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Referencing Bibliography Layout Text Sources Bibliography Layout Online Sources In-text citations HELP Hit ‘Esc’ to get back to Moodle.

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Presentation on theme: "Referencing Bibliography Layout Text Sources Bibliography Layout Online Sources In-text citations HELP Hit ‘Esc’ to get back to Moodle."— Presentation transcript:

1 Referencing Bibliography Layout Text Sources Bibliography Layout Online Sources In-text citations HELP Hit ‘Esc’ to get back to Moodle

2 Bibliography Layout – Text Sources Calderdale College (2010) The Rough Guide for students 2010/11. Halifax: Calderdale College. Dutton, S. (2010) The Biennial’s radical heart. a-n Magazine, December 2010, p6. Light, G., Cox, R. & Calkins, S. (2009) Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: The Reflective Professional. (2 nd Ed) London: Sage. Schofield, H., Bloch, S., Herrman, H., Murphy, B., Nankerivs, J. & Singh, B. (Eds) (1998) family caregivers: disability, illness and ageing. St. Leonards, Australia: Allen & Unwin. HOME

3 Bibliography Layout – Online Sources Public Health Agency (2010a) Inequalities in health and wellbeing: working together for change - Obesity. [online booklet] Public Health Agency. Available at: df [Accessed on: 16/12/2010] Public Health Agency (2010b) Inequalities in health and wellbeing: working together for change - Reducing smoking in pregnancy. [online booklet] Public Health Agency. Available at: g%20Smoking%20in%20Pregnancy.pdf [Accessed on: 16/12/2010] Barker, R., Gledhill, A. & Lydon, C. (2007) BTEC National Sport Book 1. (2 nd Ed) [e-Book] Pearson Education Limited. Available at: [Accessed on: 16/12/2010]

4 Schofield, H., Bloch, S., Herrman, H., Murphy, B., Nankerivs, J. & Singh, B. (Eds) Where there is a long list of authors – or in this case, Editors (Eds) – you need to name them ALL in your Bibliography. They ALL deserve credit for the publication. HOWEVER: In your text, you only need to write the first author’s name and et al. Example: (Schofield et al, 1998) Three or more They are written in the same order they appear on the publication BACK For more on in-text citations CLICK HERE

5 Calderdale College Where there is no named author for a publication you need to use the name of the organisation. Such as: Within the booklet The Rough Guide for Students 2010/11 nobody is credited with having written the text, so the credit goes to the organisation, which in this case is the college. In your text this will appear as: (Calderdale College, 2010) BACK No Named Author

6 ARTICLE The named publication should always be in italics, underlined or bold. The publications we have listed in our Sample Bibliography are: The Rough Guide for students 2010/11 a-n Magazine Reflective practice in the early years family caregivers: disability, illness and ageing Notice that lower and uppercase letters have been used EXACTLY as they appear on the publication The Exception: The information which is NOT in italics: The Biennial’s radical heart. It is the title of the ARTICLE within the MAGAZINE or JOURNAL BOOKLET MAGAZINE BOOK BACK Make the Title stand out

7 Some notes: December, 2010, p6 The MAGAZINE or JOURNAL always needs either DATE or the VOLUME and ISSUE number in the format Volume:Issue (i.e. 12:4) and the page number of the ARTICLE (2 nd Ed) Where there is more than one edition, it MUST be noted in brackets after the title. Usually the text will have been changed, edited or amended if a new edition has been produced. (Eds) Where the named contributors are the Editors then it needs to be clear. Adding (Ed) or (Eds) after the names is the way to do this. It will be clearly identified on the publication. BACK

8 Where there are two sources with the same Author and YEAR then you need to make a distinction between them. The best way to do this is by assigning letters to them, i.e. ‘a’, ‘b’ and so on. Both these online booklets are written by Public Health Agency and they are both published in 2010, and they both have nearly the same title! It is clear to the reader if we write: (Public Health Agency, 2010b) because they can link it straight to the details in the Bibliography: Public Health Agency (2010b) Inequalities in health and wellbeing: working together for change - Reducing smoking in pregnancy. [online booklet] Public Health Agency. Available at: cing%20Smoking%20in%20Pregnancy.pdf [Accessed on: 16/12/2010] BACK

9 It is important to give an indication of what the resource actually is so that your reader knows what you are referring to. There are such a wide variety of things which are published on the web that an on-line resource could be ANYTHING, from a booklet to a novel! Here we have: [online booklet] [e-Book] (Note that this information goes in square brackets) BACK What it is…

10 It is important for an e-Resource to add the link to the web-page that the resource can be found on. It is customary to write Available at: and then add the URL To find the URL simply look in the address bar at the top of your web-browser: The URL will be here HIGHLIGHT the whole lot, copy and paste it into your Bibliography BACK

11 It is important to note the date you looked at the resource, as the web is usually constantly being updated and re-written. If it was a while since you gained access to the material it may even have been deleted! Noting the date that you accessed the material means that the reader can make allowances for this. BACK The Date

12 When you use (or ‘cite’) source material in your work, you need to make sure that your reader knows where the material has come from. You can make an easy link to your Bibliography by using two KEY Bits of information: Author’s Surname and YEAR Where you have directly quoted the source, you will also need to include the page number where the information is found. Usually something like this: “Quote” (Author’s Surname, YEAR, p#) Over the next few pages, you will see how this system is an effective way to make clear what source material is used, by linking the information to your bibliography. In-text Citations HOMENEXT The Rules

13 NEXT BACK Hit ‘NEXT’ to view the Bibliography for these citations Here are some examples of In-text Citations: Self-Actualisation (Maslow, 1954 cited in Chapman, 2010) as the end- product of a pre-determined hierarchical process is not consistent with reality. Elander cites the “separately organised and funded sectors” (et al, 2009, p1) as a key contributor to the misalignment of FE and HE; Davies highlights the abundant “misconceptions” (et al, n.d., p25) of students as a major factor in their struggle to adjust from one to the other. The importance of honesty in the “10 commandments” (Anshel, 1997, p212) of sports coaching cannot be underestimated. During the late nineties, dance was considered, academically, as a ‘poor relation’ within cultural studies (Koritz, 1996).

14 Anshel, M. (1997) Sport Psychology from theory to practice (3 rd Ed) Scottsdale, Arizona: Gorsuch Scarisbrick. Chapman, A. (2010) Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs motivational model. Businessballs Website [online]. Available at: [Accessed on: 06/01/2011] Davies, J., Bentley, H. & Holland, L. (n.d.) Transition to HE: the impact of perceptions of students and staff. Report. Wolverhampton: University of Wolverhampton Elander, J., Norton, L., McDonough, G. & Foxcoft, A. (2009) Academic Writing and the FE-HE Transition: Cross-Sector Working and UK Education Policy. Report. Derby: University of Derby Koritz, A. (1996) ‘Re/Moving Boundaries: From Dance History to Cultural Studies’ in Morris, G. (Ed) (1996) moving words: re-writing dance. Abingdon: Routledge. BACK Here’s the Bibliography (in alphabetical order, of course…!) Hit the BACK button and use the ‘info’ buttons to look at these in more detail HOME

15 Chapman, A. (2010) Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs motivational model. Businessballs Website [online]. Available at: [Accessed on: 06/01/2011] BACK (Maslow, 1954 cited in Chapman, 2010) This is the information which the source has referred to BUT which you have not read Bibliography entry: Citation: This is called ‘Secondary’ referencing because you have found the information ‘Second Hand’. For more information on writing the Bibliography for e-Resources see: Bibliograhy Layout Online Sources

16 Elander cites… (et al, 2009, p1) This is the page number where the information is found BACK Bibliography entry: These authors are represented by ‘et al’ Elander, J., Norton, L., McDonough, G. & Foxcoft, A. (2009) Academic Writing and the FE-HE Transition: Cross-Sector Working and UK Education Policy. Report. Derby: University of Derby Citation: Where the name of the author is used in the sentence, then the information goes in brackets after it. Because in this case we have used a quote: Elander cites the “separately organised and funded sectors” Then we also need the page number. NEXT Click ‘NEXT’ to view the Bibliography entry and Citation for Davies et al For more info on et al CLICK HERE

17 Davies, J., Bentley, H. & Holland, L. (n.d.) Transition to HE: the impact of perceptions of students and staff. Report. Wolverhampton: University of Wolverhampton Davies highlights… (et al, n.d., p25) There is no date for this text, so you simply need to write ‘n.d.’ BACK Bibliography entry: Citation: In this case there are only three named authors, but et al has been used for the sake of neatness. All authors are still credited as normal within the Bibliography.

18 BACK Bibliography entry: Citation: Anshel, M. (1997) Sport Psychology from theory to practice (3rd Ed) Scottsdale, Arizona: Gorsuch Scarisbrick. “10 commandments” (Anshel, 1997, p212) This is the simplest form of citation. It follows the format: “Quote” (Author’s Surname, YEAR, p#) There MUST be a page number included in this citation as the reader should be able to find the exact place in the text where the quote was found.

19 Koritz, A. (1996) ‘Re/Moving Boundaries: From Dance History to Cultural Studies’ in Morris, G. (Ed) (1996) moving words: re-writing dance. Abingdon: Routledge. (Koritz, 1996) BACK Bibliography entry: Citation: Because there is no “quote” in this sentence then there is no page number to be referred to. This sentence refers to the idea about dance put forward by Koritz within her essay. You only need to cite the two KEY Bits of information: (Author’s Surname and YEAR)

20 BACK The Rules for in-text citations: 1.Don’t use the author’s initial – only the surname is needed 2.Where you have used a “quote” you ALWAYS need the page number 3.Use et al where there are three or more authors 4.Make sure the information is accurate 5.Ask yourself the question – does it make sense to me?

21 The ‘info’ buttons take you a description or explanation of the highlighted part. Match the highlight colour to the colour of the button. HOME This resource uses buttons and links for navigation. The buttons are quite big and clear: BACK Takes you back to the page you previously viewed NEXT Takes you forward to the next page. This button will not always appear. HOME Takes you to the ‘Home’ page – try it! (Below, right) BACK NEXT


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