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Recruiting and Retaining AP Teaching Talent By: Jillian M. Sansivero, MA AP Language and Literature Teacher Dallas, TX.

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Presentation on theme: "Recruiting and Retaining AP Teaching Talent By: Jillian M. Sansivero, MA AP Language and Literature Teacher Dallas, TX."— Presentation transcript:

1 Recruiting and Retaining AP Teaching Talent By: Jillian M. Sansivero, MA AP Language and Literature Teacher Dallas, TX

2 What brings you to this session today?

3 Recruiting and Cultivating AP Talent

4 First Things First: Determine the qualities that you would like to see an AP teacher.

5 Things that are traditionally valued: 1. Master Teacher-an expert 2. Someone with many years of experience 3. Someone with connections to an administrator 4. A “tough” teacher

6 Well---- What is really important???

7 Are tenured teachers the best choice? Not necessarily. 1. With tenure comes comfort. 2. With comfort comes a tendency to not want to change. 3. Why should I focus on results if I am safe in this department? 4. So I lose AP; it is more work anyways.

8 Just because someone has been there forever, it does not mean that they are the most qualified.

9 Younger teachers could help your program more than you think. -They want to impress their administrators. -They come to you with the newest techniques from their degree programs. -They will work for less money. -They have more time to dedicate.

10 Hook them early and you can: 1. Mold them into what you want 2. Offer them lots of PD 3. Give them incentives They will stick with you!

11 Younger or “More Seasoned” Choose Teachers Who: 1. Are creative and innovative 2. Are not high maintenance; you have other things to do. 3. Come from high quality universities 4. Have shown you that they can build strong relationships with kids 5. Are “tough” and can motivate kids.

12 When we talk AP, aren’t we also talking about a program that depends on results? Passing the test means college credit.

13 Teachers that get results should be rewarded. Your students are the benefactors. Aren’t they the ones who matter most?

14 My Research I surveyed 50 high school teachers (AP and non- AP) from across the country to find out what would motivate them to take an AP position or to stay in an AP position.

15 You might be shocked....

16 The Research Pool: 50% Regular HS Teachers 17% Pre-AP/Honors Teachers 33% Current or Former AP teachers

17 All teachers listed the following deterrents: 1. Increased Prep Time: 42% 2. Grading Load: 58% 3. Lack of Recognition: 16%

18 Regular High School Teachers

19 Question 1: If you were approached by an administrator and asked to teach an AP course in your discipline for next year how likely would be to do it? (If you had a choice to do it or not) 50% said “very likely” 33% said “likely” 17% said “not likely”

20 Question 2: Which of the following incentives would influence you?

21 “Very likely” teachers wanted: 1. A stipend: 66% (50% $1,000+) (50% $250-$500) 2. Extra planning/conference period:66% 3. Mentoring from other AP teachers: 66% 4. Paid for PD through the CB: 33% 5. Plaque/Certificate/Parking Spot: 16%

22 100% of “Likely” teachers wanted: 1. A stipend($250-$500) 2. Extra planning/conference period 3. Mentoring from other AP teachers

23 “Not likely” teachers wanted: 1. A stipend: 50% ($500-1,000) 2. Extra planning/conference period: 100% 3. Mentoring from other AP teachers: 100% 4. Paid for PD through the CB: 50% 5. Plaque/Certificate/Parking Spot: 0%

24 Question 3: How important would it be for you to receive mentoring from a seasoned AP teacher? 50% said “Very Important” 50% said “Slightly important”

25 Question 4: If you were required to be mentored as a new AP teacher, which would you like to have input on? 1. Frequency of meetings: 50% 2. Agenda for meetings: 33% 3. Teaching style of mentor: 100% 4. Personality of mentor: 60%

26 Question 5: To what degree would PD opportunities attract you to the AP program? Very likely: 80% Indifferent: 20%

27 Question 6: What types of PD would you like to participate in? 1. Online Workshops by CB: 40% 2. In person CB workshops: 80% 3. Retreats with other AP teachers: 20% 4. Annual AP Summer Conferences: 0% 5. AP Training at local colleges: 60%

28 Question 7: How important is camaraderie among AP teachers to you? Very Important: 20% Somewhat Important: 40% Indifferent: 40% Not Important: 0%

29 Pre-AP/Honors Teachers

30 Question 1: If you were approached by an administrator and asked to teach an AP course in your discipline for next year how likely would be to do it? (If you had a choice to do it or not) 100% said “likely”

31 Question 2: Which of the following incentives would influence you?

32 Pre-AP/Honors teachers wanted: 1. A stipend: 66% (33% $1,000+) (33% $250-$500) 2. Extra planning/conference period:66% 3. Mentoring from other AP teachers: 33% 4. Paid for PD through the CB: 66% 5. Plaque/Certificate/Parking Spot: 33% 6. Appreciation Breakfasts: 66% 7. Selection of Roster: 33%

33 Question 3: How important would it be for you to receive mentoring from a seasoned AP teacher? 33% said “Indifferent” 66% said “Slightly important”

34 Question 4: If you were required to be mentored as a new AP teacher, which would you like to have input on? 1. Frequency of meetings: 66% 2. Agenda for meetings: 0% 3. Teaching style of mentor: 66% 4. Personality of mentor: 66%

35 Question 5: To what degree would PD opportunities attract you to the AP program? Very likely: 33% Indifferent: 66%

36 Question 6: What types of PD would you like to participate in? 1. Online Workshops by CB: 33% 2. In person CB workshops: 0% 3. Retreats with other AP teachers: 33% 4. Annual AP Summer Conferences: 66% 5. AP Training at local colleges: 66%

37 Question 7: How important is camaraderie among AP teachers to you? Very Important: 0% Somewhat Important: 33% Indifferent: 66% Not Important: 0%

38 Mentoring: The Key to Cultivation

39 A Look at Mentoring: Protocol Questions for Data Collection (Cook Study 2012)

40 1. Were you provided with a mentor when you began your teaching position? 78.5% reported receiving some sort of mentoring. 21% reported receiving no mentoring. 40

41 2. Did you have any input regarding the selection of your mentor? 100% of teachers who received mentoring reported having no input regarding the selection of their respective mentor. 41

42 3. What was the title of your mentor? 82.4% reported “Teacher” 4.1% reported “Administrator” 13.5% reported “Other” 42

43 4. Was your mentor familiar with your content area? 84.9% reported “YES” 15.1% reported “NO” 43

44 5. Did you have any input with your mentor regarding the agenda of your meetings? 56.2% reported “YES” 43.8% reported “NO” 44

45 6. Did you have any input with your mentor regarding the frequency of your meetings? 45.2% reported “YES” 54.8% reported “NO” 45

46 7. How many times per month did you receive mentoring? 42.5% reported once monthly 23.3% reported twice monthly 6.8% reported three times monthly 27.4% reported more than three times monthly 46

47 8. How long did you receive mentoring for? 60.3% reported only 1 year 34.2% reported 2 years 2.7% reported 3 years 2.7% reported more than 3 years 47

48 9. Were you satisfied with your mentoring experience? 64.4% reported “YES.” 35.6% reported “NO.” 48

49 Satisfied teachers said: “I could not have made it without her support and encouragement.” “My mentor was attentive to my needs.” “I had the support of the entire cluster.” “She was open to freely give me support that would build my lessons in the classroom.” 49

50 “My mentor was a master teacher in my content area.” “I was assigned a mentor who visited frequently and offered suggestions.” “My mentor and I had the same planning period and we taught 2 different sections of the same class.” “My mentor was approachable and very helpful.” 50

51 Dissatisfied teachers said: “My mentoring experience was very unstructured.” “I did not receive the needed teaching support.” “My mentor was from a different campus with a different schedule.” “I taught 10th grade world history and my mentor was a kindergarten teacher.” 51

52 “We never met for guidance and feedback.” “My mentor was not familiar with my subject area.” “We had little chemistry and our teaching styles were very different.” “My mentor was assigned to me and did not want to be a mentor.” 52

53 Some of these things are logistically out of an administrator’s control but the following should always be met:

54 Every teacher should receive a mentor when they are put in a new teaching position. No one can do it alone; there are many different things to adjust to. Emotional and professional support are paramount.

55 Every teacher should have input regarding the selection of their mentor. Seeing a new perspective can be good, but the new teacher’s particular needs and style need to be at the forefront. Contrasting teaching styles can be jarring and might be better for the 2nd year of mentoring.

56 Ways to give new teachers input: 1. Have all of your new teachers and new mentors complete a personality test. 2. Have new teachers make a list of qualities that they hope for in a mentor. 3. Have mentors make a list of things that they think are important to cover with their new teacher.

57 Every new teacher should be mentored by a teacher. Although having a strong relationship with your administrators is important, they should not be the primary mentor. New teachers need someone they can “vent to” and share their teaching experiences with.

58 Both mentor and new teacher should work together to set the agenda.

59 Every new teacher must receive a mentor who is a master teacher in their content. New teachers need lesson planning support and thus need to be placed with someone who understands the standards and expectations set forth by the department and academic discipline.

60 Maintaining Your AP Talent: What Your Current AP Teachers Want

61 Which of the following incentives would influence your decision to stay in the AP program?

62 “Very likely” teachers wanted: 1. A stipend: 0% 2. Extra planning/conference period: 33% 3. Mentoring from other AP teachers:33% 4. Paid for PD through the CB:100% 5. Plaque/Certificate/Parking Spot: 33% 6. Recognition Breakfasts: 100%

63 How important would it be for you to receive mentoring from a seasoned AP teacher? 100% said “Slightly important”

64 To what degree would PD opportunities attract you to the AP program? Very likely: 100%

65 What types of PD would you like to participate in? 1. Online Workshops by CB: 100% 2. In person CB workshops: 100% 3. Retreats with other AP teachers: 100% 4. Annual AP Summer Conferences: 100% 5. AP Training at local colleges: 100%

66 How important is camaraderie among AP teachers to you? Very Important: 66% Somewhat Important: 33%

67 You have them....

68 Ways to Keep Them 1. Offer mentoring 2. Use incentives (we’ll talk about this later) 3. Pay for your teachers to go to Professional Development Workshops 4. Give them extra time to plan and grade

69 We live in a capitalist society. Even though teachers often do things from the “goodness” in their hearts....

70 You’ll get even better results by PAYING THEM APPROPRIATELY and treating them like GOLD

71 We know that: All teachers like to feel appreciated and valued by their administrators. Teachers tend to be proud of each other’s accomplishments. Teachers value hard work and accomplishments.

72 What current perks do you have in place for your Advanced Placement teachers?

73 Contrary to what students think, teachers are real people with real lives!

74 AP Teachers are more likely to Spend those extra hours grading at night -Be in a better mood -Spend more time creating new, more exciting lessons -Attend a professional development workshop on a weekend -Tutor more after school -Review best practices

75 If they can now afford to: -Have a date night -Save for a vacation -Buy things for their children -Get a manicure/pedicure -Enjoy a nice glass of wine

76 All it might take is: -A gift card -A plaque -An appreciation meal -Thank you cards -A small bonus around the holidays -Chocolate and wine!

77 Questions & Answers


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