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Where teachers are central to improving schools

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Presentation on theme: "Where teachers are central to improving schools"— Presentation transcript:

1 Where teachers are central to improving schools
Teacher Working Conditions in Guilford County Public Schools Center for Teaching Quality September 20, 2006

2 Need to Focus on What Matters for Teacher Retention
Avg. NC turnover: 12.95% (04-05) = need for approx. 10,000 teachers annually GCPS Turnover rate of 11.81% (04-05) Consistent turnover in schools leads to instability that can have a direct effect student learning, trust, collaborative culture, etc. Turnover is costly - approximately $11,000 or more for each recruit leaving in the first few years of teaching as conservative estimate Why are they leaving?

3 Working Conditions are the Cause of Dissatisfaction
Source: Richard M. Ingersoll, Teacher Turnover and Teacher Shortages: An Organizational Analysis. American Educational Research Journal, 38 (Fall 2001):

4 Need for School by School Data to Drive both Local and State Reforms
Survey every educator in participating districts in order to gather school data as each is unique in their issues as well as in investments and commitment toward improvement Can assess strengths and areas to improve upon based on what teachers experience everyday Puts teacher voice at the center of school improvement conversations Need for School by School Data to Drive both Local and State Reforms

5 Need Individual, Customized Data to Diagnose and Address TWC Issues in Schools

6 North Carolina TWC Survey in 2006
In 2006, more than 75,000 educators respond to TWC survey across North Carolina Data for almost 2,000 NC schools (compared to 1,100 schools in 2004) All data available online: (www.northcarolinatwc.org) Help desk, incentives, outreach and better understanding of significance Waiting for 2006 Student Achievement and Teacher Retention Data But from 2002 and 2004 results, we know TWC matters: 1) student achievement, 2) teacher retention, and 3) exposes differences between perceptions of principals and teachers on TWC

7 Teaching and Learning Conditions Matter for Student Achievement
Teacher Working Conditions are Student Learning Conditions Teaching and Learning Conditions Matter for Student Achievement

8 Teacher Working Conditions and AYP in NC
Leadership was the single greatest predictor of AYP status at the middle school level, more so than school size and teacher retention. For every one point increase on the TWC survey, MS were almost 6.7 times more likely to have made AYP Schools were 4 times more likely to make AYP for every one point increase on the TWC on professional development For every one point increase on the survey in the facilities and resource domain avg., schools were 2.8 times more likely to make AYP Teacher Working Conditions and AYP in NC

9 Aspect of TWC Important in Promoting Student Learning
Source: GCPS, NC, AZ, OH, NV, KS Teacher Working Conditions Surveys, 2006

10 Time and Empowerment are Critical
“If I am allowed to utilize my teaching expertise—to draw from what I know will engage and stimulate my students—then students will achieve at levels no one could dream of. If I am hampered…then I can’t do what I do best.” - Member, Teacher Leaders Network Time and Empowerment are Critical

11 Teachers Want to Work in Schools Designed for Them to be Successful
Teaching and Learning Conditions Improve Teacher Retention Teachers Want to Work in Schools Designed for Them to be Successful

12 TWC and Teacher Retention in NC in 2004
Empowerment was statistically significant in explaining retention at the high school level Professional development was significant for elementary and high schools School designation category, school size and percentage of students on free and reduced lunch all are significant predictors of teacher retention. Percentage not fully licensed most highly correlated with retention rates TWC and Teacher Retention in NC in 2004

13 Working Conditions are Critical to Keeping
Teacher Working Conditions Survey Question Percent of Teachers Who Agree Stayers Movers Leavers Opportunities are available for members of the community to contribute actively to this school’s success. 71% 26% 48% There is an atmosphere of trust and mutual respect within the school. 66% 22% 44% The school improvement team provides effective leadership at this school. 70% 31% 49% The school leadership support teachers’ efforts to maintain discipline in the classroom. In this school we take steps to solve problems. 67% 28% 47% The school leadership shields teachers from disruptions, allowing teachers to focus on educating students. 62% 25% 41% Working Conditions are Critical to Keeping NC Teachers in Schools

14 School leadership makes a sustained effort to address:
Percentage Agreeing Stayers Movers Leavers The use of time in my school 64.4% 27.0% 39.3% Facilities and Resources 71.7% 38.0% 53.1% Empowerment 62.5% 23.0% 38.6% Leadership 61.6% 22.9% Professional Development 73.1% 40.1% 54.6% New Teacher Support 66.0% 30.4% 46.2% NC Teachers Stay Where They Believe Leadership Makes Efforts to Improve Working Conditions

15 TLC Aspect Most Affects
Willingness to Stay Source: GCPS, NC, AZ, OH, NV, KS Teacher Working Conditions Surveys, 2006

16 Leadership and Empowerment are Critical to Retention
“Without a doubt, the principal is the number one factor in determining the desirability of being a part of a particular school community. Being respected and valued personally and professionally is something I have to have in order to stay in a school.” - Member, Teacher Leaders Network Leadership and Empowerment are Critical to Retention

17 Educators Do Not View Teaching and Learning Conditions Similarly
Teachers and Administrators View Their Schools Differently Educators Do Not View Teaching and Learning Conditions Similarly

18 School leadership makes a sustained effort to address teacher concerns about:
Teachers Agreeing Principals Agreeing The use of time in my school 60.1% 98.4% Facilities and resources 68.0% 98.7% Empowering teachers 57.9% 97.8% Leadership issues 57.2% 97.3% Professional development 69.4% 98.1% New Teacher Support 62.2% 97.4% NC Beliefs that Leadership Makes a Sustained Effort to Address Teacher Concerns

19 Where teachers are central to improving schools
In 2004, GCPS had 28% response rate, no district level data report and only 35 schools w/ data In 2006, GCPS has 70% response rate, with district level data report and 104 schools w/ data available In 2006, 4236 GCPS educators respond to survey Visibility of survey, history of initiative, state and local supports

20 While there are notable concerns, still some good news
GCPS educators more negative than NC on all 5 domain areas of TWC survey Gaps largest in time (time available for collaboration, planning, etc.) While there are notable concerns, still some good news More than 7 in 10 (71%) still agree that their school is a good place to work and learn. 83% agree faculty are committed to helping every student learn Relatively positive on some facilities and induction measures of the survey GCPS TWC 2006 – Data Trends

21 GCPS Relative to NC – Domain Averages
Each Domain Average Represents Composite of Questions on Survey GCPS versus NC Domain Averages GCPS NC Difference Time 2.85 3.12 -.27 Facilities & Resources 3.59 3.65 -.06 Empowerment 3.25 3.44 -.19 Leadership 3.43 3.60 -.17 Professional Development 3.27 3.41 -.14 *All are on a 1-5 scale of agreement with 1 representing lowest and 5 the highest possible score GCPS Relative to NC – Domain Averages

22 Perceptions of Facilities and Resources
Facilities and Resources Areas GCPS NC Teachers have sufficient access to instructional materials & resources 65% 73% Teachers have sufficient access to office equipment and supplies 57% 70% The reliability and speed of Internet connections in this school are sufficient to support instructional practices 82% 74% Teachers have sufficient access to instructional technology 77% Teachers and staff work in a school environment that is safe 72% 83% Perceptions of Facilities and Resources Percent who Agree or Strongly Agree

23 Percent Who Agree or Strongly Agree
Time Areas GCPS NC Teachers have reasonable class sizes 43% 54% Teachers have time available to collaborate w/ colleagues 45% 53% Teachers are protected from duties that interfere w/ essential role of educating students 37% 47% Non-instructional time provided for teachers in my school is sufficient 34% Percent Who Agree or Strongly Agree Perceptions of Time

24 Teachers More Negative than Middle & High
Working Conditions Domain Elementary School Middle School High School Time Domain 3.09 3.19 Facilities and Resources Domain 3.71 3.64 3.53 Empowerment Domain 3.52 3.38 3.36 Leadership Domain 3.68 3.47 3.50 Professional Development Domain 3.46 3.39 3.33 Teachers More Negative than Middle & High Time is only Area Where NC Elementary

25 Finding Time for Teachers
NCPTSC study planning time in elementary with 39 examples of 5 or more hours, on average, per week (www.ncptsc.org) Use of community, full time subs, paras etc. to free up time for collaborative work Principal cover classes to allow observation and planning at South Topsail “Seems to me it is about finding a planning period and a duty free lunch” – that’s half the battle – need to focus on quality as well. How is planning time being used Finding Time for Teachers

26 Percent Who Agree or Strongly Agree Perceptions of Empowerment
Empowerment Areas GCPS NC Teachers are centrally involved in decision making about educational issues 43% 53% Teachers are trusted to make sound professional decisions about instruction 59% 72% Teachers have a large or primary role in selecting instructional materials and resources 37% 52% Teachers have a role in school improvement planning 31% Percent Who Agree or Strongly Agree Perceptions of Empowerment

27 At Half of Teachers…. NC is a National Leader GCPS NC KS AZ OH NV
Teachers are centrally involved in decision making about important educational issues 43 53 44 38 36 35 At Half of Teachers…. NC is a National Leader

28 Leadership teams in 6 middle schools in Orange and Wake Counties as part of distributed leadership model (part of hiring teams and have control over the professional development budget) Each location is different – assess current roles (formal and informal) and consider the knowledge and skills necessary for teachers to assume new responsibilities in a collaborative setting Empowering Teachers

29 Percent Who Agree or Strongly Agree Perceptions of Leadership
Leadership Areas GCPS NC The school leadership consistently enforces rules for student conduct 46% 57% The school leadership supports teachers’ efforts to maintain discipline 56% 68% The school leadership shields teachers from disruptions 49% 60% The school leadership consistently supports teachers 58% 67% There is an atmosphere of trust and mutual respect within this school 55% 64% Percent Who Agree or Strongly Agree Perceptions of Leadership

30 Perceptions of Professional Development
Professional Development Areas GCPS NC Sufficient funds and resources are available to allow teachers to take advantage of PD opportunities 38% 50% Teachers have sufficient training to fully utilize instructional technology 49% 57% PD provides teachers with the knowledge and skills most needed to teach effectively 59% 64% I need additional support in classroom management techniques 28% 23% Strategies learned in PD for classroom management were useful for efforts to improve student achievement 85% 90% Perceptions of Professional Development Percent Who Agree or Strongly Agree

31 Perceptions of Professional Development
Professional Development Areas GCPS NC Special Education (students with disabilities) 49% 50% Closing the Achievement Gap 43% 41% Limited English Proficiently 42% Perceptions of Professional Development Areas of Greatest Need Every other PD area; Academically Gifted; Content Area; Methods of Teaching; Student Assessment; Classroom Management and Reading Strategies comes in under 30% for GCPS and the State

32 Percent of Educators Who Say Mentor Helped GCPS NC
Mentor was effective in providing support with instructional strategies 53% 55% Mentor was effective providing support with curriculum and subject that I teach 48% 47% Mentor was effective providing support in completing documentation required of new teachers 64% Percent who say Mentor Helped “a lot” or critical Perceptions of Mentoring & Induction

33 Educators Do Not View Teaching and Learning Conditions Similarly
GCPS Teachers and Administrators View Their Schools Differently Educators Do Not View Teaching and Learning Conditions Similarly

34 Teacher vs. Principal Perceptions of TWC
GCPS North Carolina Domain Average Teachers Principals Time 2.79 4.20 3.06 4.10 Facilities & Resources 3.56 4.43 3.61 4.26 Empowerment 3.21 4.35 3.40 4.31 Leadership 3.36 4.46 3.54 4.47 Professional Development 3.24 3.38 4.00 Teacher vs. Principal Perceptions of TWC

35 Perceptions of GCPS Teachers & Principals
GCPS Agreement on Questions Teachers Principals Teachers are protected from duties that interfere with their role of educating students 34.5 90.5 School leadership tries to minimize the amount of routine administrative paperwork required of teachers 40.4 100 Teachers have access to reliable communication technology, including phones, faxes and 55.1 94.7 Teachers have sufficient access to office equipment, copy machines, paper, etc. 60.0 96.0 Teachers are centrally involved in educational issues 40.5 98.7 Perceptions of GCPS Teachers & Principals

36 Perceptions of GCPS Teachers & Principals
GCPS Agreement on Questions Teachers Principals The faculty has an effective process for making group decisions and solving problems 51.2 100 The school leadership consistently enforces rules for student conduct 43 97.3 The school leadership shields teachers from disruptions, allowing teachers to focus on educating students 46.8 Sufficient funds and resources are available to allow teachers to take advantage of professional development activities 36.4 78.7 Teachers are provided with opportunities to learn from one another 64.5 98.6 Perceptions of GCPS Teachers & Principals

37 Only 13 Percent of Teachers Want to Leave Their School, including 5 percent Want to Leave Teaching
87% of teachers are “stayers” 8% of teachers are “movers” 5% of teachers are “leavers”

38 19 Percent of Teachers Want to Leave Their School, including 6 percent Want to Leave Teaching
81% of teachers are “stayers” 13% of teachers are “movers” 6% of teachers are “leavers”

39 Has it Made a Difference?
Examples of Changes Due to NC TWC

40 State Policies to Improve TWC in NC
Funding for working conditions survey and analysis in the budget and advisory group Funding for PD through Teacher Academy in DSSF, for PEP to create modules – required for all first year principals, and NC Network for integrating in improvement planning process Review of MSA programs to ensure they address recruitment, retention and TWC Principal evaluations to include recruitment, retention and TWC measures Study of use of use of time where more is available for teacher planning and collaboration (39 elementary schools) State Policies to Improve TWC in NC

41 Governor Easley’s Real D.E.A.L. Awards
Schools That Are Great Places to Teach and Learn – 8 Awards Granted and Conference

42 About convening faculty conversations and engaging in school and district improvement planning processes While perceptual data matters, it should be triangulated with other measures Approaches need to be integrated with other policies and programs that enhance teaching quality locally Resources: PEP, NC Network, Teacher Academy TWC PD module; TWC Toolkit online at: Using TWC Data

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45 Your Experience with TWC
Identify Areas of Need; Where to Focus Energy and Resources for Reform around TWC? Recognizing barriers – What Keeps Schools from Addressing and Improving TWC? What are your next steps on TWC? Responding to TWC Data Group Discussion

46 500 Millstone Drive, Suite 102 Hillsborough,NC


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