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Democratic Theory of Education.  b. 1897 in Vienna, Austria; d. 1972  Earned medical degree from the University of Vienna.  Worked with family and.

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Presentation on theme: "Democratic Theory of Education.  b. 1897 in Vienna, Austria; d. 1972  Earned medical degree from the University of Vienna.  Worked with family and."— Presentation transcript:

1 Democratic Theory of Education

2  b in Vienna, Austria; d  Earned medical degree from the University of Vienna.  Worked with family and child counseling.  moved to America in 1937  Became director of psychiatrics at the Alfred Alder Institute of Chicago.  Professor of psychiatrics at Chicago Medical School.  Became an expert in classroom behavior through his books:  Psychology in the Classroom (1968)  Discipline Without Tears coauthored with Pearl Cassel (1972, 1995)  Logical Consequences coauthored with Loren Grey (1995)  Maintaining Sanity in the Classroom coauthored with Bernice Grunwald and Floy Pepper (1982, 1988)

3  Autocratic Teacher: Domineering; Controlling and proponent of harsh consequences.  Causes a student to feel challenged and needing to retaliate.  Ineffective in helping students to learn to discipline themselves.  Permissive Teachers: Soft; Does little to reign in inappropriate behaviors making various excuses for said behaviors.  Allows students to control classes on their own terms.  Students do not learn that freedoms are linked with responsibilities.  Hampers the development of self-discipline.  Democratic Teacher: Motivational; reaches out to the student as an independent, thinking entity.  Recognizes that the student can make appropriate decisions given the opportunity and responsibility.  Teaches freedom coupled with responsible action.  Helps the student develop self-discipline.

4 …students wish to belong in some way or another somewhere. Though, when such a desire goes unanswered, the student will find a way to acquire some sense community… …even if it is disruptive and/or destructive.  Mistaken Goals  Getting Attention: unrelated questions, continual assistance, hovering  Seeking Power: argumentative, lying, contrary  Seeking Revenge: violent, bravado  Displaying Inadequacy: disconnected, pretended ignorance  To address the behavior, one must first recognize it… (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y8qb9TRqZsM)

5  Ways to identify Mistaken goals  Do you feel annoyed?  Do you feel threatened?  Do you feel hurt?  Do you feel powerless?  Or once the wrong behavior is addressed…  Does the student stop the behavior only to repeat it minutes later?  Do they refuse to stop or perhaps even increase the wrong behavior?  Does the student become outwardly violent ?  Do they simply refuse to respond, participate or acknowledge the teacher?


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