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Guiding, Supporting, Assessing Student Teacher Growth: A Seminar for Cooperating Teachers and University Supervisors Module II is an overview of Co-teaching.

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Presentation on theme: "Guiding, Supporting, Assessing Student Teacher Growth: A Seminar for Cooperating Teachers and University Supervisors Module II is an overview of Co-teaching."— Presentation transcript:

1 Guiding, Supporting, Assessing Student Teacher Growth: A Seminar for Cooperating Teachers and University Supervisors Module II is an overview of Co-teaching in Kentucky. It is divided into three sections: Roles and responsibilities of the professional partners, the seven strategies of co-teaching, and co-planning, co-teaching, co-reflection. This module (Module II) is one of three presented to address the Education Professional Standards Board (EPSB) regulation governing admission, placement and supervision in student teaching: 16 KAR 5:040. Specifically, Module II addresses “Best Practice in supporting the student teacher” (16 KAR 5:040, Section 2 (5 b). Module II emphasizes using the co-teaching module created by St. Cloud University in Minnesota as a basis of supervision. Module I, presented by the EPSB, aims to address “Basic responsibilities of a cooperating teacher”. (16 KAR 5:040, Section 2 - 5a). Module III which addresses “ Effective assessment of the student teacher” (16 KAR 5:040, Section 2 -5c) will completed as part of individual university program presentations. is an overview of Co-teaching in Kentucky.

2 Seminar Facilitators Assisted by: Julie Cleary and Mary Henderson
University of Kentucky Sharon Brennan University of Kentucky By’Shey McDonald Liberty Elementary School

3 Seminar Goals: Consider mentoring context
Examine roles and responsibilities of CT, ST and US Identify tools for promoting growth - emphasis on co-teaching Understand framework used to assess ST progress

4 16 KAR 5:040: Admission, Placement & Supervision in Student Teaching*
Three part training required by EPSB Part a: from EPSB (instructions provided at end of this training) Part b: This training Part c: Conducted by university faculty prior to placement Section 2 (5, b) Section 5 (6, b)

5 EPSB Regulation 16 KAR 5:040, Sections 2 and 5

6 Key Terms: ST = Student Teacher CT = Cooperating Teacher
US = University Supervisor KTS = Kentucky Teacher Standards KTIP = Kentucky Teacher Internship Program CCC = Common Core Content PD = Professional Development PGP = Professional Growth Plan B= Benefits PP=Potential Problems

7 Supervision/Mentoring
Guiding, supporting, assessing ST To promote teacher effectiveness In relation to student growth

8 Teacher Quality Matters:
Students with an effective teacher realized achievement gains of 1.5 grade levels compared to 0.5 for students with an ineffective teacher as much as four years later. Strong, M. (2009). Induction programs and the development of teaching practice. In Effective teacher induction and mentoring: Assessing the evidence (p. 47). New York: Teachers College Press.

9 Does mentoring matter? Consider these reports …
Forty percent of teachers leaving the profession cite lack of support as the primary reason for their decision. Induction programs that provide new teachers with intensive mentoring significantly reduce attrition rates and increase student achievement. Ingersol, R. (2012). Beginning teacher induction: what the data tell us. Phi Delta Kappen, 93(8),

10 And this comment: … being in the classroom was the most beneficial experience … every day for the entire semester really helped me to learn the ways of teaching and the life of a teacher.” (Student teacher perception evaluation)

11 Student Teacher Concerns
1. Survival 2. Performance 3. Impact Fuller, F. (1969). Concerns of teachers: A developmental conceptualization. American Educational Researcher, 6,

12 Student Teacher Concerns
What were yours when you were a student teacher?

13 Roles and Responsibilities
Student Teacher (ST) Cooperating Teacher (CT) University Supervisor (US) The primary roles of the professional partners for co-teaching in Kentucky are the teacher candidate who is student teaching, the cooperating teacher who is the P-12 teacher who supervises the teacher candidate and the university supervisor who represents the college/university and serves as a liaison between the cooperating teacher and the teacher candidate. The professional partners have responsibilities during the student teaching experience. The specifics for each professional partner’s roles and responsibilities should be located in the teacher candidate’s particular college/university education handbook. General responsibilities of each professional partner were identified by higher education professionals. The next slides will be individually targeted toward each professional partner and their roles and responsibilities.

14 Cooperating Teacher Responsibilities
The roles and responsibilities of the cooperating teacher are: Model best practices in education; teacher candidate/student teacher shall not have the responsibility for the supervision or instruction of P-12 students without the direct supervision of a certified educator (as per 16 KAR 5:040); become acquainted with the teacher candidate/student teacher’s background and use this information to provide the best professional guidance and support; know the university/college expectations for supervising a teacher candidate/student teacher; and the fifth; collaborate with the university supervisor to guide the professional growth of the teacher candidate. Examples: Do NOT go to the teacher’s lounge and leave the student candidate/student teacher alone to teach a lesson unsupervised; Read the college/university college of education handbook prior to the student candidate starting the student teaching placement. Five points have been identified in this slide as general roles and responsibilities of the cooperating teacher. The cooperating teacher is a P-12 teacher who supervises the teacher candidate during their student teaching experience. The five points include: (list 5 points). An example of the roles and responsibilities of the cooperating teacher is to become familiar with the college/universities policies and procedures on supervising a teacher candidate during their student teaching experience.

15 Compare your list with this one:
Model best practices Don’t leave ST alone in classroom Learn about ST Know supervision policies Collaborate with US about ST progress Orient ST to school/classroom policies/procedures Involve ST in standards’ based co-teaching experiences Co-plan, co-implement, co- reflect Provide frequent, written and/or verbal progress reports documenting strength and growth areas Determine growth plan with resources The roles and responsibilities of the cooperating teacher are: Model best practices in education; teacher candidate/student teacher shall not have the responsibility for the supervision or instruction of P-12 students without the direct supervision of a certified educator (as per 16 KAR 5:040); become acquainted with the teacher candidate/student teacher’s background and use this information to provide the best professional guidance and support; know the university/college expectations for supervising a teacher candidate/student teacher; and the fifth; collaborate with the university supervisor to guide the professional growth of the teacher candidate. Examples: Do NOT go to the teacher’s lounge and leave the student candidate/student teacher alone to teach a lesson unsupervised; Read the college/university college of education handbook prior to the student candidate starting the student teaching placement. Five points have been identified in this slide as general roles and responsibilities of the cooperating teacher. The cooperating teacher is a P-12 teacher who supervises the teacher candidate during their student teaching experience. The five points include: (list 5 points). An example of the roles and responsibilities of the cooperating teacher is to become familiar with the college/universities policies and procedures on supervising a teacher candidate during their student teaching experience.

16 University Supervisor Responsibilities
The roles and responsibilities of the university supervisor: Provide program information to cooperating teacher and teacher candidate/student teacher; provide expertise and a perspective of best practices that is independent of the specific school setting; know and support the use of co-teaching strategies; confer with the cooperating teacher and teacher candidate/student teacher at regular intervals to assess and discuss the progress and needs of the teacher candidate; and the fifth; provide leadership and intervention of any issues that arise. Examples: In the beginning of the student teaching experience, set up a meeting time to visit with the cooperating teacher and teacher candidate to go over the teacher education handbook on student teaching and provide them with copies of the forms that are required to be filled out; Have the cooperating teacher and the teacher candidate watch the modules on co-teaching together; If a teacher candidate is coming to school late every day, the cooperating teacher will contact the university supervisor to intervene. represents the college/university during the student teaching experience. Their role is to serve as a liaison between the cooperating teacher and the teacher candidate as well as evaluate and give feedback to the teacher candidate. Five general points have been identified for the roles and responsibilities of the university supervisor. They include (list five points). An example of the university supervisor’s roles and responsibilities are to observe and document the teacher candidate on a regular basis and give feedback to the cooperating teacher and the teacher candidate for the candidate’s professional growth.

17 Compare your list with this one:
Provide ST and CT with program information Lend best practice expertise and perspective Support use of co-teaching strategies Confer with CT and ST frequently to continually assess and guide ST progress Provide leadership and intervention as needed The roles and responsibilities of the university supervisor: Provide program information to cooperating teacher and teacher candidate/student teacher; provide expertise and a perspective of best practices that is independent of the specific school setting; know and support the use of co-teaching strategies; confer with the cooperating teacher and teacher candidate/student teacher at regular intervals to assess and discuss the progress and needs of the teacher candidate; and the fifth; provide leadership and intervention of any issues that arise. Examples: In the beginning of the student teaching experience, set up a meeting time to visit with the cooperating teacher and teacher candidate to go over the teacher education handbook on student teaching and provide them with copies of the forms that are required to be filled out; Have the cooperating teacher and the teacher candidate watch the modules on co-teaching together; If a teacher candidate is coming to school late every day, the cooperating teacher will contact the university supervisor to intervene. represents the college/university during the student teaching experience. Their role is to serve as a liaison between the cooperating teacher and the teacher candidate as well as evaluate and give feedback to the teacher candidate. Five general points have been identified for the roles and responsibilities of the university supervisor. They include (list five points). An example of the university supervisor’s roles and responsibilities are to observe and document the teacher candidate on a regular basis and give feedback to the cooperating teacher and the teacher candidate for the candidate’s professional growth.

18 Student Teacher Responsibilities
The role and responsibilities for the teacher candidate are: adhere to school polices & procedures; prepare by becoming familiar with all classroom materials and resources; be knowledge and practice appropriate co-teaching concepts and strategies; develop professional rapport and maintain appropriate teacher-student relationships; behave and be a role model for your students and the sixth; be punctual and prepared for your class. Examples: Arrive 15 minutes before class starts; Review your class materials the evening before so that you are knowledgeable of the content prior to teaching it.

19 Compare your list with this one:
Follow policies and procedures Learn about material, curriculum, standards Practice co-teaching strategies Maintain appropriate teacher- student relationship Dress, speak, act appropriately Serve as role model for students Be punctual, prepared present every day Take initiative Seek constructive criticism Keep information confidential Participate in all PD and school activities suggested CT, US The role and responsibilities for the teacher candidate are: adhere to school polices & procedures; prepare by becoming familiar with all classroom materials and resources; be knowledge and practice appropriate co-teaching concepts and strategies; develop professional rapport and maintain appropriate teacher-student relationships; behave and be a role model for your students and the sixth; be punctual and prepared for your class. Examples: Arrive 15 minutes before class starts; Review your class materials the evening before so that you are knowledgeable of the content prior to teaching it.

20 University Policies and Procedures:
uky.edu.OFE/files/documents/FieldGuide.pdf The roles and responsibilities of the university supervisor: Provide program information to cooperating teacher and teacher candidate/student teacher; provide expertise and a perspective of best practices that is independent of the specific school setting; know and support the use of co-teaching strategies; confer with the cooperating teacher and teacher candidate/student teacher at regular intervals to assess and discuss the progress and needs of the teacher candidate; and the fifth; provide leadership and intervention of any issues that arise. Examples: In the beginning of the student teaching experience, set up a meeting time to visit with the cooperating teacher and teacher candidate to go over the teacher education handbook on student teaching and provide them with copies of the forms that are required to be filled out; Have the cooperating teacher and the teacher candidate watch the modules on co-teaching together; If a teacher candidate is coming to school late every day, the cooperating teacher will contact the university supervisor to intervene. represents the college/university during the student teaching experience. Their role is to serve as a liaison between the cooperating teacher and the teacher candidate as well as evaluate and give feedback to the teacher candidate. Five general points have been identified for the roles and responsibilities of the university supervisor. They include (list five points). An example of the university supervisor’s roles and responsibilities are to observe and document the teacher candidate on a regular basis and give feedback to the cooperating teacher and the teacher candidate for the candidate’s professional growth.

21 Supporting Assessing Mentoring
Prepare for ST arrival Orient ST to class and school Launch co-teaching partnership Co-plan Co-teach Co-reflect Assess ST progress We begin by listing key tasks involved in effective supervision. Please link

22 Co-Teaching Strategies
Emphasize active engagement of CT and ST in all aspects of instruction from first day Must include planning, teaching, and reflection As indicated earlier, co teaching occurs when two teachers (in this case the cooperating teacher and the teacher candidate) work together in a classroom with groups of students; sharing the planning, organization, delivery, and assessment of instruction, as well as the physical space. Both teachers are actively involved and engaged in all aspects of instruction. It is not simply dividing the tasks and responsibilities among two people. The purpose of Module II is to discuss and share with you a variety of co-teaching strategies. We will specifically address six strategies. They are listed on the next slide.

23 Co-Teaching Essentials
Plan together Instruct together Reflect together Use co-teaching strategies Engage CT and ST right away Choose strategy based on goals Picture from:

24 Seven Co-Teaching Strategies
One Teach; One Observe One Teach; One Assist Station Teaching Supplemental Teacher Parallel Teaching Alternative Teaching Team Teaching We will address each one as they apply to a co teaching situation with a cooperating teacher and teacher candidate. Each of these will address three specific pieces of information 1) how it is defined in our Kentucky model; 2) some specific examples of how it can be used in a classroom; and 3) Some pros and cons regarding the strategy and some characteristics used to describe it; There is no hierarchy to these strategies. They lend themselves to a variety of applications. Likewise, there is no specific amount of time each one should be utilized. The strategy utilized can variety within each lesson and multiple strategies can easily be applied. Thus, the Need for planning together. Co-teaching is effective for students with a variety of instructional needs, including English language learners, special needs, as well as the range of abilities from low to high.

25 One Teach; One Observe Picture from: The first of the 7 co-teaching strategies is “One Teach – One Observe.” The 7 co-teaching strategies are not designed to be hierarchical, or performed in a specific order. However, the “one teach – one observe” co-teaching strategy is useful to introduce early in the Clinical Practice semester because the Teacher Candidate (TC) is becoming acquainted with the Cooperating Teacher’s (CT) classroom contextual factors, routines, and interpersonal relationships. When using this strategy, one teacher (either the TC or CT) has primary responsibility for instruction while the other observes and records information about students or instruction. The strategy is intended for the TC and CT to take turns in the observational role in order to develop a close awareness of the instructional and classroom dynamics. Importantly, the key to “One Teach / One Observe” is to have a focus for the observation. This focus is jointly decided upon prior to instruction. Prior to an observation, the co-teachers discuss and agree on a system for recording observational data. The method they choose may be in the form of a checklist, a seating chart to record teacher – to - student and student - to - student discourse, or simply anecdotal notes. The co-teachers discuss the observation and its data during a post – observation conference and use this information to plan instruction and behavior management. The “One Teach / One Observe” co – teaching strategy is simple enough to use, but its impact may be limited if an observation focus and the system for recording observational data is neglected. To isolate the focus for the co-teacher’s observation, it is strongly recommended that the co-teachers examine the Kentucky Teacher Standards to serve as the benchmark for performance. Following the observation, the standards should be re-visited in a way that encourages growth and self - reflection. If you were to observe this in the classroom, you would find one teacher in the from (usually) directing the instruction to the group. The other teacher (CP or TC) will be located in the room so as to not interrupt instruction, but also strategically, so whatever is to be observed can be viewed for data collection. This is a visual to represent this concept.

26 One Teach; One Assist Picture from This represents a visual of the model. The assist teacher is at the side, constantly monitoring each student for understanding, providing assistance to specific individuals, checking work and progress, and cueing or encouraging students. Remember the person either the Teacher Candidate (TC) or the Cooperating Teacher (CT) will be positioned with whomever they are assisting. The person would usually move around the room throughout the classroom instruction. The person who is assisting will be careful to not interrupt instruction or be disturbing the participation of any student.

27 Station Teaching Picture from: approach is where the co-teaching pair divide the instructional content into parts. Each teacher instructs one of the groups. Groups rotate or spend a designated amount of time at each station. An independent station can be utilized along with teacher led stations. The independent station has materials for each student at their “independent” functioning level. This requires a very diverse station with multiple levels and types of materials. Many teachers utilize technology to accomplish this. Great blog for Station Teaching:

28 Parallel Teaching Picture from: This is a visual of what parallel teaching might look like in the classroom.

29 Supplemental Teaching

30 Alternative (Differentiated) Teaching
Left picture from: Right picture from: are some considerations to consider on when this model can be best utilized. Some guidelines include: When students must master the concepts taught or from a pre-assessment data, the concepts to be taught vary greatly. When high levels of mastery are expected for each student in the classroom When enrichment is desired for students. This particularly can be helpful if pre-assessment indicates a student already knows the concept while the rest of the class does not. When some students are utilizing the alternative or parallel curriculum approach---this would be useful with special needs or ELL students.

31 Team Teaching Teacher candidate and cooperating teacher both are teaching in the class together, both fully engaged in leading the delivery of core instruction at the same time. Teacher candidate and cooperating teacher simultaneously provide instruction with both teachers sharing responsibility for student achievement. The teacher candidate and the cooperating teacher share responsibilities for all students; planning, teaching, assessing the progress of the students. The two teachers (teacher candidate and cooperating teacher) may have different but equally active roles; one leading in the large-group lesson while the other models note-taking or restates key concepts for clarification. Team teaching allows for more interaction between students and the two teachers in the classroom Research supports higher student achievement when team teaching is incorporated into instruction.

32 Remember Connect co-teaching to KTS, KTIP, CCC
Choose strategies based on student needs Incorporate RTI Co-planning and co-reflection are critical No hierarchy in co-teaching strategies Strategies facilitate meaningful ST experience, promote student learning There is a handout located on the website. This handout is designed for the Cooperating Teacher and Teacher Candidate to see how the building of teacher standards occurs along with the Co-Teaching Strategies. Strategies must be chosen based on student needs. They can be an excellent way to keep data and document for RtI. It is critical to not just implement co-teaching, but rather to concentrate on co-planning prior to the lesson and also the co-reflection after the lesson is complete. Both of these contribute highly to the growth and understanding of data use for the TC. There is no specific amount of times to use any one strategy or any requirement on how many times to use the strategies. These should become a natural way of teaching in order to meet student needs.

33 Why Connect KTS, KTIP & Co-Teaching?
Example Why Connect KTS, KTIP & Co-Teaching? 16 KAR 5:040 Section 6(6) (6) The educator preparation program shall use the Kentucky Teacher Internship Program Teacher Performance Assessment tasks established in 16 KAR 7:010, Section 2, or a variation of these tasks to meet the requirement specified in subsection (5) of this section.

34 Now, review the standards
Demonstrates applied content knowledge Designs and plans instruction Creates and maintains learning climate Implements and manages instruction Assesses and communicates learning results Demonstrates the implementation of technology Reflects on and evaluates teaching and learning Collaborates with colleagues/parents/others Evaluates teaching and implements PD Provides leadership in school/community/profession The Kentucky Teacher Standards (KTS) are integrated into many of the models presented. For instance, KTS 1: Demonstrates Applied Criteria would be included in all models, but would be visible in station teaching, team teaching, parallel teaching, supplemental teaching, and alternative teaching. KTS#3 would be included in all the models as the environment of all would include high expectations, be positive, value and support diversity and address individual needs and foster respect between both teachers and the students. KTS#4 would be obvious as the models are selected based upon the needs of the student, assessment data, and would actively engage the students. Specific models that enhance HOT would be the supplemental teaching, one teach-one assist, alternative teaching, and station teaching. KTS #5 is necessary in all the models as they are based upon data. Some that lend themselves easier to this would be the station teaching (one could have an assessment station), as well as the teach-observe (keeping data), and the supplemental or alternative teaching models. The communication between teachers and students and parents as well as the use of formative assessments should be included in all the models. KTS #6: the use of technology can easily be incorporated into the station teaching, the alternative or supplemental teaching, as well as one teach-one assist. The idea of using the technology should be planned in any of the models so it is used effectively. The Flipped Classroom model could easily become a station to assist both teachers in providing additional instruction or pre-instruction to students. KTS #8: Obviously, use of any of the models requires the Teacher Candidate and the Cooperative Teacher to collaborate and plan (see the section on co-planning). All of the components of collaboration can easily be displayed in use of co-teaching models.

35 Connecting KTS, KTIP & Co-Teaching
Example Connecting KTS, KTIP & Co-Teaching Now, look at KTS 5 (Student Assessment) Why is this standard important? How would you use this in co-teaching?

36 Example Through co-reflection To plan meaningful assessments To reflect about results (see KTIP Task C document)

37 Now, review KTS 5 Indicators
5.1 Uses pre-assessments 5.2 Uses formative assessments 5.3 Uses summative assessments 5.4 Describes, analyzes, evaluates student performance data 5.5 Communicates results to students & parents 5.6 Allows for student self-assessment

38 Are any indicators difficult to use in
co-teaching?

39 Remember Together Together: Design assessments Analyze assessment data
Determine next steps

40 Assessing Growth Using Observation Strategies
Name two strategies for collecting observational data

41 Compare your strategies to these:
Scripting Seating Charts KTIP IPR

42 Co-Reflection Strategies
Name two strategies for reflecting together

43 Compare your strategies to these:
Focus on critical data Clarify ambiguous points Discuss most and least effective instructional strategies Determine next steps Consider growth areas for ST (PGP)

44 Together US and CT consider:
Course syllabus (map of experience) Performance assessment instruments and procedures Professional Growth Plan How to address concerns as needed

45 When Supervising, Remember
KTS structure supervision KTIP is core performance assessment CCC heart of co-teaching and career and college readiness

46 Links to Training Resources
Instructions for completing 16 KAR 5:040 Part A: Click here to access the instructions The following are resources to use when you are working together: Handout Link: Online PowerPoint Video Links: School-Based Co-Teaching: https://vimeo.com/ University-Based Co-Teaching: https://vimeo.com/ Supplemental Teaching Secondary: Elementary_2_0001.wmv Station Teaching: stations A handout is provided for the Kentucky Teacher Standards and the sections of the training module. It would be helpful for the viewers to have this in front of them as the information is presented. Also, videos of each teaching model of co-teaching are provided. Some are provided in all three levels (elementary, middle and high), while some are provided in only one. There is also a video to catch a glimpse of how these models can be utilized within the college teaching programs.

47 Completion of 16 KAR 5:040 Section 2 (5,a) and 5 (6,b) for Cooperating Teachers
For CTs: Go to Create or log in to your account Enter the group code given in the EPSB’s “Directions for Edmodo” The assessment will be available under the latest posts of the CT group The bibliography contains resources that discuss roles and responsibilities on co-teaching. For further information on individual college/university student teaching requirements, please review your teacher education handbook at your college or university.

48 Completion of 16 KAR 5:040 Section 2 (5,a) and 5 (6,b) for University Supervisors
For USs: Go to Create or log in to your account Enter the group code given in the EPSB’s “Directions for Edmodo” The assessment will be available under the latest posts of the US group The bibliography contains resources that discuss roles and responsibilities on co-teaching. For further information on individual college/university student teaching requirements, please review your teacher education handbook at your college or university.

49 References Darragh, J. J., et al. (2011). "When Teachers Collaborate, Good Things Happen: Teacher Candidate Perspectives of the Co-Teach Model for the Student Teaching Internship." AILACTE Journal 8: Friend, M. , & Cook, L. (2013). Interactions: Collaboration Skills for School Professionals. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education Inc. Larkin, D.B. (2013). “10 Things to Know About Mentoring Student Teachers.” Kappan 94 (7), Teacher Quality Enhancement Center, College of Education, St. Cloud State University. (2010). Mentoring Teacher Candidates Through Co-Teaching Collaboration that Makes a Difference. St. Cloud, Minnesota. The bibliography contains resources that discuss roles and responsibilities on co-teaching. For further information on individual college/university student teaching requirements, please review your teacher education handbook at your college or university.

50 Ideas, Resources, Questions
Are there concerns and/or questions that remain about your mentoring role? Are there ideas and/or resources you want to share? The bibliography contains resources that discuss roles and responsibilities on co-teaching. For further information on individual college/university student teaching requirements, please review your teacher education handbook at your college or university.


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