Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

School Improvement Planning Assessing Teacher Learning Needs.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "School Improvement Planning Assessing Teacher Learning Needs."— Presentation transcript:

1 School Improvement Planning Assessing Teacher Learning Needs

2 Session 1

3 Session 2

4 4

5 School Improvement Planning/SEF LINK Area of Planning Literacy Numeracy Programs and Pathways Community Culture and Caring Category of School Effectiveness Indicator 1.Assessment for, of, and as Learning 2.School and Classroom Leadership 3.Curriculum, Teaching, and Learning 1. Programs and Pathways 1.Student Voice 2.Home School and Community Partnerships

6 Helen Timperley, “Using assessment data for improving, teaching practice”, University of Auckland, New Zealand

7 7 “The only way to increase student achievement is to change classroom practice.” “Principal leadership is second only to classroom practice on impacting student achievement.”

8 The Instructional Core - Elmore Teachers’ Knowledge and Skills Role of the Students Content TASK

9 Three Ways to improve student learning at scale 1.Increase the level of knowledge and skill that the teacher brings to the instructional process. 2.Increase the level of complexity of the content that students are asked to learn. 3.Change the role of the student in the instructional process.

10 “Effective Schools are coherent learning environments for adults and students. Coherence means that adults agree on what they are trying to accomplish with students and that adults are consistent from classroom to classroom in their expectations for what students are expected to learn. Coherent learning environments cannot exist in incoherent organizations” ( Leithwoods concept of Planful Alignment – its all about planning and aligning!) 10

11 Schools &Teachers Make a Difference EnteringAchievement Percentile after TWO Years Average School Average Teacher 50 Highly Ineffective School Highly Ineffective Teacher 503 Highly Effective School Ineffective Teacher 5037 Highly Ineffective School Highly Effective Teacher 5063 Highly Effective School Average Teacher 5078 Highly Effective School Highly Effective Teacher 5096 ²Robert Marzano: What Works in Schools: Translating Research into Action, NSCD, 2001 p. 74 ² 11

12 Aligned Curriculum, Assessments, Instructions and Standards Douglas Reeves – Presentation to the Literacy/Numeracy Secretariat, July, 2007

13 What the Research Says “Classroom instruction is the single greatest predictor of student success - greater than SES, Family background, etc.” Highly effective schools overcome all of the impact of SES and other non-school related factors.” (Schmoker – Results Now) “Most Educators are working, at, or very near, the limit of their existing knowledge and skill.” “You improve schools by using information about student learning, from multiple sources, to find the most promising instructional problems to work on, then systematically develop with teachers and administrators the knowledge and skill necessary to solve those problems – focusing on building a coherent approach across the school.” (Richard Elmore – Instructional Rounds in Education)

14 School Improvement 1.Concrete and specific achievement goals, based on student achievement data, which are continuously monitored. 2.Non-negotiable goals for instruction in every classroom which are: – Consistent across every classroom, decreasing the variability between teachers – Supported by systematic and system wide teacher preparation and professional development 3.Effective Leadership practices – Professional development which supports the development of strong instructional leaders. – Committed leaders who engage the parent and community to support the goals of education

15 Helen Timperley, “Using assessment data for improving, teaching practice”, University of Auckland, New Zealand

16 Session 1

17 SMART Goal Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Results-based, and Time-bound Specify a few SMART learning and achievement goals from the school’s needs assessment and relate the targeted evidence based / actions to the four pillars “By 2012, 90% of students will integrate the reading strategies when responding to reading comprehension tasks and use higher order/ critical thinking skills.” As a result, we will have a 10% increase in the number of students performing at standard on the EQAO. We will also see a 15% increase in the number of exceptional students achieving at standard.

18 “By 2012, 90% of students will integrate the reading strategies when responding to reading comprehension tasks and use higher order/ critical thinking skills.” As a result, we will have a 10% increase in the number of students performing at standard on the EQAO. We will also see a 15% increase in the number of exceptional students achieving at standard. On the basis of the Needs Assessment and Analysis of the DataAND the SMART goal What would our teachers need to learn in order for us to accomplish this goal?

19 Selecting SEF Indicators Review the SEF Indicators that will address the needs identified from the data dialogue – Assessment for, of, and as Learning – School and Classroom Leadership – Curriculum, Teaching, and Learning Review the Evidence for each of the Indicators Once the SEF Indicators are chosen, highlight the evidence that will become the focus of the SEF process. Choose any 4 Indicators from the following Components: 5 Minutes

20 Learning Network Focus From each indicator, identify the examples of evidence which will focus the assessment of practice. 20

21 1.3 Students are taught, and regularly use self-assessment skills to monitor their progress toward achieving learning goals, and to set their own learning goals within the context of the Ontario curriculum and/or Individual Education Plan (IEP) ExemplaryProgressingBeginning I generate learning outcomes based on the Ontario Curriculum and related success criteria which are posted. My students know that learning outcomes and success criteria relate to the instruction of the program but are not using these to self- assess and monitor their progress Learning Outcomes reflect the Ontario Curriculum. Students help to create the success criteria and the exemplars of good work Students can explain the importance of the learning outcomes and are beginning to assess their work on the basis of the success criteria Students refer to the criteria charts and the exemplars to develop their self- assessment skills and set learning goals Students use success criteria as a basis of discussion with peers and/or teachers to reflect on their progress and plan next steps 21

22 Beginning Progressing Beginning By 2012, 90% of students will integrate the reading strategies when responding to reading comprehension tasks and use higher order/ critical thinking skills.” Summary of data Oct 22 Jan 31 Jun 29

23 Monitoring Changed Classroom Practice 1.Critical Friend SEF visit focused ONLY on the identified indicators Protocol developed 2.Daily classroom walk-throughs Comment only on the identified indictors 3.Teacher Growth Plans Promote self-assessment and action research focus. 4. Analysis of impact using Trailing Indicators Its About Student Achievement!

24

25 THIS IS THE REAL WORK “There is no evidence of increased student achievement without changes in classroom practice.” Planning for that work is the beginning of the improvement journey!


Download ppt "School Improvement Planning Assessing Teacher Learning Needs."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google