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Using the English Language Arts Foundation for Implementation Document (FFI) An FFI document is the teacher’s “toolbox” for planning for quality instruction.

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Presentation on theme: "Using the English Language Arts Foundation for Implementation Document (FFI) An FFI document is the teacher’s “toolbox” for planning for quality instruction."— Presentation transcript:

1 Using the English Language Arts Foundation for Implementation Document (FFI) An FFI document is the teacher’s “toolbox” for planning for quality instruction and assessment for/as/of learning. Planning for Quality Learning, Instruction, and Assessment

2 This tutorial is designed to help educators make meaning of the English Language Arts: Foundation for Implementation, 1998 document (FFI). Planning with an FFI document ensures that best practices are being implemented in Manitoba classrooms. Learning to use this document for planning is an effective and efficient means to quality learning, teaching, and assessing learning and teaching. About this Tutorial

3 Navigating around the tutorial: Part One - Knowing Where to Start Part Two - Targeting Learning Outcomes Part Three - Planning for Quality Learning, Instruction, and Assessment Part Four - Quality Assessment Part Five - An Example Theme/Unit: Goal Setting Select Your Learning Part You can click on each “Part” to enter that section … You can return to this slide at any time by clicking on the Home button. … or travel through the tutorial one slide at a time by clicking on the next button.

4 The tutorial consists of five parts: Part One - Knowing Where to Start Part Two - Targeting Outcomes Part Three - Using the Four Column Planner Part Four – Focusing on Quality Assessment for/as Learning Part Five - An Example Theme/Unit: Goal Setting Select Your Learning Part

5 Part One Knowing Where to Start

6 Use the Organizational Features of the Foundation For Implementation (FFI) to Navigate through the Document Classroom Library Quality literature. Text sets. Select criteria for observation. BLM 2 BLM 5 Choose strategies: Activate Acquire Apply Target 2-3 learning outcomes. Learning Teaching Resources. Suggestions for Assessment Suggestions for Instruction Specific Learning Outcomes 4 Columns Part One - Knowing Where to Start GLO Icons General Learning Outcome Maps

7 Part One - Knowing Where to Start The General Learning Outcomes (GLO) are represented by Icons which help you connect to the big idea that each represents. It is through a GLO, or a big idea, that you will find an “entry point” into the document. This literacy curriculum (FFI) is organized around five integrated General Learning Outcomes (GLOs)

8 Icons of the Five General Learning Outcomes (GLOs) GLO 5 GLO 1 GLO 2 GLO 3 GLO 4 Part One - Knowing Where to Start GLO 1 Explore Thoughts, Ideas, Feelings, and Experiences.

9 Icons of the Five General Learning Outcomes (GLOs) GLO 5 GLO 1 GLO 2 GLO 3 GLO 4 Part One - Knowing Where to Start GLO 2 Comprehend and Respond Personally and Critically to Oral, Literary, and Media Texts.

10 Icons of the Five General Outcomes (GOs) GLO 5 GLO 1 GLO 2 GLO 3 GLO 4 Part One - Knowing Where to Start GLO 3 Manage Ideas and Information.

11 Icons of the Five General Learning Outcomes (GLOs) GLO 5 GLO 1 GLO 2 GLO 3 GLO 4 Part One - Knowing Where to Start GLO 4 Enhance the Clarity and Artistry of Communication.

12 Icons of the Five General Learning Outcomes (GLOs) GLO 5 GLO 1 GLO 2 GLO 3 GLO 4 Part One - Knowing Where to Start GLO 5 Celebrate and Build Community.

13 You will use the GLO icons to find an entry point into the Foundation for Implementation (FFI) document. GLO 5 GLO 1 GLO 2 GLO 3 GLO 4 Part One - Knowing Where to Start

14 Set an instructional goal based on the strengths and needs of my learners. Determine the evidence of learning. Design a literacy rich learning environment. Target a General Outcome for your entry point into the FFI A Learner-Centered Approach to Planning Part One - Knowing Where to Start I need to STOP and REFLECT before I target specific learning outcomes. This reflecting is all done in pencil because formative assessment for learning informs instruction. Plans will change as you go.

15 setting an instructional goal based on the strengths and needs of my learners. possible evidence of learning. creating a literacy-rich learning environment. targeting a General Learning Outcome as the entry point into the FFI In a learner-centered approach to planning we need to reflect on: Part One - Knowing Where to Start

16 setting an instructional goal based on the strengths and needs of my learners. possible evidence of learning. creating a literacy rich learning environment. targeting a General Learning Outcome as the entry point into the FFI In a learner-centered approach to planning we need to reflect on: Part One - Knowing Where to Start What do I want my students to know and be able to do at the end of this learning experience?

17 setting an instructional goal based on the strengths and needs of my learners. possible evidence of learning. creating a literacy rich learning environment. targeting a General Learning Outcome as the entry point into the FFI In a learner-centered approach to planning we need to reflect on: Part One - Knowing Where to Start What will the evidence of student learning look and sound like?

18 setting an instructional goal based on the strengths and needs of my learners. possible evidence of learning. creating a literacy rich learning environment. targeting a General Learning Outcome as the entry point into the FFI In a learner-centered approach to planning we need to reflect on: Part One - Knowing Where to Start How will I design the classroom contexts and processes to facilitate learning?

19 setting an instructional goal based on the strengths and needs of my learners. possible evidence of learning. creating a literacy rich learning environment. targeting a General Learning Outcome as the entry point into the FFI In a learner-centered approach to planning we need to reflect on: Part One - Knowing Where to Start What General Learning Outcome will guide instruction, learning, and assessment through this learning experience?

20 Goal: Performance(s) Demonstration(s) Product(s): Classroom Processes: General Learning Outcomes: What do I want my students to know and be able to do in this learning experience? What will the evidence of student learning look and sound like? How will I design the classroom contexts and processes to facilitate learning? Planning for Quality … Part One - Knowing Where to Start What GLO will be my entry point into the ELA Foundation for Implementation? Quality refers to targeted learning outcomes for determining appropriate assessment criteria. When teachers in Manitoba use their FFI for planning for quality, all students are being assessed on the same criteria. Four Steps in Planning with the End in Mind (adapted from McTighe)

21 Goal: Performance(s) Demonstration(s) Product(s): Classroom Processes: General Learning Outcomes: What do I want my students to know and be able to do in this learning experience? What will the evidence of student learning look and sound like? How will I design the classroom contexts and processes to facilitate learning? Planning for Quality … Part One - Knowing Where to Start What GLO will be my entry point into the ELA Foundation for Implementation? Before planning units, themes or learning sequences, I need to reflect on the needs of the learners and the English language arts processes and content.

22 Goal: Performance(s) Demonstration(s) Product(s): Classroom Processes: General Learning Outcomes: What do I want my students to know and be able to do in this learning experience? What will the evidence of student learning look and sound like? How will I design the classroom contexts and processes to facilitate learning? Planning for Quality … Part One - Knowing Where to Start What GLO will be my entry point into the ELA Foundation for Implementation? This may be focused observations of processes/performances; demonstrations; student products; student and teacher reflections …

23 Goal: Performance(s) Demonstration(s) Product(s): Classroom Processes: General Learning Outcomes: What do I want my students to know and be able to do in this learning experience? What will the evidence of student learning look and sound like? How will I design the classroom contexts and processes to facilitate learning? Planning for Quality … Part One - Knowing Where to Start What GLO will be my entry point into the ELA Foundation for Implementation? This may be whole group or co- operative/flexible groups; workshop; reading process and writing process; goal-setting and reflection; explicit / implicit instruction; formative assessment for/as learning; inquiry…

24 Goal: Performance(s) Demonstration(s) Product(s): Classroom Processes: General Learning Outcomes: What do I want my students to know and be able to do in this learning experience? What will the evidence of student learning look and sound like? How will I design the classroom contexts and processes to facilitate learning? Planning for Quality … Part One - Knowing Where to Start What GLO will be my entry point into the ELA Foundation for Implementation? What General Learning Outcome will best fit the learning needs?

25 Goal: Performance(s) Demonstration(s) Product(s): Classroom Processes: General Learning Outcomes: What do I want my students to know and be able to do in this learning experience? What will the evidence of student learning look and sound like? How will I design the classroom contexts and processes to facilitate learning? Planning for Quality … Part One - Knowing Where to Start What GLO will be my entry point into the ELA Foundation for Implementation? This is my “entry point” into the FFI document.

26 Goal: Performance(s) Demonstration(s) Product(s): Classroom Processes: General Learning Outcome: What do I want my students to know and be able to do in this learning experience? What will the evidence of student learning look and sound like? How will I design the classroom contexts and processes to facilitate learning? Planning for Quality … Part One - Knowing Where to Start What GLO will be my entry point into the ELA Foundation for Implementation? Then, the FFI document will show me where to go and what to do next.

27 Goal: Performance(s) Demonstration(s) Product(s): Classroom Processes: General Learning Outcome: What do I want my students to know and be able to do in this learning experience? What will the evidence of student learning look and sound like? How will I design the classroom contexts and processes to facilitate learning? Planning for Quality … Part One - Knowing Where to Start What GLO will be my entry point into the ELA Foundation for Implementation? Four Steps in Planning with the End in Mind (adapted from McTighe)

28 Set an instructional goal based on the strengths and needs of my learners. Determine the evidence of learning. Design a literacy rich learning environment. Target a General Lerning Outcome for your entry point into the FFI A Learner-Centered Approach to Planning Part One - Knowing Where to Start Now I am ready to start targeting specific learning outcomes.

29 Scenario 1- Teacher’s Goal: I want my students to be able to access and organize information from a variety of sources for their science inquiry. [GLO3]GLO3] Scenario 2- Teacher’s Goal: I want my students to be able to set and reflect upon attainable learning goals. [GLO1][GLO1] Scenario 3- Teacher’s Goal: I want my students to be able to write a reflection in their co-operative groups. [GLO5][GLO5] Scenario 4- Teacher’s Goal: I want my students to be able to choose from a broad variety of quality literature for enjoyment and learning. [GLO2]GLO2] Scenario 5- Teacher’s Goal: I want my students to explore a variety of forms and techniques in quality literature to be able to communicate ideas and information to a real audience. [GLO4 and/or GLO2][GLO4 GLO2] Part One - Knowing Where to Start Pause, Practice and Reflect… Pause and take some time to become acquainted with your FFI document. You may want to practice your developing understanding by working through the following scenarios: What’s the GLO? Reflect… What do you notice about the teacher’s goals? What connections can you make to your practice? How might setting goals for instruction help you use your FFI more effectively and efficiently?

30 Part Two Targeting Learning Outcomes

31 Foundation For Implementation K-4 and 5-8: Overview p. 5-6 “In a balanced language arts program, the language arts and the learning outcomes are integrated into logical and developmentally appropriate learning sequences.” “…single learning outcomes are rarely taught in isolation. Effective integrated language arts classroom learning experiences typically address many learning outcomes simultaneously.” “The specific learning outcomes listed in the four columns are not intended to be taught in the order in which they are written.” “Language arts instruction and assessment should always occur within meaningful literacy contexts.” Part Two – Targeting Outcomes

32 Goal: Performance(s) Demonstration(s) Product(s): Classroom Processes: General Learning Outcomes: What do I want my students to know and be able to do in this learning experience? What will the evidence of student learning look and sound like? How will I design the classroom contexts and processes to facilitate learning? Planning for Quality … Part Two – Targeting Outcomes What GO will be my entry point into the ELA Foundation for Implementation? What General Learning Outcome will best fit the learning needs of my students?

33 Part Two – Targeting Outcomes A General Learning Outcome Map is my “entry point” to the FFI document. I want my students to organize information from a variety of sources.

34 Part Two – Targeting Outcomes What GLO will be my entry point into the Foundation for Implementation (FFI) document?

35 Part Two – Targeting Outcomes General Learning Outcome 3 includes the specific learning outcomes I need to consider.

36 Part Two – Targeting Outcomes I want my students to identify a variety of sources and to organize new information

37 I have targeted specific learning outcomes Identify Sources, and Organize Information. Part Two – Targeting Outcomes

38 Now, I can choose from a variety of appropriate instructional strategies in column 2 … Part Two – Targeting Outcomes

39 and assessment criteria in column 3 - for learning and instruction. Part Two – Targeting Outcomes

40 Identify the GLO that will be your “entry point” into your FFI document. Locate the GLO outcome map in your FFI document and target 1 or 2 specific learning outcomes (SLO’s) that will meet the learning needs of your students. The SLO’s will guide your planning for quality learning, teaching, and assessment.outcome map Return to the scenarios in Part One “Knowing Where to Start: Pause, Practice and Reflect” for further practice targeting outcomes.“Knowing Where to Start: Pause, Practice and Reflect” Reflect … What do you notice about your goals and learners’ needs? How might targeting outcomes help you use your FFI more effectively and efficiently? How might targeting outcomes improve learning and teaching in your classroom? Part Two – Targeting Learning Outcomes Pause, Practice and Reflect… Pause and take a few moments to reflect and practice targeting outcomes to meet the needs of your students, and to uncover curriculum. Based on your reflections:

41 Part Three Using the Four Column Planner

42 Another organizational feature of your FFI document is the Four Columns Prescribed Learning Outcomes Suggestions for Instruction Suggestions for Assessment Suggested Learning Resources COLUMN 1COLUMN 2COLUMN 3COLUMN 4 Part Three – Using the Four Column Planner

43 The Four Column Planner The Four-Column Planner is a template for recording plans. This planner is the same format as the four columns in your FFI document. Part Three – Using the Four Column Planner Note your reflections and “Think Abouts…” at the top of the planning template. Always plan in pencil because formative assessment for learning informs instruction. Plans will change as you go. Download the Four Column Planner

44 How will my students show what they know and can do? How will I design the literacy learning teaching context? Part Three – Using the Four Column Planner What do I want my students to know and do?

45 How will my students show what they know and can do? How will I design the literacy learning teaching context? What do I want my students to know and do? Part Three – Using the Four Column Planner Go to the GLO outcome map to target 1-2 specific learning outcomes - Column 1 outcome map

46 How will my students show what they know and can do? How will I design the literacy learning teaching context? What do I want my students to know and do? Part Three – Using the Four Column Planner Choose strategies for activating, acquiring, applying - Column 2.

47 How will my students show what they know and can do? How will I design the literacy learning teaching context? What do I want my students to know and do? Part Three – Using the Four Column Planner Record 1-2 criteria from the top section of Column 3 in FFI, Focus for Assessment - Column 3.

48 How will my students show what they know and can do? How will I design the literacy learning teaching context? What do I want my students to know and do? Part Three – Using the Four Column Planner Build text sets, plan field trips… note this in Column 4.

49 Part Three – Using the Four Column Planner Pause, Practice and Reflect… Pause and take a few moments to practice using Scenario 4 in Part One. The teacher’s goal is that her students will choose from a broad variety of quality literature for enjoyment and learning. [GO2]. You may want to download the Four Column Planner to practice the following task: (Word) (PDF)Scenario 4 in Part One(Word)(PDF) Locate the GLO 2 map in your FFI. Target 1-2 specific learning outcomes.GLO 2 map Turn to the first page of the targeted SLO(s) in your FFI. (The SLOs are in column 1.) In column 2, browse the wide variety of suggestions for instruction and consider strategies for a learning teaching sequence (activating, acquiring, applying) to meet your learners’ needs. Choose the strategies for learning and teaching and note them on your Four Column Planner. (Note a strategy like KWL may be appropriate for activating, acquiring, and applying learning.) Continue practicing with the other scenarios, or, apply your understanding to your own reflections, goal (s), and learners’ needs.

50 Part Four Focusing on Quality Assessment for/as/of Learning

51 Prescribed Learning Outcomes Suggestions for Instruction Suggestions for Assessment Suggested Learning Resources COLUMN 1COLUMN 2COLUMN 3COLUMN 4 Quality assessment is based on the targeted learning outcomes (column 1) and their criteria (column 3). Part Four – Focusing on Quality Assessment For/ As/ Of Learning

52 How will my students show what they know and can do? How will I design the literacy learning teaching context? What do I want my students to know and do? Part Four – Focusing on Quality Assessment For/ As/ Of Learning Generally during the activating and acquiring phases of instruction, teachers reflect on their plans, focus and re-focus their observations, and adjust instruction to meet the needs of all learners.

53 How will my students show what they know and can do? How will I design the literacy learning teaching context? What do I want my students to know and do? Part Four – Focusing on Quality Assessment For/ As/ Of Learning This is Formative Assessment. Formative Assessment

54 How will my students show what they know and can do? How will I design the literacy learning teaching context? What do I want my students to know and do? Part Four – Focusing on Quality Assessment For/ As/ Of Learning Formative Assessment Summative Assessment Summative Assessment occurs when students are able to apply new understandings in a variety of authentic contexts and over time, often at the end of a unit, theme, term...

55 How will my students show what they know and can do? How will I design the literacy learning teaching context? What do I want my students to know and do? The 4 Column Planner and Focused Observations To monitor what you “see” and “hear” in relation to the targeted learning outcomes in Column 1 and criteria in Column 3, you will observe 2-3 students in a variety of authentic literacy- rich contexts (Column 2) over time. Part Four – Focusing on Quality Assessment For/ As/ Of Learning

56 How will my students show what they know and can do? How will I design the literacy learning teaching context? What do I want my students to know and do? The 4 Column Planner and Focused Observations To monitor what you “see” and “hear” in relation to the targeted learning outcomes in Column 1 and criteria in Column 3, you will observe 2-3 students in a variety of authentic literacy- rich contexts (Column 2) over time. Part Four – Focusing on Quality Assessment For/ As/ Of Learning To do this you can use a form for recording focused observations.

57 Recording Focused Observations: Formative Assessment for Learning After jotting down the targeted specific learning outcomes (Column 1 in FFI) and the criteria for observation (Column 3 in FFI) on the Four-Column Planner, transfer this information to a recording form such as this Focused Observation Form BLM 5. Part Four – Focusing on Quality Assessment For/ As/ Of Learning

58 Recording Focused Observations: Formative Assessment for Learning Part Four – Focusing on Quality Assessment For/ As/ Of Learning Now, select 2-3 students to observe over time in a variety of literacy-rich contexts for instruction/formative assessment.

59 Recording Focused Observations: Formative Assessment for Learning BLM 5 – Focused Observations This is an example from Independent Together: Supporting the Multilevel Learning Community, Part Four – Focusing on Quality Assessment For/ As/ Of Learning

60 Recording Focused Observations: Formative Assessment for Learning Part Four – Focusing on Quality Assessment For/ As/ Of Learning Visit the Independent Together Multilevel Online Learning Community to view many online resources. /multilevel/community.html /multilevel/community.html

61 Open your FFI at any page immediately following a GLO map. (Note the criteria for assessment in column 3.These criteria are not a check list but rather a guide for your observations in a variety of authentic learning teaching contexts as suggested in column 2, and, over time.) Examine each criterion and select 1 or 2 which reflect the needs of your learners at this point in time. (Criteria which you identity in October may be different from that in March.) Continue working through your FFI document in this manner to gain confidence in using it for quality assessment for/as/of learning. Examine BLM 5. This is one way to monitor the targeted specific learning outcomes and the criteria for assessment as you observe your learners throughout daily instruction (activating, acquiring, applying).Examine BLM 5 Part Four – Focusing on Quality Assessment For/ As/ Of Learning Pause, Practice and Reflect…

62 Part Five An Example Theme/Unit: Goal Setting

63 The following example theme is built around a reflection and goal-setting learning experience in a multilevel classroom, K-8. It is adaptable to any K- 8, multilevel or single-grade, classroom. Part Five – An Example Theme/Unit: Goal Setting

64 Part Five – An Example Theme:/Unit Goal Setting

65 The teacher’s before planning Think About is at the top of the Four Column Planner.

66 Part Five – An Example Theme:/Unit Goal Setting GLO 1 and GLO2 are the entry points to the FFI document and the targeted outcomes from the outcome map are penciled into Column 1.

67 Part Five – An Example Theme:/Unit Goal Setting The learning and teaching strategies from Column 2 in the FFI document are chosen to meet the needs of the learners. (Choose 1-2 strategies when you are just starting out. Your repertoire will grow with practice.)

68 Part Five – An Example Theme:/Unit Goal Setting The formative and summative assessment criteria from Column 3 in the FFI document are also noted in column 3 on this planner.

69 Part Five – An Example Theme:/Unit Goal Setting The student learning resources for the learning and teaching experience are listed in column 4.

70 Part Five – An Example Theme:/Unit Goal Setting Also, connect to BLM 5 – Focused Observations. Independent Together: Supporting the Multilevel Learning Community, 2003.BLM 5 – Focused Observations.

71 To learn more about planning for inquiry visit the Multilevel Learning Community at cur/multilevel/community.html cur/multilevel/community.html Part Five – An Example Theme:/Unit Goal Setting

72 Consider using BLM 9 (The Four Column Planner) and Appendix B: Planning Model (for Inquiry) Appendix B: Planning Model (for Inquiry) at

73 Part Five – An Example Theme:/Unit Goal Setting BLM 9 (The Four Column Planner) can be downloaded at ur/multilevel/blm/blm_9.doc ur/multilevel/blm/blm_9.doc

74 Part Five – An Example Theme:/Unit Goal Setting Learning through Integrated Inquiry can be accessed at ur/multilevel/integrated_inquiry. html ur/multilevel/integrated_inquiry. html Appendix B: Planning Model (for Inquiry) can be downloaded at

75 Part Five – An Example Theme:/Unit Goal Setting This Four-Column Planner has been adapted to show curricular integration (Column 1)

76 What do I want my students to know and do? Part Five – An Example Theme:/Unit Goal Setting Column 3 allows for planning of guided inquiry which reflects the Gradual Release of Responsibility from teacher-led to student- led inquiry.

77 Reflect on… Your students’ learning needs and your instructional goal(s). Using the icons to enter your FFI “toolbox”. Scanning the GLO outcome maps to target 1-2 SLO’s. Reading the four columns to determine activating, acquiring, and applying strategies (column 2) for learning, teaching, and assessment. Noting the Focus for Assessment in column 3 to ensure appropriate criteria is being referenced. Choosing a planning template and assessment recording form to work for you. Responsive practice starts and culminates with reflection- it is on-going and cyclic. Part Five – An Example Theme/Unit: Goal Setting

78 Reflect on… The English language arts curriculum in your classroom Hear Notice / See Think / Feel / Wonder? My Next Step(s)… Use BLM 1. ca/k12/cur/multilevel/bl m/index.html Part Five – An Example Theme:/Unit Goal Setting

79 Bibliography Independent Together: Supporting the Multi Level Learning Community. Manitoba Education and Youth, 2003 http ://www.edu.gov.mb.ca/k12/cur/multilevel/index.html Kindergarten to Grade 4 and Grade 5 – 8 English Language Arts: A Foundation for Implementation. Winnipeg, MB: Manitoba Education and Training, entation McTighe, Jay and Wiggins, Grant. Understanding by Design. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development ://www.edu.gov.mb.ca/k12/cur/multilevel/index.html entationhttp://www.jaymctighe.com/articles.html Planning for Quality Learning, Instruction, and Assessment


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