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How do initial teacher training and professional development programmes impact on teaching and learning practices within educational contexts and subsequently,

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Presentation on theme: "How do initial teacher training and professional development programmes impact on teaching and learning practices within educational contexts and subsequently,"— Presentation transcript:

1 How do initial teacher training and professional development programmes impact on teaching and learning practices within educational contexts and subsequently, learner identities in relation to mathematics? Teacher development Pat Drake, Mathematical Relationships, Sheffield, May 2007 1  What do educational contexts look like and feel like?  How can we locate teacher development with people’s personal stories-to-date?

2 mathematics for teaching  PGCE trainee teachers of mathematics before they start PGCE  Teaching assistants supporting secondary mathematics  Teachers retrained to teach mathematics from other subjects  Non-specialist teachers of mathematics in the university  Craft supervisors on Youth Training Schemes confronted with ‘Core Skills’ in Numeracy. Pat Drake, Mathematical Relationships, Sheffield, May 2007 2

3 Jacques Marie Emile Lacan, 1901 - 1981 Jacques Marie Emile Lacan, a French psychoanalyst. Lacan links closely with 20th century artists and writers, such as Dali, Picasso, Bréton, Joyce. Pat Drake, Mathematical Relationships, Sheffield, May 2007 3

4 Identity is mediated through language  Imaginary self  Desire  Real self  Symbolic order  Deferred signifier  ‘The one who knows’ Pat Drake, Mathematical Relationships, Sheffield, May 2007 4

5 PGCE trainee teachers of mathematics before they start PGCE (1) Andrew: I had decided that because of the nature of maths homework (lots of short solutions to problems as opposed to long essays) it would lend itself excellently to doing at the bus stop and on the bus to and from college. This would save me from doing any work in my own time. The natural subject to accompany double maths was of course physics as the syllabuses overlapped quite a bit resulting with less overall work to do. Pat Drake, Mathematical Relationships, Sheffield, May 2007 5

6 PGCE trainee teachers of mathematics before they start PGCE (2) Pete : I suspect that I wasn’t a particularly interesting student to teach. I was probably a very poor contributor to lessons. My approach to learning was a solitary one...I rarely remember getting much attention from the teachers, and now no teacher stands out in my recollection above any other. Although I hope that since this time my experiences have helped develop a more open and group oriented approach to learning, the ability to quickly teach myself something from a book has stayed with me and proved invaluable. Pat Drake, Mathematical Relationships, Sheffield, May 2007 6

7 PGCE trainee teachers of mathematics before they start PGCE (3) Janet: Our teacher came across as if she too were working out the answers for the first time and had as much to learn as us. We would end a lesson not having discovered an answer and come to the next lesson hoping to be the one to have solved the problem in the meantime. Mrs Matton recounted how she always slept with a notepad by her bed, as sometimes the answers would come to her in the middle of her dreams. I empathised with this as it often happened to me. Pat Drake, Mathematical Relationships, Sheffield, May 2007 7

8 Teaching assistants supporting secondary mathematics (1) I only really got interested in maths when my daughter, who is now eighteen, started here, and brought some homework, and asked for some help, and I couldn’t help her. And then I noticed that the school ran an adult basic skills class. So I originally came to get help with my daughter’s homework, and from that I got interested in maths, and I took an adult achievement award, and then I moved on to GCSE foundation and then to GCSE intermediate. I just found that I, you know, quite like maths. It was interesting and a completely different experience than I had when I was learning it for myself. Pat Drake, Mathematical Relationships, Sheffield, May 2007 8

9 Teaching assistants supporting secondary mathematics (2) I'd always done an evening class or something, and always I'd been getting a bit of training through work and to be honest some of it was damn easy, well I wanted to do something a little bit more advanced. I got on to the Diploma and enjoyed it so I thought I'd give it a go. And there was an element of there not being many maths teachers, and seeing people coming in and thinking I'm sure I couldn't do any worse than they do. I might not be able to do any better but I don't think I could do any worse. It sort of spurs you on. Pat Drake, Mathematical Relationships, Sheffield, May 2007 9

10 Teaching assistants supporting secondary mathematics (3) I went to a grammar school, I wanted to do A-level maths and was told I wasn't good enough and I wasn't allowed to do it. I used to quite like it at school, and I was quick to learn things,..I used and still do like playing around with numbers. The second year was this Scottish bloke, he was horrible, the third year was a really nice bloke again, it depended on the teacher as to how I got on. And then we had the Scottish git again for my O ‑ level, and I think I could have done a lot better if I'd had one of the other teachers. Pat Drake, Mathematical Relationships, Sheffield, May 2007 10

11 If maths were an animal what would it be? Probably it’s a goat, probably tethered in space. Can be awkward but quite nice really. Pat Drake, Mathematical Relationships, Sheffield, May 2007 11

12 whatever the level of previous mathematical attainment...  Individuals’ perception of their own performance in mathematics, and how this relates to their experience of learning  Relationships between teaching and learning mathematics  Enjoyment/pain of (un) successfully dealing with difficulties  Significant other people in learning mathematics  Competition and comparison  Auto-didacticism, self-control and independence  Class, gender, opportunity Pat Drake, Mathematical Relationships, Sheffield, May 2007 12

13 References Entwistle, N.J. (1981) Styles of Learning and Teaching. Chichester: John Wiley and Sons. Una Hanley (2007)‘Fantasies of teaching: handling the paradoxes inherent in models of practice’ British Educational Research Journal, 33, 2 253:271 April 2007.British Educational Research Journal332 Una Hanley and Liz Jones (2007) ‘Mathematics and Fantasies of Effective Practice’ Contemporary Issues in Early Childhood 8, 1 61:72 2007 Darian Leader and Judy Groves (1995) Lacan for beginners. Cambridge: Ikon Books. Miller-Reilly, B (2000) ‘Exploration and Modelling in a University Mathematics Course: Perceptions of Adult Students’. In Coben, D. et al (eds.) Perspectives on Adults Learning Mathematics; Research and Practice Doredrecht/Boston/London: Kluwer Academic Publishers. Pat Drake, Mathematical Relationships, Sheffield, May 2007 13


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