Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

What is required of teachers as they create classroom teaching and learning climates that promote informed civic engagement. Ethan Lowenstein, Ph.D. Associate.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "What is required of teachers as they create classroom teaching and learning climates that promote informed civic engagement. Ethan Lowenstein, Ph.D. Associate."— Presentation transcript:

1 What is required of teachers as they create classroom teaching and learning climates that promote informed civic engagement. Ethan Lowenstein, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Curriculum and Instruction

2 Civic and Moral Education Initiative Colloquium Series on Civic and Moral Education Teacher Knowledge Demands in Promoting Informed Civic Engagement: A Response to Robert Selman Ethan Lowenstein Harvard University December 12, 2008

3 Moving squarely into teacher practice… Cognitive, social, and emotional demands on teachers are huge. Sometimes in adopting a vision of teaching as a craft or art we mistakenly focus on unsustainable and unrealistic expectations for this teacher load. Teachers in the field are helped most when they are given guidance that relieves heavy cognitive demands. Experts are able to give more focused attention to complex problem solving when their proverbial house is in order. (Sternberg, 1995)

4 The Facing History Scope and Sequence Example From a teaching for understanding perspective Facing History helps teachers with: Generative concepts and questions (what are my goals? What are the goals of my “discipline”?) Anchored in specific curriculum materials (what curriculum materials help me achieve my goals?) Sequenced and spiraled from simple to complex over time (how do I order concepts and questions, materials, mapping backwards from student performances of their understanding)

5 Sliding rapidly down to practice… How do I prioritize, coordinate, and creatively integrate multiple instructional goals (e.g. civic competencies, historical understanding, social and ethical awareness), with the perspectives and needs of different students in the classroom group setting in specific moments of time?

6 Navigating teaching tensions related to classroom climate Teacher decision-making (explicit and tacit) is characterized by a lack of “either-or” solutions. Sophisticated teachers contextualize their decisions. It is very important how teachers map and frame these tensions. For example,   Disclosure of one’s viewsNeutrality (Hess,2008)   Classroom managementInstruction in subject

7 Moving away from the “management” metaphor…. How do teachers promote civic discussions around teasing, ostracism, bystanding, and social incidents that regularly occur in the classroom and school? How do teachers promote discussion of historical cases with civic content?

8 Creative Integration Concepts (e.g. Agency, causation, bystander), questions translated into a language that students understand (e.g. “We v. they” “Who should I include in my ‘universe of responsibility?” “What choices do people make when faced with injustice?”). One can interrogate these concepts and questions through the examination of both historical content and classroom social content. Both classroom social content and historical content can be portals or entry points to interrogate concepts and questions salient to informed civic engagement.

9 The Facing History Scope and Sequence Example From a teaching for understanding perspective Facing History helps teachers with: Generative concepts and questions (what are my goals? What are the goals of my “discipline”?) Anchored in specific curriculum materials (what curriculum materials help me achieve my goals?) Sequenced and spiraled from simple to complex over time (how do I order concepts and questions, materials, mapping backwards from student performances of their understanding)

10 Let’s reframe an old tension with a new vision of climate to promote informed civic engagement Classroom management----Instruction in subject becomes…. Knowing how to interrogate a set of civic concepts and questions through entering and navigating through the portals of… Historical content Classroom social content

11 Landing hard in practice… In many high school climates, many students arrive in class cynical, distrustful of adult authority, and without feelings of efficacy—that they can successfully “play the game of school.” The most important question in relation to teacher expertise and professional development is not “can adolescents really learn anything about civic engagement by studying historical cases of attempts to destroy it?” The question is how can teachers in the H.S. context do so with maximum effect when they have students for 4-5 months, an hour a day, and have to integrate and navigate multiple goals with students with varied developmental needs? What professional development experiences support expertise in moving deftly in and out of historical content and classroom social portals?


Download ppt "What is required of teachers as they create classroom teaching and learning climates that promote informed civic engagement. Ethan Lowenstein, Ph.D. Associate."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google