives manageable and to the point  Constantly evaluate your progress Success of the SEM plan = the measured outcomes + the process itself 75

76  Take the lessons of this workshop and season them with the salt of your institutional environment.  Look for low-hanging fruit as you practice the theory and apply the template of SEM.  Develop SEM through the process of collaboration.  Understand that culture does not change easily, but progress comes to those who dare to begin.  Incrementalism in the pursuit of progress is no vice. 76

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