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FACILITATORS: Kathryn Curry Erica Hilliker Collaboration and Co-Teaching Strategies Adapted from Co-Teaching that Works: Ideas for School Administrators.

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Presentation on theme: "FACILITATORS: Kathryn Curry Erica Hilliker Collaboration and Co-Teaching Strategies Adapted from Co-Teaching that Works: Ideas for School Administrators."— Presentation transcript:

1 FACILITATORS: Kathryn Curry Erica Hilliker Collaboration and Co-Teaching Strategies Adapted from Co-Teaching that Works: Ideas for School Administrators and Teachers, A. Beninghof, 2010, Muskegon ISD

2 Objectives We will identify and discuss different collaborative practices and co-teaching models. We will plan ways to integrate collaborative practices and co-teaching into our instructional repertoire in order to improve student access and outcomes.

3 Agenda Activator- I SEE Strategy Co-Teaching Models Building Collaborative Relationships Summarizer- Tickets Out

4 Activator “I See” Strategy I= Illustrate. What does co-teaching look like? What images come to mind? S= State in one simple sentence what it is. Use your own words. E= Elaborate on what you have just stated. E= Examples. Add examples from your own practice.

5 What is co-teaching? Two or more adults Simultaneously instructing a heterogeneous group of students In a coordinated fashion “ Collaborative teaching is a service delivery structure in which teachers with different knowledge, skills, and talents have joint responsibility for designing, delivering, monitoring, and evaluating instruction for a diverse group of learners in general education classrooms” (DeBoer & Fister, 1995).

6 Co-Teaching is not… One teacher acting like a helper Just “showing up” Ignoring the needs of ELL students or students with IEPs Teaching the same old way Failing to assist ANY student in need

7 The Components of Co-Teaching CO-TEACHING COMPONENTS INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT FAMILIARITY WITH THE CURRICULUM INSTRUCTIONAL PLANNING INSTRUCTIONASSESSMENT TEACHING PHILOSOPHY BELIEFS CURRICULUM GOALS Gately, S., Gately, F., Understanding Co-teaching Components, Journal of Teaching Exceptional Children, 2 (3) 41-47

8 Stages of Co-Teacher Development Beginning Stage Compromising Stage Collaborative Stage Gately, S., Gately, F., Understanding Co-teaching Components, Journal of Teaching Exceptional Children, 2 (3) Teachers often present separate lessons One teacher is “boss”; one is “helper” Both teachers direct some of the activities in the classroom. Special educators offers mini- lessons or clarifies strategies that students may use. Both teachers participate in the presentation of the lesson, provide instruction and structure the learning activities The “chalk” passes freely Students address questions and discuss concerns with both teachers

9 Co-Teaching Models: Lead and Support Duet Speak and Add/Chart Skills Group Station Teaching Learning Style Parallel Teaching Adapting Complementary Instruction

10 Lead and Support What it is… Teacher A primary responsibility is planning a unit of instruction Teacher B shares in delivery, monitoring, and evaluation

11 Lesson Plan- Lead & Support Model Standard: Read and understand a variety of non-fiction. Objective: Increase Comprehension through comparison and contrast ActivitySupports McGraw Hill pp Read silently Answer questions on p. 382 in pairs Develop and complete graphic organizer with teacher lesson. Post It Notes Page covers (“magic”) Highlighter tape Colored acetate strips Partially completed graphic organizers Adapted assessment at end of unit.

12 Duet Model What it is… Teacher A Both teachers plan and design Teacher Binstruction. Teachers take turns delivering various components of the lesson.

13 Speak and Add/Chart Model What it is… Teacher A primarily responsible for designing and delivering Teacher B adds and expands with questions, rephrasing, anecdotes; recording key information on charts, transparencies, or board.

14 Lesson Plan- Speak & Add/Chart Model Standard: Read a variety of literary forms- describe character development in fiction. Objective: Find similarities and differences among the 2 main characters of the novel. SpeakAdd/Chart Initiation: Begin with hula hoops Body: Review meanings of “similarities” Guided brainstorming Higher order questions Closure: Students pair share Venn diagram on overhead transparency Paper copies for students Hula Hoops (3) Wikki Stix Both teachers wander

15 Skills Group Model What it is… Teacher A Students are divided into 2-4 groups Teacher B based on instructional level. Each teacher takes primary responsibility for planning for one or two groups. Instruction may take place in small groups or whole group with differentiated levels.

16 Lesson Plan- Skills Group Model Standard: Writing- Student will write stories and simple explanations. Objective: Write an organized paragraph for a multi-step process. ActivityTeacher HighAdd dialogue between leprechaun and “hunter” X AverageWorksheet graphic organizer 1,2,3 on left margin X LowHop-step curtain with graphic organizer, then worksheets Puff paint on worksheets for the 1,2,3 in green, yellow, red X OtherHop-step curtain Sticky labels for vocabulary extenders X

17 Station Teaching Model What it is… Teacher A responsible for overall instruction Teacher B teaches a small group specific skills they have not mastered

18 Learning Style Model What it is… Teacher A Both teachers share in the design and Teacher B delivery of instruction. One teacher is primarily responsible for auditory and visual instruction, the other for tactile and kinesthetic instruction.

19 Parallel Teaching Model What it is… Teacher A Both teachers plan and design. The Teacher B class splits into two groups. Each teacher takes a group for the entire lesson.

20 Adapting Model What it is… Teacher A primarily responsible for planning and delivering a unit of instruction Teacher B determines and provides adaptations for students who are struggling

21 Complementary Instruction Model What it is… Teacher A primarily responsible for delivering core content Teacher B primarily responsible for delivering related instruction in the areas of study and survival skills

22 Model Type:AdvantagesChallengesWhen would it work best? Lead and Support Model Duet Model Speak and Add/Chart Model Skills Group Model Station Teaching Model Learning Style Model Parallel Teaching Model Adapting Model Complementary Instruction Model

23 Collaborative Relationships Think about the successful collaborative relationships you have had in your life -- both personal and professional.  What has made these relationships successful? Jot down key words  Walk about: Give one, get one What makes collaborative partnerships work?

24 Roles and Responsibilities of Collaborative Teachers The leader The supporter The techie The scribe The illustrator The evaluator Other roles

25 Getting Started Review the elements of collaboration Identify personality strengths and weaknesses, areas of expertise, learning styles, teaching styles and what you can bring to the relationship Identify your values and beliefs on classroom management, motivating students, what is fair, assessment, grading, instructional strategies (‘more is more’) Decide on the best times for meeting and planning for everyone involved

26 Compare and Contrast: Collaborative Teaching Roles and Responsibilities Consider each teacher’s role: Who will be responsible for: Name:

27 Protocol for Collaborative Professional Conversations on Co-teachin g Co-teachers set aside 20 minutes for this activity. They agree to a set of accepted parameters for this professional conversation. One co-teacher offers his or her account of successful aspects of the shared co-teaching experience. The other co-teacher is silent and takes notes. (3 minutes) The same step is repeated with the second co-teacher. (3 minutes) Each teacher takes a turn to clarify one key element in the other’s presentation. (3 minutes total) Co-teachers start an open discussion to analyze the reasons for their successes and/or identify any other contributing factors that hindered the success. (8 minutes) The session is concluded with each co-teacher reflecting on the conversation and identifying one specific goal or step for the future. (3 minutes) Adapted from Easton, L. B. (February/March 2009). Protocols: A facilitator’s best friend. Tools for Schools, 12 (3). p. 6.

28 Powerful Questions to Try: What do you want from your co-teaching partnership? Try to envision success. Can you describe it? What will you have to do to achieve this? What stops you? What options do you have? What other options are there? How will you or others know when it’s worked? What would it look like to your students? What would your students be doing differently? What’s next?

29 Objectives We will identify and discuss different collaborative practices and co-teaching models. We will plan ways to integrate collaborative practices and co-teaching into our instructional repertoire in order to improve student access and outcomes.

30 Summarizer I think… I feel… I wonder…


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