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Assessment Matters : Enhancing Student Learning Linda A. Roberts, LMS Northeast High School – Arma, KS KASL Past-President Terri Snethen, LMS Blue Valley.

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Presentation on theme: "Assessment Matters : Enhancing Student Learning Linda A. Roberts, LMS Northeast High School – Arma, KS KASL Past-President Terri Snethen, LMS Blue Valley."— Presentation transcript:

1 Assessment Matters : Enhancing Student Learning Linda A. Roberts, LMS Northeast High School – Arma, KS KASL Past-President Terri Snethen, LMS Blue Valley North High School – Overland Park, KS Recipient of KASL Fall Forum Grant with a Special Report from Dr. Jackie Lakin Information Management Consultant - KSDE Reports from “Assessing Student Learning in the School Library Media Center” AASL Fall Forum, October 2006 April 10, 2007

2 2 Acknowledgements Kansas Association of School Librarians (KASL) AASL Fall Forum Grant – 2008 – Application due February 1, 2008 Mentorship Program

3 3 AASL Fall Forums “AASL Fall Forum Focuses on Reading to Learn” (2004) “Assessing Student Learning in the School Library Media Center” (2006) TBA (2008)

4 4 Presentation Outline What is assessment? Why should SLMSs be involved in assessment? How should SLMSs become involved? How can we best assess student learning? Which assessment tool is the right one to use? How should instruction include assessments? How may we communicate evidence of learning? What questions do you have? What resources are available? Happy TRAILS to you!

5 5 What is assessment? Process of collecting, analyzing, and reporting data Assessment offers more than evaluation Evaluation – summative activity that places value on the end result (auditing) Assessment – formative activity that reveals student performance throughout the learning process (educating and improving) Assessment provides decisive information on how a student is doing and what can be used to improve the learning experience

6 6 Purpose of Assessments Interactive characteristic makes it a part of a larger paradigm shift – spiraling & student- focused – results in improved student learning Engages students in learning through ownership and understanding expectations Learning tool that serves both teacher and students Teachers and SLMSs can redirect activities based on assessments Becomes a motivational tool for students by giving them direct input into how they will be assessed

7 7 Formative vs. Summative – You Decide Summative Learning Formative (Harada and Yoshina 2)

8 8 Why should SLMSs be involved in assessment? We have a curriculum and a vision for instructional information literacy We have a real need for “ongoing assessment of student progress... and the reporting of this progress in a manner that communicates effectively to school staff, students, and parents” We are trained collaborators Who needs convincing??? (The Handy 5, 7)

9 9 What are my excuses not to become involved? Myth 1 – The fault lies with the students being unable to learn. Myth 2 – Repetition using the same approach is best, so there is no need to assess and change things. Myth 3 – The primary method of assessing student performance is traditional evaluation tools, such as paper and pencil tests. Myth 4 – Assessment and evaluation are the same thing, therefore, SLMSs won’t assess because they don’t give grades. Myth 5 – Skills and attitudes that students develop their ability to read and use information do not require assessment. Myth 6 – Developing skills and attitudes for lifelong learning are not the focus of instruction in the library. These are attributes that learners somehow acquire on their own later in life. (Harada and Yoshina xvi-xvii)

10 10 Good News! While NCLB has caused a dread of “assessments”, it offers opportunities Let it become an empowering force that gives authority to SLMSs Use this impetus to take immediate action and make a difference – become the leader!

11 11 How should SLMSs become involved? Be proactive Start small – small changes make big gains Ask for course syllabi Help decide what students must be able to do at the end of the learning experience Be able to identify standards and indicators addressed Provide evidence of learning that results from instruction

12 12 How should SLMSs become involved? Help design assessment tools with students and teachers Participate in formative assessments Review search strategies with students and suggest additional resources as needed Help teachers identify issues to investigate Teach use of multimedia tools for interviews and presentations Seize opportunities to show how our teaching reinforces and enhances classroom learning

13 13 What is your vision? Claim authority Claim your authority in your classroom : The LMC We are the learning specialists in the area of information literacy and technology Students AND teachers should become our “students” - mentor! True authority does not come from administrators, it comes from the large gap between the academic expectations for learners and current achievement levels Get the data - study and learn from actions and their results – otherwise it is appears we are coming from a biased viewpoint (Zmuda)

14 14 What is your vision? Write it down! Without a curriculum document, the LMC does not exist. Include these ideas: Identify and clarify core beliefs with a shared and measurable vision Articulate what we want to look like and be like in the future Define our principles, values, and beliefs about teaching and learning Define measurable and attainable goals of what we want to accomplish in student and adult learning

15 15 Can we talk about it? – SLMS Job Description Challenge: Write a vision to include indicators for: Classroom teachers and students Collection development plan Physical environment Relationship to school improvement efforts Write your job description from your vision Write one or two measurable statements of what you would see if you were fulfilling the vision of what a SLMS should do Check the time on each job and analyze if your time identifies and fits your vision

16 16 How can we best assess student learning? Begin with clear learning targets and criteria for assessment Consider how many assignments are worth the time and effort they are given Look at information literacy standards that overlap content standards Be prepared to think and do things differently

17 17 Assessments StudentsTeachers School Community NCLBSLMPSLMSTime Essential Relationships

18 18 Which assessment tool is the right one to use? Effective Assessment Tools: Have established criteria (what are you looking for?) Can be used by students to gauge progress (how are they doing?) Can be used by teachers and librarians to inform instruction (how are you doing?) Are used throughout the instructional process – beginning, middle, end (Harada and Yoshina 19)

19 19 Tools For Assessing Learning Checklists Rubrics Rating Scales Conferences Logs Personal correspondence Graphic Organizers

20 20 Checklists Often involve yes/no rating Don’t assess quality Can be used to assess behaviors Keep student/teacher/librarian focused on important aspect(s) of task Keep a record of progress Can be used for simple tasks (Harada and Yoshina19-21)

21 21 Example Checklist Evaluation Judge Your Product (How effective were you?) - Do this step before your assignment is due. 1. Are all components of the assignment present? YesNo 2. Are all assignment guidelines met? YesNo 3. Are all sources correctly cited? YesNo 4. Is this a product you can be proud of? YesNo

22 22 Example Checklist

23 23 Rubrics Grid design Describes levels of success or mastery – strong, adequate, weak etc. Can be used for complex tasks Can vary in level of detail Can be used for evaluation and/or instruction Can be created with student input – What does a quality product look like? (Harada and Yoshina 21-23)

24 24 Example Rubric Kansas State Writing Assessment GRADE 5: NARRATIVE WRITING RUBRIC: SENTENCE FLUENCY Rating of 5 (Strong): The writing has an easy flow and rhythm when read aloud. Sentences are well built, with consistently strong and varied structure that makes expressive oral reading easy and enjoyable. Rating of 3 (Developing): The text hums along efficiently for the most part, though it may lack a certain rhythm or grace. It tends to be more pleasant or businesslike than musical, more mechanical than fluid. Rating of 1 (Beginning): The paper is difficult to follow or read aloud. Most sentences tend to be choppy, incomplete, rambling, or awkward; they need work. More than one of the following problems is likely to be evident:

25 25 Example Rubric Oral History Project – Library Media Evaluation Rubric Works Cited Page (content, format and punctuation) Attempts were made to create a works cited page, which contained multiple errors with regards to punctuation, citing sources, as well as how the order of information was presented. Works cited page had more than a few punctuation errors; a few sources were improperly cited and the order of information contained some errors. Works cited page was completed with very minor punctuation errors (no more than a few) and sources were cited properly with correct order of information. Internal Documentation (content) In-text citations were improperly formatted, or in some cases omitted. In-text citations had minor errors in format and/or placement. In-text citations were used correctly and formatted appropriately. Consistency (whether internal documentation and works cited page match up) In-text citations did not match works cited entries in most cases. Some in-text citations pointed directly to a works cited entry. Others did not. All in-text citations pointed directly to a works cited entry. MLA Format (correct titling, font, spacing, margins, running headers, etc.) MLA format had major mistakes with regard to headers and font. Spacing, margins, and titles had major errors. MLA format had minor problems with regard to headers and font. Spacing, margins, and titles had occasional mistakes. MLA format was closely followed with regard to headers and font. Spacing, margins, and titles were also correctly formatted. Total Points = ________

26 26 Rating Scales Identifies criteria for performance Does NOT describe levels of performance Used for measuring multiple aspects of a task Can be qualitative (use adjectives) or quantitative (use numbers) Often use questions (Harada and Yoshina 27-29)

27 27 Example Rating Scale Library Media Survey 1. I was confident using databases to find information before this project began. Strongly AgreeAgreeNo OpinionDisagreeStrongly Disagree 2. I am very confident using databases to find information now. Strongly AgreeAgreeNo OpinionDisagreeStrongly Disagree 3. I now understand how to use MLA format to cite my sources. Strongly AgreeAgreeNo OpinionDisagreeStrongly Disagree 4. I think my project was a success. Strongly AgreeAgreeNo OpinionDisagreeStrongly Disagree 5.In a minimum of one sentence, write what the library staff could have done differently to assist you with this project? 6. In a minimum of one sentence, write one thing that you learned about researching from this project?

28 28 Conferences Are conversations Can be casual or formal Are very flexible Can be very time consuming May be tailored to needs of student (Harada and Yoshina 31-34)

29 29 Logs Involve self-assessment and reflection Help students monitor their own learning Require well designed prompts matched to learning goals Can be used to assess feelings and attitudes Are best used in conjunction with other assessment tools (Harada and Yoshina 44 )

30 30 Example Log Prompts Goal: Accesses Information efficiently and effectively How did you go about finding the information to answer your research questions? Describe your search strategy. Goal: Evaluates information critically and competently Which sources did you find most helpful? What criteria did you use in selecting your sources Goal: Pursues information related to personal interests How does this topic relate to your life? What aspects of the topic are most interesting to you? (Harada and Yoshina 36)

31 31 Example Log Prompts Goal: Appreciates literature and other creative expressions of information What is the best book you read this month (quarter, semester, year)? How did the book relate to your own life? How does it compare with other books you have read? (Harada and Yoshina 36)

32 32 Example Log Prompts My Research Log Today I worked on ___________________________. I learned that _______________________________. Some problems I had were ____________________. Tomorrow I will _____________________________. This is how I feel about myself as a researcher: HappySadConfused (Harada and Yoshina 38)

33 33 Personal Correspondence Can include letters, notes, invitations, feedback Can involve others in the learning process (parents, community members, peers, etc.) (Harada and Yoshina 44-45)

34 34 Example Personal Correspondence Library Media Survey 1. I was confident using databases to find information before this project began. Strongly AgreeAgreeNo OpinionDisagreeStrongly Disagree 2. I am very confident using databases to find information now. Strongly AgreeAgreeNo OpinionDisagreeStrongly Disagree 3. I now understand how to use MLA format to cite my sources. Strongly AgreeAgreeNo OpinionDisagreeStrongly Disagree 4. I think my project was a success. Strongly AgreeAgreeNo OpinionDisagreeStrongly Disagree 5.In a minimum of one sentence, write what the library staff could have done differently to assist you with this project? 6. In a minimum of one sentence, write one thing that you learned about researching from this project?

35 35 Personal Correspondence Ideas Have students write notes to others with feedback on presentations Have students write notes to parents for parent- teacher conferences Have students invite parents to presentations they have researched (Harada and Yoshina 44-45)

36 36 Graphic Organizers Visual representations of thinking Can help learners: make connections see patterns and relationships outline ideas compare and contrast show cause and effect determine key ideas organize research take notes (Harada and Yoshina 49-50)

37 37 Types of Graphic Organizers KWL Concept map Venn Diagram Web Comparison matrix Flow chart Tree map Storyboard

38 38 Example Graphic Organizer

39 39 Example Graphic Organizer BooksDatabases Where will I find information? Internet

40 40 How should instruction include assessments? Backward Design 2 Questions What must students be able to demonstrate or perform by the end of this experience? How can we measure how well students have achieved this goal? (Harada and Yoshina 15)

41 41 Traditional Planning Start with ideas Select activities Develop lesson procedure Determine objectives based on activities Decide assessment method (Harada and Yoshina 68)

42 42 Backward Design Outcomes Standards and Indicators Task Assessment Criteria Tool(s) Instructional Procedure What will teacher do? What will LMS do? What will students? (Harada and Yoshina)

43 43 Backward Design Example Scenario : A 9th grade English teacher wants students to research an aspect of what life was like in the 1930s before reading Of Mice and Men. Possible topics include politics and government, everyday life, art and culture, economics and business. She wants them to create an an annotated bibliography of 3 sources (one print, one website, one from a database) and develop a “Top Ten List” that summarizes the most important information about the topic.

44 44 Backward Design Example StandardIndicatorTaskAssessment Criteria

45 45 Backward Design Example Assessment Tool(s) What will teacher do? What will LMS do? What will students do?

46 46 How may we communicate evidence of learning? Establish the need We must demonstrate how our teaching contributes to learning We must generate reports We must understand the data We must communicate results to school staff, students, and parents Look to new research

47 47 Current research in Kansas

48 48 Are these questions being addressed? What would our curriculum look like if students designed it? What is the selling point for teachers and administrators to address information literacy? How do you get students to care about a higher level of self-scrutiny in their work? How do you move teachers from assigning reports to research? How much priority is given to the analysis of student work by both the SLMS and school? How are we closing the achievement gap?

49 49 What questions do you have?

50 50 What resources are available? - “Refereed Research Articles”www.ala.org/aasl/slmr “Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) at Your Library Media Center: The Collaboration of Administration and Library Media Centers” by Cynthia Anderson (Library Media Connection) - Information Power Action Research Project (short student assessment)http://www.yourschoollibrary.com/welcome.html Assessing Learning : Librarians The Handy 5 – KASL Research and Teachers as Partners Committee, (Harada & Yoshina)

51 51 What resources are available? Program Administration Principles of School Library Media Programs Excerpted from Chapter 6, "Program Administration," of Information Power: Building Partnerships for Learning. Copyright © tionpower/ipprogramadmin.htmhttp://www.ala.org/ala/aasl/aaslproftools/informa tionpower/ipprogramadmin.htm

52 52 Happy TRAILS to you! Tool for Real-time Assessment of Information Literacy Skills Multiple-choice online assessments Based on the 9th grade Ohio Academic Content Standards and Information PowerOhio Academic Content StandardsInformation Power Results available by Online Review and class/ students reports

53 53 TRAILS

54 54


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