Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION SKILLS FOR CO-TEACHERS IN INCLUSION CLASSROOMS NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF SPECIAL EDUCATION TEACHERS.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION SKILLS FOR CO-TEACHERS IN INCLUSION CLASSROOMS NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF SPECIAL EDUCATION TEACHERS."— Presentation transcript:

1 EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION SKILLS FOR CO-TEACHERS IN INCLUSION CLASSROOMS NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF SPECIAL EDUCATION TEACHERS

2 Overview of Presentation The first section of our presentation will focus on three areas: The first section of our presentation will focus on three areas: Characteristics of Effective Interpersonal Feedback in Inclusion Classrooms Characteristics of Effective Interpersonal Feedback in Inclusion Classrooms Co-Teaching Communication Conflicts Co-Teaching Communication Conflicts Personality Styles that Create Conflict Between Co-Teachers Personality Styles that Create Conflict Between Co-Teachers

3 Characteristics of Effective Interpersonal Feedback in Inclusion Classrooms It is obvious to say that if you have poor interpersonal communications skills (which includes active listening), your ability to co-teach will suffer It is obvious to say that if you have poor interpersonal communications skills (which includes active listening), your ability to co-teach will suffer Lines of communications must be open between people who rely on one another to get work done. Lines of communications must be open between people who rely on one another to get work done.

4 Characteristics of Effective Interpersonal Feedback in Inclusion Classrooms Considering this, co-teachers must be able to both give and receive feedback if they are to perform to expectations, avoid conflicts and misunderstandings, and ultimately succeed in and outside of the classroom Considering this, co-teachers must be able to both give and receive feedback if they are to perform to expectations, avoid conflicts and misunderstandings, and ultimately succeed in and outside of the classroom

5 Characteristics of Effective Interpersonal Feedback in Inclusion Classrooms Knowing your own preferred way to receive feedback from your colleagues is a significant first step in determining how you and your co- teacher will give each other feedback about your activities in a shared classroom Knowing your own preferred way to receive feedback from your colleagues is a significant first step in determining how you and your co- teacher will give each other feedback about your activities in a shared classroom

6 Characteristics of Effective Interpersonal Feedback in Inclusion Classrooms To collaborate successfully with other teachers and administrators in the co- teaching process, you will need to be adept at giving effective feedback. To collaborate successfully with other teachers and administrators in the co- teaching process, you will need to be adept at giving effective feedback. You will also want to learn to solicit and accept feedback from others as a means of securing valuable information about your own communication behaviors and about your collaborative relationships You will also want to learn to solicit and accept feedback from others as a means of securing valuable information about your own communication behaviors and about your collaborative relationships

7 Characteristics of Effective Interpersonal Feedback in Inclusion Classrooms Feedback has a clear set of characteristics. It should be: Feedback has a clear set of characteristics. It should be:DescriptiveSpecific Directed toward changeable behaviors and situations Well-timedDirectSolicitedConcise Any feedback statement includes ALL of these characteristics Any feedback statement includes ALL of these characteristics

8 When Giving Feedback to Your Co-Teacher, be Descriptive Rather than Evaluative or Advisory An individual is more likely to listen when someone simply describes what has been observed An individual is more likely to listen when someone simply describes what has been observed Descriptive information is nonthreatening and nonjudgmental Descriptive information is nonthreatening and nonjudgmental

9 When Giving Feedback to Your Co-Teacher, be Descriptive Rather than Evaluative or Advisory Say: “I noticed that you raised your voice” or “I noticed that when Billy approached you, you immediately told him to sit down and didn’t listen to what he was going to tell you” Say: “I noticed that you raised your voice” or “I noticed that when Billy approached you, you immediately told him to sit down and didn’t listen to what he was going to tell you” Rather than: Rather than: You talk too loud all the time…or You talk too loud all the time…or “You shouldn’t yell”….or “You shouldn’t yell”….or “Have you tried keeping a calm voice?”…or “Have you tried keeping a calm voice?”…or “You didn’t do that very well” “You didn’t do that very well” “Your system makes no sense” “Your system makes no sense” These comments are likely to cause the person to feel defensive and criticized rather than willing to make a change These comments are likely to cause the person to feel defensive and criticized rather than willing to make a change

10 When Giving Feedback to Your Co-Teacher, the Feedback Should be Specific Rather than General “ You sounded angry ” communicates much less than “ You sounded angry ” communicates much less than “ I noticed that every time you spoke you frowned and raised your voice ” “ I noticed that every time you spoke you frowned and raised your voice ”

11 When Giving Feedback to Your Co-Teacher, the Feedback Should be Directed Toward Behavior or a Situation that He/She Can Change In order for feedback to be useful, it needs to be directed at something that the receiver can control or do something about In order for feedback to be useful, it needs to be directed at something that the receiver can control or do something about Feedback directed toward an attribute or situation the receiver cannot control is generally pointless and likely to interfere with effective communication Feedback directed toward an attribute or situation the receiver cannot control is generally pointless and likely to interfere with effective communication

12 When Giving Feedback to Your Co-Teacher, the Feedback Should be Directed Toward Behavior or a Situation that He/She Can Change Physical traits such as height, sex, age, or sex and situational aspects such as the size of the room or the administrator’s leadership style are not behaviors that an individual can change Physical traits such as height, sex, age, or sex and situational aspects such as the size of the room or the administrator’s leadership style are not behaviors that an individual can change

13 When Giving Feedback to Your Co-Teacher, the Feedback Should be Well- Timed Corrective feedback is most beneficial to learners when it is given immediately following the relevant event or behavior Corrective feedback is most beneficial to learners when it is given immediately following the relevant event or behavior You should always ask yourself “Is now the best time to give my co-teacher feedback?” You should always ask yourself “Is now the best time to give my co-teacher feedback?” If your co-teacher is extremely busy or rushed, the feedback may be an irritating intrusion If your co-teacher is extremely busy or rushed, the feedback may be an irritating intrusion

14 When Giving Feedback to Your Co-Teacher, the Feedback Should be Well-Timed Or if some event has left your colleague upset and confused, immediate feedback may be seen as unduly demanding or even critical Or if some event has left your colleague upset and confused, immediate feedback may be seen as unduly demanding or even critical It’s recommended that you provide feedback as soon as is “appropriate”, not only so that it is recent but also so that it demonstrates your sensitivity to your co-teacher’s receptiveness It’s recommended that you provide feedback as soon as is “appropriate”, not only so that it is recent but also so that it demonstrates your sensitivity to your co-teacher’s receptiveness

15 When Giving Feedback to Your Co-Teacher, the Feedback Should be Well-Timed Some prefer to hear their co-teacher’s reaction to a co-taught lesson immediately upon its completion Some prefer to hear their co-teacher’s reaction to a co-taught lesson immediately upon its completion Others are more receptive if they have a break for an hour or as much as a day before “debriefing” with their partners Others are more receptive if they have a break for an hour or as much as a day before “debriefing” with their partners As important as “how” teachers give each other feedback is “when” they do so As important as “how” teachers give each other feedback is “when” they do so

16 When Giving Feedback to Your Co-Teacher, the Feedback Should be Direct Rather than Indirect Feedback is most effective when it is given directly to the person who can use it by the person who has made some observation Feedback is most effective when it is given directly to the person who can use it by the person who has made some observation For example, instead of asking the principal to tell your co-teacher about ineffective teaching behavior, generally you should tell him or her personally For example, instead of asking the principal to tell your co-teacher about ineffective teaching behavior, generally you should tell him or her personally

17 When Giving Feedback to Your Co-Teacher, the Feedback Should be Direct Rather than Indirect Note writing can also be misinterpreted and can decrease the effectiveness of feedback Note writing can also be misinterpreted and can decrease the effectiveness of feedback This is because the giver cannot check the feedback for accuracy and the receiver cannot adequately clarify it This is because the giver cannot check the feedback for accuracy and the receiver cannot adequately clarify it

18 When Giving Feedback to Your Co-Teacher, Ideally, the Feedback Should be Solicited Feedback, like advice and explanations, is most effective when someone has requested it Feedback, like advice and explanations, is most effective when someone has requested it Unsolicited feedback may make the receiver feel defensive and assume a “Who asked you” attitude Unsolicited feedback may make the receiver feel defensive and assume a “Who asked you” attitude When you work with your colleague, you should not assume that your colleague actually wants feedback. When you work with your colleague, you should not assume that your colleague actually wants feedback. You and your co-teacher need to discuss this issue on when feedback should be given You and your co-teacher need to discuss this issue on when feedback should be given

19 When Giving Feedback to Your Co-Teacher, the Feedback Should be Concise Concise feedback is easier to understand than feedback that contains extraneous detail or information Concise feedback is easier to understand than feedback that contains extraneous detail or information

20 When Giving Feedback to Your Co-Teacher, the Feedback Should be Concise “In terms of your language, I mean the words you uses, you used complex and technical words that I didn’t understand. The vocabulary you used was too specialized for me to understand. I didn’t know what all your vocabulary meant so I didn’t understand your main points. Everything has to be explained well or I get really disturbed and close out everything you say.” “In terms of your language, I mean the words you uses, you used complex and technical words that I didn’t understand. The vocabulary you used was too specialized for me to understand. I didn’t know what all your vocabulary meant so I didn’t understand your main points. Everything has to be explained well or I get really disturbed and close out everything you say.”

21 When Giving Feedback to Your Co-Teacher, the Feedback Should be Concise “When you used technical terms I got lost. It would help me out a lot if you would define your terms and make your point again.” “When you used technical terms I got lost. It would help me out a lot if you would define your terms and make your point again.”

22 Questions to Ask Before You Give Feedback to Your Co-Teacher In general, when giving feedback to your co-teacher, ask yourself these questions: In general, when giving feedback to your co-teacher, ask yourself these questions: Will this person understand me? Will this person be able to accept my feedback? Will this person be able to use the information? What is the best way to give my co-teacher feedback? What is the best way to ensure that both positive and negative issues are raised? Remember: Feedback should include not only highlighting those aspects of instruction that are especially successful and satisfying, but also planning alternatives to less successful and satisfying aspects Remember: Feedback should include not only highlighting those aspects of instruction that are especially successful and satisfying, but also planning alternatives to less successful and satisfying aspects

23 Co-Teaching Communication Conflicts The following have been reported in the research as the most often cited problems regarding feedback and communication between co-teachers: The following have been reported in the research as the most often cited problems regarding feedback and communication between co-teachers: Philosophy and Beliefs Parity Signals Classroom Routines DisciplineNoise Pet Peeves

24 Communication About Philosophy and Beliefs Understanding each other’s general instructional beliefs, especially those that affect decisions about instruction, is essential to a strong co- teaching relationship Understanding each other’s general instructional beliefs, especially those that affect decisions about instruction, is essential to a strong co- teaching relationship Question to ask: How do our instructional beliefs affect our instructional practice? Question to ask: How do our instructional beliefs affect our instructional practice?

25 Communication About Parity Signals The nature of co-teaching relationship requires that co-teachers have parity and recognize it The nature of co-teaching relationship requires that co-teachers have parity and recognize it Questions to ask: Questions to ask: How will we convey to students that we are equals in the classroom How will we convey to students that we are equals in the classroom How can we ensure a sense of parity during instruction How can we ensure a sense of parity during instruction

26 Examples of Parity Signals Both teachers names on the board or in the printed course schedule Both teachers names on the board or in the printed course schedule Both teachers’ signatures on correspondence to parents Both teachers’ signatures on correspondence to parents Includes participation in teaching, grading assignments, and assigning report card grades Includes participation in teaching, grading assignments, and assigning report card grades Remember-Co-teaching is about partnership Remember-Co-teaching is about partnership

27 Communication About Classroom Routines Experienced teachers all have preferred classroom routines Experienced teachers all have preferred classroom routines These include organizational routines and instructional routines These include organizational routines and instructional routines Teachers are rarely aware of how many routines they have Teachers are rarely aware of how many routines they have Remember-It’s not so important as to whose routines get adopted but the co-teachers, but it is important that both teachers know what the routines will be so that they can consistently communicate them to students Remember-It’s not so important as to whose routines get adopted but the co-teachers, but it is important that both teachers know what the routines will be so that they can consistently communicate them to students

28 Communication About Classroom routines Questions to ask: Questions to ask: What are the instructional routines for the classroom? What are the instructional routines for the classroom? What are the organizational routines for the classroom? What are the organizational routines for the classroom?

29 Communication About Discipline What each teacher believes is acceptable behavior and what each views as appropriate responses to unacceptable student behavior should be discussed and “negotiated” What each teacher believes is acceptable behavior and what each views as appropriate responses to unacceptable student behavior should be discussed and “negotiated” Questions to ask: Questions to ask: What is considered acceptable and unacceptable student behavior? What is considered acceptable and unacceptable student behavior? Who is to intervene at what point in students’ behavior? Who is to intervene at what point in students’ behavior? What are the rewards and consequences used in the classroom? What are the rewards and consequences used in the classroom?

30 Communication About Noise Teachers differ significantly in their tolerance for noise as they do in preferences for discipline strategies or classroom routines Teachers differ significantly in their tolerance for noise as they do in preferences for discipline strategies or classroom routines Noise includes teacher talk as well as student generated noise Noise includes teacher talk as well as student generated noise Question to ask: What noise level are we comfortable with in the classroom? Question to ask: What noise level are we comfortable with in the classroom?

31 Communication About Pet Peeves All teachers have a few issues that are especially important to them, or more likely, that bother them a great deal All teachers have a few issues that are especially important to them, or more likely, that bother them a great deal Pet peeves are specific triggers that could put relationships in jeopardy Pet peeves are specific triggers that could put relationships in jeopardy For some, it could be interruption during instruction, while for others it may be the removal of supplies from their desks or failure to put materials away For some, it could be interruption during instruction, while for others it may be the removal of supplies from their desks or failure to put materials away

32 Communication About Pet Peeves Some co-teachers do not permit students to return to their lockers after they have come to class Some co-teachers do not permit students to return to their lockers after they have come to class Some are very particular in how grades are recorded in the grade book Some are very particular in how grades are recorded in the grade book Pet peeves can be about student issues, classroom arrangements or materials, or adult issues Pet peeves can be about student issues, classroom arrangements or materials, or adult issues

33 Communication About Pet Peeves Questions to ask: Questions to ask: What aspect of teaching and classroom life does each of us feel strongly about What aspect of teaching and classroom life does each of us feel strongly about How can we identify our pet peeves so as to avoid them? How can we identify our pet peeves so as to avoid them?

34 Personality Styles that Create Conflict between Co-Teachers Blocking Blocking Being negative and stubbornly resistant Disagreeing and opposing without or beyond "reason" Attempting to maintain or bring back an issue, direction, or task after it has been rejected or bypassed Being negative and stubbornly resistant Disagreeing and opposing without or beyond "reason" Attempting to maintain or bring back an issue, direction, or task after it has been rejected or bypassed

35 Personality Styles that Create Conflict between Co-Teachers Attacking: Attacking: Deflating the status of others Expressing disapproval of the values, acts, or feelings of others Attacking the team, the leader or the problem being worked on Joking aggressively Trying to take credit for another's contribution Deflating the status of others Expressing disapproval of the values, acts, or feelings of others Attacking the team, the leader or the problem being worked on Joking aggressively Trying to take credit for another's contribution

36 Personality Styles that Create Conflict between Co-Teachers Being Playful: Being Playful: Displaying lack of involvement in the team's efforts by cynicism, nonchalance, horseplay Displaying lack of involvement in the team's efforts by cynicism, nonchalance, horseplay

37 Personality Styles that Create Conflict between Co-Teachers Seeking Recognition: Seeking Recognition: Boasting, reporting on personal achievements Acting in unusual ways Struggling to prevent being placed in an "inferior" position Boasting, reporting on personal achievements Acting in unusual ways Struggling to prevent being placed in an "inferior" position

38 Personality Styles that Create Conflict between Co-Teachers Deserting: Deserting: Withdrawing in some way Being indifferent, silent, aloof, excessively formal, day dreaming Deliberately doing tasks that are unrelated to team's functions and goals (i.e., grading papers, knitting) Withdrawing in some way Being indifferent, silent, aloof, excessively formal, day dreaming Deliberately doing tasks that are unrelated to team's functions and goals (i.e., grading papers, knitting)

39 Personality Styles that Create Conflict between Co-Teachers Dominating: Dominating: Asserting power or superiority to manipulate the team or certain members of the team by flattery Asserting power or superiority to manipulate the team or certain members of the team by flattery Asserting a superior status or right to attention Asserting a superior status or right to attention Giving directions autocratically Interrupting the contributions of others Giving directions autocratically Interrupting the contributions of others


Download ppt "EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION SKILLS FOR CO-TEACHERS IN INCLUSION CLASSROOMS NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF SPECIAL EDUCATION TEACHERS."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google