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Connecting Early Career Teacher Mentoring to Classroom Success Presented by… Dr. Kent Runyan Dr. Marilyn Dishman-Horst Dr. Howard Smith Dr. Robin Dexter.

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Presentation on theme: "Connecting Early Career Teacher Mentoring to Classroom Success Presented by… Dr. Kent Runyan Dr. Marilyn Dishman-Horst Dr. Howard Smith Dr. Robin Dexter."— Presentation transcript:

1 Connecting Early Career Teacher Mentoring to Classroom Success Presented by… Dr. Kent Runyan Dr. Marilyn Dishman-Horst Dr. Howard Smith Dr. Robin Dexter PITTSBURG STATE UNIVERSITY Kansas Association of School Board’s 91 st Conference Wichita, Kansas December 2008

2 The American public school is facing a major hurdle! There will not be enough qualified teachers to teach in our classrooms!

3 Teacher Turnover Rates Nationally, 16% of all teachers change jobs each year Nationally, 16% of all teachers change jobs each year 8% of all turnover is caused by teachers who move between schools. 8% of all turnover is caused by teachers who move between schools. 8% is caused by teachers who leave the field. 8% is caused by teachers who leave the field. (Changed professions 4%; Retired 2%; Other 2%). (Changed professions 4%; Retired 2%; Other 2%) % of Kansas teachers turnover each year 16.3 % of Kansas teachers turnover each year (7% move between schools; 9% leave the field - retired 2.0%) Source: National Center for Education Statistics, The Condition of Education, Source: Kansas Legislative Post Audit, School Districts Performance Audit Report, 2006

4 Teacher Turnover Rates Nationally, 33% of all beginning teachers leave within 3 years. Nationally, 33% of all beginning teachers leave within 3 years. 37% of all Kansas teachers leave the field within 5 years 37% of all Kansas teachers leave the field within 5 years 42% of all Kansas teachers leave the field within 7 years 42% of all Kansas teachers leave the field within 7 years Source: National Center for Education Statistics, The Condition of Education, Source: Kansas Legislative Post Audit, School Districts Performance Audit Report, 2006

5 Teacher Turnover Rates Nationally, 25% of all teacher attrition is from retirees Nationally, 25% of all teacher attrition is from retirees The percentage of teachers who are eligible to retire is increasing. The percentage of teachers who are eligible to retire is increasing. 51% of all Kansas teachers are over 45 years of age 51% of all Kansas teachers are over 45 years of age 34% of all Kansas teachers are over 50 years of age 34% of all Kansas teachers are over 50 years of age 24% of all Kansas teachers will be eligible to retire in the next 5 years 24% of all Kansas teachers will be eligible to retire in the next 5 years Source: National Center for Education Statistics, The Condition of Education, Source: Kansas Legislative Post Audit, School Districts Performance Audit Report, 2006 “The number of teachers eligible to retire will continue to increase and will likely worsen the teacher shortage.”

6 Teacher Turnover Rates Nationally, the number of potential new teachers is not significantly increasing. In Kansas, the number of students earning bachelor’s degrees in education has increased only slightly over the past six years; In Kansas, the number of students earning bachelor’s degrees in education has increased only slightly over the past six years; 1,200 in 1999 to 1,347 in 20051,200 in 1999 to 1,347 in 2005 Total turnover for 2005 was 5,380 with 2,574 moving between schools leaving a demand for 2,806. Total turnover for 2005 was 5,380 with 2,574 moving between schools leaving a demand for 2,806. Source: National Center for Education Statistics, The Condition of Education, Source: Kansas Legislative Post Audit, School Districts Performance Audit Report, 2006

7 Teacher Turnover Rates Nationally, present shortages of qualified teachers exists for certain subjects. Nationally, 12% of all teachers are teaching subjects they are not qualified to teach. Nationally, 12% of all teachers are teaching subjects they are not qualified to teach. Vocational education (37%), Math (14%), Science (10%) and English (6%) are the most problematic. Vocational education (37%), Math (14%), Science (10%) and English (6%) are the most problematic. In Kansas, teacher shortages are worst in: In Kansas, teacher shortages are worst in: Special education (17%), Foreign Language (11%), Vocational Education (10%), Science (9%), Math (7%) Special education (17%), Foreign Language (11%), Vocational Education (10%), Science (9%), Math (7%) Source: National Center for Education Statistics, The Condition of Education, Source: Kansas Legislative Post Audit, School Districts Performance Audit Report, 2006

8 Extent of Teacher Shortages Nationally, the present teacher shortage is characterized primarily by teachers who teach out of field rather than actual vacancies. For example, in Kansas ( ) only 5.4% of all positions were filled by a “out-of-field” teacher where only.5% were left vacant. For example, in Kansas ( ) only 5.4% of all positions were filled by a “out-of-field” teacher where only.5% were left vacant. Source: National Center for Education Statistics, The Condition of Education, Source: Kansas Legislative Post Audit, School Districts Performance Audit Report, 2006

9 Extent of Teacher Turnover Nationally, schools in high poverty areas have greater turnover and thus a higher proportion of positions to fill. The annual turnover rate for high-poverty schools is 20% compared to 13% to low poverty. The annual turnover rate for high-poverty schools is 20% compared to 13% to low poverty. In Kansas, the annual turnover rate for high-poverty schools is 22% compared to 14% to low poverty. In Kansas, retirement and spousal relocation were main reasons for leaving. In Kansas, the annual turnover rate for high-poverty schools is 22% compared to 14% to low poverty. In Kansas, retirement and spousal relocation were main reasons for leaving. Source: National Center for Education Statistics, The Condition of Education, Source: Kansas Legislative Post Audit, School Districts Performance Audit Report, 2006

10 Teacher Shortage Conclusion As the teaching force continues to age and the number of teachers who are eligible to retire continue to grow, demand will continue to increase. Unless we are able to attract new teachers or retain current teachers, the pending growth in retirement is likely to exacerbate the current teacher shortage.

11 Teacher Shortage Conclusion Mandating a mentoring program is considered one of the most beneficial practices for retaining teachers. A quality mentoring program is one of the most often-cited strategies to retain teachers and has shown positive success: Framework for Supporting Teachers (Thibodaux, LA)88% over 3 years New Teacher Project (Santa Cruz, CA) 95% over 12 years Pathways to Teaching Careers (Savannah, GA)100% over 5 years Teacher Induction Program (Corpus Cristi, TX)100% over 5 years Source: “Teacher Isolation: How Mentoring Can Help” by K.L.Heider

12 Kansas Early Career Teachers Academy The Academy is one of the oldest and largest collaborative teacher induction programs in Kansas. The program has evolved over the past twelve years. A collaborative effort with: Pittsburg State University USD 250 and USD 246, 248, 404, 447, 493, 499 Southeast Kansas Special Education Interlocal 637

13 Both Early Career Professionals and Mentors participated in: Eight Monthly Seminars Weekly School Interactions Concluding KSDE Conference Graduation Banquet Structure: Year-Long Meetings

14 Food is served at every session. This helps set a professional atmosphere and gives time for interaction. Structure: Monthly Meetings - Food, Food, Food

15 To conclude the year, both the mentor and early career professional are invited to attend the KSDE Conference in Wichita. Structure: Year-End Conference

16 During the conference, mentor and mentee room together and select the sessions they want to attend. In the evening they attend an Academy symposium. Structure: Year-End Conference

17 To end the year, the Academy hosts a graduation banquet where certificates of completion are given and mentees share what they learned about teaching. Structure: Year-end Graduation Banquet

18 The program trainers include: Dr. Kent Runyan, Mentor Trainer Dr. Rozanne Sparks, 1st year, 1st year Early Career Trainer Dr. Marilyn Dishman-Horst, 2/ 3rd year, Early Career Trainer Mrs. Amanda Hill, Program Coordinator Structure: Trainers

19 Structure: Participants Early Career Teachers (First through third year) Early Career Teachers (Post tenure requesting peer assistance) Early Career Special Education Professionals (First through third year) Early Career Special Education Professionals (Requesting peer assistance) Classroom Mentors Selected for: positive attitude proximity discipline/grade similarity instructional proficiency

20 Three hours of graduate college credit is made available to all participants during the spring semester. Local school districts pay a $ to $1, stipend to serve as a mentor. Structure: Stipends and College Graduate Credit

21 School district cost is $ per Mentor/Early Career Teacher and covers materials, seminar dinners, trainer & speaker stipends, hotel rooms, and banquets.School district cost is $ per Mentor/Early Career Teacher and covers materials, seminar dinners, trainer & speaker stipends, hotel rooms, and banquets. Individual school districts will be responsible for KSDE’s Wichita conference registration fee, substitute costs, and travel.Individual school districts will be responsible for KSDE’s Wichita conference registration fee, substitute costs, and travel. Structure: Participant Fee Funding

22 With each early career professional and mentor, a Confidentiality Agreement is signed to clearly understand that no activity will be used for formal performance assessment in contract renewal or dismissal. Structure: Confidentiality Agreement

23 A No Fault, Easy Out Policy Form is also signed, if needed, to allow for a process to change the early career/mentor assignment. Structure: No Fault, Easy Out Policy Form

24 With each early career professional and mentor, a Collaborative Professional Development Plan is used to focus classroom activities each semester. Each plan outlines objectives, planned activities, intended timeline, and verification documentation. Types of CPDP Objectives Knowledge: What you want to know that you did not know before? Application: What you want to do that you did not do before? Impact: How do you want to change student performance or classroom? Structure: Collaborative Professional Development Plans

25 All Academy participants are linked through the Internet by . Here, all early career professionals and mentors will have access to each other on a daily basis through s. At times, questions will foster diverse “discussion” and updated information will be made available. Structure: Electronic Communication

26 The program is open to all 1st, 2nd and 3rd year professionals and focused on: Increasing Student AchievementIncreasing Student Achievement Improving Instruction and ManagementImproving Instruction and Management Socializing Professionals to the School CultureSocializing Professionals to the School Culture Reducing Isolation for New ProfessionalsReducing Isolation for New Professionals Retaining Professionals with Long Term PotentialRetaining Professionals with Long Term Potential Developing Collegiality Among ProfessionalsDeveloping Collegiality Among Professionals Goals and Materials: Early Career Teacher Goals

27 Early Career Training Manual Found in the Early Career Training Manual the professional materials include such items as: Course SyllabusCourse Syllabus Orientation ChecklistOrientation Checklist Activity Time LineActivity Time Line Teaching StylesTeaching Styles Parent ConferencingParent Conferencing Management StrategiesManagement Strategies Kansas Performance Assessment MaterialsKansas Performance Assessment Materials Local USD Professional Development InitiativesLocal USD Professional Development Initiatives Goals and Materials: Early Career Materials

28 School and Community OrientationSchool and Community Orientation Effective Parent Professional ConferencesEffective Parent Professional Conferences Student Learning StylesStudent Learning Styles Classroom Management StrategiesClassroom Management Strategies ESOL StrategiesESOL Strategies Positive DisciplinePositive Discipline High Expectations for Every ChildHigh Expectations for Every Child IDEA and the Classroom TeacherIDEA and the Classroom Teacher The Internet for Effective Lesson PlanningThe Internet for Effective Lesson Planning National Board CertificationNational Board Certification Ending the Year RightEnding the Year Right Throughout the years, various instructional leaders covered important educational topics tied to local school initiatives and common beginning teacher concerns: Goals and Materials: Classroom Teacher Topics

29 What It Is Like To Be HandicappedWhat It Is Like To Be Handicapped Positive Behavioral SupportPositive Behavioral Support Attachment DisordersAttachment Disorders Adapting CurriculumAdapting Curriculum IDEA and LegislationIDEA and Legislation Autism UpdateAutism Update SEKSEC Structure and PersonnelSEKSEC Structure and Personnel Compliance IssuesCompliance Issues IEP’s and Behavior PlansIEP’s and Behavior Plans Accommodations and ModificationsAccommodations and Modifications Parent Professional ConferencesParent Professional Conferences Special Education Internet SitesSpecial Education Internet Sites Goals and Materials: Special Education Topics Throughout the years, various instructional leaders covered important educational topics tied to special education concerns:

30 Mentors were trained and expected to: Conceptualize the general characteristics, needs, concerns, and expectations of the beginning professional.Conceptualize the general characteristics, needs, concerns, and expectations of the beginning professional. Interact and communicate in a non-threatening, supportive manner.Interact and communicate in a non-threatening, supportive manner. Assess specific classroom needs using checklists, assessment instruments, and personal conferences.Assess specific classroom needs using checklists, assessment instruments, and personal conferences. Analyze, focus, and support specific classroom needs using peer coaching techniques.Analyze, focus, and support specific classroom needs using peer coaching techniques. Use data collection instruments in observing class activities.Use data collection instruments in observing class activities. Incorporate the personal, professional, and personality needs of the beginning professional into activities and interactions.Incorporate the personal, professional, and personality needs of the beginning professional into activities and interactions. Implement developmental activities that will offer additional knowledge, skills, and attitudes for successful teaching performance.Implement developmental activities that will offer additional knowledge, skills, and attitudes for successful teaching performance. Serve effectively as a developmental mentor who can provide an orderly, personalized transition.Serve effectively as a developmental mentor who can provide an orderly, personalized transition. Goals and Materials: Mentor Goals

31 The Mentorship Why Become a Mentor Characteristics of Beginning Professionals Mentor Communication Activities Mentor Characteristics The Mentorship Manual Orientation Checklist Activity Time Line Conferencing and Coaching Guidelines Teaching and Learning Styles Instruments Classroom Data Collection Instruments Video-taping Guidelines Kansas Performance Assessment Guidelines National Board Certification Portfolio Material Goals and Materials: Mentor Materials Mentor Training Manual Found in the Mentor Training Manual the professional materials include such items as:

32 Characteristics and Stages of Beginning Teachers Characteristics of Growth - Oriented Mentors Assessing Professional Needs Assessing Teaching Styles Using the Internet for Mentoring Ideas Bringing About Change in Adults Coaching Another Professional Rogerian Counseling Classroom Observation Instruments Using Video-taping to Help a Beginning Teacher National Board Certification Goals and Materials: Mentor Training Topics Throughout a three year span, various training topics will be covered:

33 Theoretical Framework: Stages of Development As beginning teachers move through their first several years of teaching, they seem to generate concerns in a developmental sequence, even though there are identifiable situational differences. If left unexplored, these concerns could ultimately become dysfunctions which could influence their personal and professional life and stagnate their continued development.

34 Theoretical Framework: Stages of Development Establishing Structures (Survival) Acquiring supplies and establishing room layoutAcquiring supplies and establishing room layout Knowing school policies, norms and cultureKnowing school policies, norms and culture Building collegial staff relationshipsBuilding collegial staff relationships Establishing classroom procedures and routinesEstablishing classroom procedures and routines Setting rules and reinforcing them to gain respect of studentsSetting rules and reinforcing them to gain respect of students Expanding subject matter knowledgeExpanding subject matter knowledge Lesson planning for high time on taskLesson planning for high time on task Coping with evaluation, other’s opinion, and fear of failureCoping with evaluation, other’s opinion, and fear of failure Knowing parents and opening lines of communicationKnowing parents and opening lines of communication

35 Theoretical Framework: Stages of Development Developing the Science of Teaching (Mastery) Using various models of teaching correctlyUsing various models of teaching correctly Acquisition of innovative techniques, activities, and ideasAcquisition of innovative techniques, activities, and ideas Asking classroom questions effectively and providing reviewAsking classroom questions effectively and providing review Providing timely assignment feedback and furnishing justificationProviding timely assignment feedback and furnishing justification Clear direction giving, illustration, and transitionsClear direction giving, illustration, and transitions Identifying learning styles, characteristics, and needs of classIdentifying learning styles, characteristics, and needs of class Providing sponge activities to keep students busyProviding sponge activities to keep students busy Managing time pressuresManaging time pressures

36 Theoretical Framework: Stages of Development Being novel, vivid, and varied in teaching strategiesBeing novel, vivid, and varied in teaching strategies Achieving equity in monitoring, questioning and feedbackAchieving equity in monitoring, questioning and feedback Showing high expectations for every studentShowing high expectations for every student Striving to meet the individual academic, emotional and social needsStriving to meet the individual academic, emotional and social needs Developing consistency in enthusiasm, fairness & humorous dispositionDeveloping consistency in enthusiasm, fairness & humorous disposition Being a role model who shows empathy, warmth, and respectBeing a role model who shows empathy, warmth, and respect Developing the Art of Teaching (Impact) (Impact)

37 Theoretical Framework: Stages of Development The Academy takes the orientation that for long-term improvement to occur one must first see a need and have a desire to improve.

38 Theoretical Framework: Stages of Development The TNAQ tracks the developmental needs of the Academy’s early career professionals throughout the years. It was statistically refined from 112 teaching skills associated with mastery teaching.

39 Theoretical Framework: Stages of Development The TNAQ analysis can highlight individual and class perceived needs.

40 Theoretical Framework: Stages of Development The TNAQ can also identify developmental stages and important interest areas. Levels of stress are measured from -3 to 9.

41 Theoretical Framework: Stages of Development If given at the same time, groups of teachers can be compared.

42 Theoretical Framework: Stages of Development Runyan and Sparks, (2002) Do Traditional Four Year College Training, Teacher Induction, and Alternative Certification Programs Create Different Teachers. A paper presented at the 2002 AACTE conference, New York.

43 Theoretical Framework: Stages of Development If given at different times throughout the first couple years, the TNAQ can show movement through the stages.

44 ?? Questions ?? In this collaborative effort there are specific benefits for: A. Pittsburg State University B.the school districts C.early career teacher D. mentor

45 Visit our website for more information: Contact us: Dr. Charles Kent Runyan, Mentor Trainer, 117-C Hughes Hall, Professor, Department of Curriculum and Instruction, Pittsburg State University, Telephone: Dr. Rozanne Sparks, Early Career Trainer - Kansas Performance Appraisal, 110 Hughes Hall, Director of Teacher Education, Pittsburg State University, Telephone: Dr. Marilyn Dishman-Horst, Early Career Trainer, 117-E Hughes Hall, Assistant Professor, Department of Curriculum and Instruction, Pittsburg State University Telephone: Dr. Robin Dexter, Assistant Superintendent USD Deill, Bevin Education Center Pittsburg, KS Telephone:


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