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Assessment. Agenda Good News Evaluation Formative Summative –Formative vs. Summative Evaluation –http://jan.ucc.nau.edu/edtech/etc667/proposal /evaluation/summative_vs._formative.htmhttp://jan.ucc.nau.edu/edtech/etc667/proposal.

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Presentation on theme: "Assessment. Agenda Good News Evaluation Formative Summative –Formative vs. Summative Evaluation –http://jan.ucc.nau.edu/edtech/etc667/proposal /evaluation/summative_vs._formative.htmhttp://jan.ucc.nau.edu/edtech/etc667/proposal."— Presentation transcript:

1 Assessment

2 Agenda Good News

3 Evaluation Formative Summative –Formative vs. Summative Evaluation –http://jan.ucc.nau.edu/edtech/etc667/proposal /evaluation/summative_vs._formative.htmhttp://jan.ucc.nau.edu/edtech/etc667/proposal /evaluation/summative_vs._formative.htm

4 What is classroom assessment? Classroom assessment is both a teaching approach and a set of techniques. –The approach assumes that the more you know about what and how students are learning, the better you can plan learning activities to structure your teaching. –The techniques are mostly simple, non- graded, anonymous, in-class activities. Campus Instructional Computing

5 Testing Standardized tests Teacher Developed (criterion referenced) tests –http://mng- unix1.marasconewton.com/peacecorps/Document s/M0044/m0044e/m0044e17.htm#standardized%2 0test%20vs.%20teacher%20made%20testshttp://mng- unix1.marasconewton.com/peacecorps/Document s/M0044/m0044e/m0044e17.htm#standardized%2 0test%20vs.%20teacher%20made%20tests

6 Matching Purpose and Type in Assessment PurposeFormal AssessmentInformal Assessment To ascertain a child's preparedness to benefit from a particular planned program Readiness tests (criterion referenced)Observation; parents' reports To identify children who may need specialized placement (e.g., special education) or a modified, individualized classroom program Developmental screening tests (to be followed by developmental evaluation for those identified) Error analysis; structured observation To evaluate the appropriateness of teaching programs and teaching strategies Appropriate criterion-referenced achievement tests Teacher-made tests and procedures; observation; analysis of work samples To evaluate a child's progress Appropriate criterion-referenced achievement tests Teacher-made tests and procedures; observation; analysis of work samples For determining classification and placement Developmental assessment tests (normative standardization) with high reliability and predictive validity. Teacher-made tests and procedures; observation; analysis of work samples Strategies for Collecting, Recording, and Interpreting Assessment Information

7 Teacher-made tests Teacher-made tests can be important parts of the teaching and learning process if they are integrated into daily classroom teaching, and are constructed to be part of the learning process - not just the culminating event. Burke. K., The Mindful School: How to Assess Authentic Learning, Revised edition (1997), p. 19

8 Authentic tests will capture diversity by allowing students a wide variety of ways of demonstrating what they know and what they can do. Therefore: students need to understand the purpose and value of the test. the test must assess intended outcomes. clear directions must be given for each section of the test. the questions should vary from simple to complex. point values should be awarded for each section (e.g. true/false [2 points each]). the question types (true/false, fill-in-the-blank, multiple choice, essay, matching) should be varied. tests must be easy to read (and leave space between questions to facilitate reading and writing). tests should reflect an appropriate reading level. tests should include a variety of visual, aural and kinesthetic tasks. tests must make allowances for students with special needs. tests must give students some choice in the questions they select (e.g. a choice of graphic organizers or essay questions). tests should vary the levels of questions to include gathering, processing and applying information. tests must provide sufficient time for all students to finish. Focusing on Outcomes,

9 Guidelines for teacher-made tests 1.Create the test before beginning the unit. 2.Make sure the test is correlated to course objectives or learning standards and benchmarks. 3.Give clear directions for each section of the test. 4.Arrange the questions from simple to complex. 5.Give point values for each section (e.g., true/false count for two points each). 6.Vary the question types (true/false, fill-in-the-blank, multiple choice, essay, matching). Limit to 10 questions per type. 7.Group question types together. 8.Type or print clearly. (Leave space between questions to facilitate easy reading and writing.) 9.Make sure appropriate reading level is used. 10.Include a variety of visual, oral and kinesthetic tasks. 11.Make allowances for students with special needs. 12.Give students some choice in the questions they select (e.g., a choice of graphic organizers or essay questions). 13.Vary levels of questions (gathering, processing and application questions). 14.Provide a grading scale so students know what score constitutes a certain grade. 15.Give sufficient time for all students to finish. Adapted from How to Assess Authentic Learning, 3rd Edition, by Kay Burke. ©1999 SkyLight Training and Publishing Inc. Reprinted by permission of Pearson SkyLight, or (800)

10 USE SHORT-ANSWER TESTS WHEN YOU : have a large number of students want a reliable test that is quick and easy to grade feel more comfortable about your ability to create short answer test questions that reflect your objectives than about grading an essay test objectively and determining whether your objectives have been met have more time to develop the test than grade it want to measure broad content are working with lower level primary students want to test for simple facts and vocabulary words Standardized test vs. teacher-made tests unix1.marasconewton.com/peacecorps/Documents/M0044/m0044e/m0044e17.htm

11 USE ESSAY TESTS WHEN YOU: want to test for critical and creative thinking skills such as problem solving, analyzing, and evaluating want to evaluate written communication skills have more time to grade a test rather than develop it want to make sure students can't "guess“ want to know how much in-depth understanding students have want to evaluate how well students can organize their thoughts don't have access to copying facilities and need to write questions on the chalkboard or on a flip chart Standardized test vs. teacher-made tests unix1.marasconewton.com/peacecorps/Documents/M0044/m0044e/m0044e17.htm

12 SHORT ANSWER TIPS AND TRICKS: Make sure test questions measure the objectives you feel are most important. Don't include trick questions or "trivial pursuit" questions. Check for and eliminate stereotypes and bias. Try to make each question independent. Students shouldn't be able to answer one question by reading another Make sure questions are easy to understand and well-written. Match the number of questions to the time/emphasis you put on objectives in class. If you spent 10% of the class focusing on objectives related to acid rain and detecting bias, then about 10% of the test should reflect that. Match the length of the test and the time given to take the test to the abilities of your students. (Some students need more time and fewer questions.) Don't include choices that are obviously wrong. (However, you might consider including occasional choices that are ridiculous or funny if you want to lighten the mood of the class a bit.) Standardized test vs. teacher-made tests unix1.marasconewton.com/peacecorps/Documents/M0044/m0044e/m0044e17.htm

13 ESSAY TIPS AND TRICKS: Make sure the directions are clear so that students can focus their writing. Match the questions to the objectives you feel are most important. Set up an objective scoring system and explain it to your students. Also let them know how much each question is worth. Give students enough time. Give students a choice of questions. (Choose any 3 out of 6.) Make the most of the questions. Encourage students to think, evaluate, organize, and analyze. Don't give one-question essay tests. Balance essay questions that require long answers with those that require shorter answers. (This will help increase the amount of material you can cover.) Grade each essay question on each paper before moving onto the next. (Grade all the answers to question 1, then all the answers to question 2, and so on.) This will help you grade the answers more objectively. Standardized test vs. teacher-made tests unix1.marasconewton.com/peacecorps/Documents/M0044/m0044e/m0044e17.htm


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