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January 2014 Business Training of KCIC Clients Taxation in Kenya.

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Presentation on theme: "January 2014 Business Training of KCIC Clients Taxation in Kenya."— Presentation transcript:

1 January 2014 Business Training of KCIC Clients Taxation in Kenya

2 Table of Content Business Training of KCIC Clients 2 28 January 2014 Sections: 1 Business registration 6 2 Pay As You Earn (PAYE) 10 3 Value Added Tax (VAT) 15 4 Corporate Tax 20 5 Withholding Tax 29 6 Excise duty 34 Page Section Overview

3 Introduction Business Training of KCIC Clients 3 28 January 2014

4 Introductions……. Business Training of KCIC Clients 4 28 January 2014

5 Your Expectations Lets hear them… Business Training of KCIC Clients 5 28 January 2014

6 Business Registration Business Training of KCIC Clients 6 28 January

7 Setting up in Kenya 7 Under the Kenyan Companies Act, there are two relevant legal forms of registration:  A branch of a foreign company; or  A Limited Liability Company (a subsidiary). There are no statutory restrictions on operating either as branch or a subsidiary. A branch for tax purposes is a company incorporated outside Kenya and has been registered under the Kenyan Companies Act and received a Certificate of Compliance A subsidiary is a locally incorporated company registered under the Kenyan Companies Act and received a Certificate of Incorporation.

8 Illustrative incorporation process map 8

9 9 Differences between a subsidiary and a branch

10 Pay as You Earn Business Training of KCIC Clients January

11 Definition of terms “employer” includes any resident person responsible for the payment of, or on account of, emoluments to an employee. Resident individual- A person is resident in Kenya where: they have a permanent home in Kenya and are in Kenya even for a single day in the tax year (calendar year) they do not have a permanent home in Kenya but are in Kenya for: 183 days or more in aggregate during the current tax year an average of more than 122 days per year in the current tax year and the two preceding years Payroll Management -Include all taxable remuneration, including benefits and unaccounted for allowances and ensure that the correct tax treatment is applied. Business Training of KCIC Clients January 2014

12 PAYE - what is an emolument? Income Tax Act (Sec 5(2)) “gains or profits” include: wages, salary, leave pay, sick pay, payment in lieu of leave, fees, commission, bonus, gratuity, or subsistence, travelling, entertainment or other allowance received in respect of employment or services rendered. PAYE guide (2009)  Wages, salary, leave pay, sick pay, payment in lieu of leave, directors’ fees and other fees, overtime, commission, bonus, gratuity or pension.  Cash allowances  The amount of any private expenditure of the employee paid by the employer otherwise than as a loan.  Non-cash benefits where the aggregate value exceeds KES 3,000 pm  Value of housing where provided by the employer. 12

13 Deadlines 13 ObligationDeadline Remit monthly PAYE and FBT9 th of the following month or last weekday before if 9 th is on weekend or public holiday. NB- directors! File annual self assessment returns (SARs) Effective 1 July 2013, all individuals earning income in Kenya are required to file an individual Self Assessment Return as per the Finance Act 2012 gazetted in February Payment of monthly NHIF dues 1 st of the next month (by concession, can be paid by the 9 th ). Payment of monthly NSSF dues 15 th of the following month. Payment of monthly National Industrial Training Levy (NITA) 10 th of the following month

14 Accounting for PAYE 14 Case study. In the month of September 2013, Mary Natasha received income from his employer as detailed below: o Basic salary- KES 120,000 o House allowance- KES 30,000 o Overtime- KES 5,000 Calculate his taxable income Mary Natasha Taxable income September 2013 Basic salary 120,000 Add House allowance 30,000 Overtime 5,000 Taxable income 155,000

15 Value Added Tax Business Training of KCIC Clients January

16 Rates of Tax Business Training of KCIC Clients January 2014 Two rates for VAT:  0% for zero rated supplies - such as export of goods and service, supply of natural water excluding bottled water by any political division approved by cabinet secretary for water.  16% for any other supply. Exempt goods- medicaments, live animals, maize, fertilisers, unprocessed milk, plant and machinery of chapter 84 and 85, vegetables, aeroplanes. Plant and Machinery- such as boilers, turbines, Agricultural, horticultural or forestry machinery for soil preparation or cultivation; lawn or sports-ground rollers, milking machines, machinery for animal feeds, Electrical capacitors, fixed, variable or adjustable.

17 Accounting for VAT “input tax” means tax paid or payable on the supply to a registered person of any goods or services to be used by him for the purpose of his business (“VAT on purchases”) “output tax” means tax which is due on taxable supplies (“VAT on sales”) VAT registration A person is required to register for VAT if he supplies taxable goods (16% and 0% VAT) in excess of KES 5M per annum. Time to account for VAT: on which goods are delivered or services performed; a certificate is issued by an architect, surveyor, or consultant; on which the invoice is issued; or on which payment for is received, in whole or part January 2014Business Training of KCIC Clients 17

18 VAT is payable to KRA by 20th day of the following month in which VAT was deducted. Refund of VAT where input tax exceeds output tax as a result of making zero-rated supplies. Case study. In the month of August 2013, James bought taxable goods (at 16%)worth KES 800,000. He sold all the goods in the same month at KES 1,000,000. Calculate the amount of VAT payable. In the month of September 2013, Alice bought taxable goods (at 16%)worth KES 800,000. She sold all the goods to Nigeria (export of goods)in the same month at KES 1,000,000. Calculate the amount of VAT payable/refundable. 18 Accounting for VAT

19 19 Taxable sales at 16% Sales 1,000, ,000 Purchases 800,000128,000 VAT Payable to KRA 32,000 Zero rated sales VAT Sales (exports) 1,000,000 0 Purchases800,000128,000 VAT Refundable by KRA (128,000) Accounting for VATAccounting for Corporate Tax- companies

20 Corporate Tax Business Training of KCIC Clients January

21 Definition of terms Business Training of KCIC Clients January 2014 “Income tax” shall be charged for each year of income upon all the income of a person, whether resident or non-resident, which accrued in or was derived from Kenya. “Income chargeable to tax” includes gains and profits from business and right granted to another person for use or occupation of property among others. Resident to a body of persons, means: That the body is a company incorporated under a law of Kenya; or That the management and control of the affairs of the body was exercised in Kenya in a particular year of income under consideration; or That the body has been declared by the Minister by notice in the Gazette, to be resident in Kenya for any year of income.

22 A branch is taxed at 37.5% on its adjusted net profit (Gross revenue less expenses incurred wholly and exclusively in production of income) A subsidiary is taxed at 30% on its adjusted net profit (Gross revenue less expenses incurred wholly and exclusively in production of income) Expenses must be “incurred wholly and exclusively in generating income” Incurred - income at a cost or borne by the business. Expenses incurred by another party for the benefit of the business will not qualify. Wholly and exclusively - have a direct link to activities leading to earning the specific taxable income Disallowance of costs not related to business e.g. certain donations, personal expenditure, fines and penalties. Allowable expenses include-Training costs, employees costs, prevention of soil erosion, capital expenditure for clearing and planting certain crops Revenue- Allowable Expenses = Adjusted taxable profit which is taxed at 30%. 22 Definition of terms

23 23 DetailsRate p.a Investment allowance Within Nairobi, Kisumu and Mombasa Outside Nairobi, Kisumu and Mombasa>200 M Building/ Machinery used for manufacture including electricity generation 100% 150% Wear and tear allowance Class 1-Tractors, combined harvesters Class 2- computer and computer peripherals Class 3- motor vehicles- light Class 4- all other machinery including ships 37.5% 30% 25% 12.5% Software allowance Capital expenditure on the purchase or acquisition of the right to the use of a computer software 20% Farm work Farmhouses (cost restricted to 1/3)- Labour quarters: Immovable buildings necessary for proper operation of farm: fences, dips, drains, water & electricity supply works other than machinery, windbreaks, other works necessary for proper operation of the farm: 100% Industrial building allowance Buildings used as a factory, mill, storage10% Capital allowances

24 24 TaxDeadline/ObligationPenaltyInterest Instalment tax payment- companies other than agricultural companies Four instalments of 25% each due by 20 th of the 4 th, 6 th, 9 th and 12 th month of the accounting month 20% of the amount due 2% per month Instalment tax payment- agricultural companies Two instalments of 75% and 25% due by 20 th of the, 9 th and 12 th month respectively of the accounting month 20% of the amount due 2% per month Balance of tax payment 4 months after accounting period 20% of the amount due 2% per month - Should not exceed principal tax Filing of self assessment return 6 months after accounting period 5% of the normal tax min. KES 10,000 Deadlines, penalties & interest

25 Case study: The following is the composition of profit and loss account for Mango Company Ltd for the year of income Sales- KES 2,000,000 Purchases- KES 1,000,000 Administrative expenses- KES 400,000 Administrative expenses consisted of donation-KES 50,000 Depreciation-KES 30,000 Wear and tear allowance amounted to KES 20,000. Calculate the amount of Corporate tax payable. 25 Accounting for Corporate Tax- companies

26 26 Mango company Ltd Profit and loss account Year ended 31 December2012 KES Sales2,000,000 purchases(1,000,000) Gross profit1,000,000 Admin expenses(400,000) Profit before tax600,000 Mango company Ltd Tax computation Year ended 31 December2012 KES Profit before tax 600,000 Add back-disallowed expenses Donations50,000 Depreciation30,00080,000 Less Wear and tear allowance(20,000) Taxable profit660,000 Corporate Tax (30%)198,000 Accounting for Corporate Tax- companies

27 Case study: The following is the composition of profit and loss account for SKL Company Ltd for the year of income Sales- KES 2,000,000 Purchases- KES 1,000,000 Administrative expenses- KES 400,000 Fair value gain of biological assets ( trees)- KES 100,000 Administrative expenses consisted of donation-KES 50,000 Depreciation- KES 30,000 Construction of labour quarters amounted to KES 30,000. Calculate the amount of Corporate tax payable. 27 Accounting for Corporate Tax- agricultural companies

28 28 Accounting for Corporate Tax- agricultural companies SKL company Ltd Profit and loss account Year ended 31 December2012 KES Sales2,000,000 purchases(1,000,000) Gross profit1,000,000 Other income (fair value gain)100,000 Admin expenses(400,000) Profit before tax700,000 SKL company Ltd Tax computation Year ended 31 December2012 KES Profit before tax 700,000 Add back-disallowed expenses Donations50,000 Depreciation30,00080,000 Less Fair value gain on biological assets 100,000 Labor Quarters30,000(130,000) Taxable profit650,000 Corporate Tax (30%)195,000

29 Withholding Tax Business Training of KCIC Clients January

30 WHT is a portion of payment withheld by the party making payment to another (payee) and paid to the Tax Authority. The objective of the WHT system is that tax is withheld (retained) by the payer and given directly to the Tax Authority, at the time the payer makes payment to the payee. The tax collected under this system belongs to the payee with respect to payments, while the payer is only an agent for the Tax Authority. WHT is payable to KRA by 20th of the month following the month in which WHT was deducted. The person who deducts WHT (Payer) furnishes the Payee with the WHT certificate showing the amount of WHT deducted. 30 What is Withholding tax?

31 31 Payments to Non-residents: Management/professional fees Royalty Rent for use or occupation of property Dividend Interest and deemed interest Pension or retirement annuity Payment to sportsmen or artists Winnings - betting & gaming Payments to Residents: Management or professional fees (if more than 24k a month) – technical, management, contractual, training. Dividend Interest Pension in excess of tax exempt amounts Royalty-Right to use Commission/fee for provision of insurance cover Winnings - betting & gaming Section 35 of the ITA sets out the payments that are subject to withholding tax Payments subject to WHT

32 32 PaymentResidentNon- resident Management and professional fees (management fees, technical fees, contractual, consultancy, training fees, agency fees) 520 Contractual fees320 Dividend >12.5%voting power <12.5%voting power Qualifying divided Exempt Qualifying Interest: Housing bonds Bearer Instruments Other N/A Royalties520 Rent: Immovable property Others N/A WHT rate on dividend paid to citizens of East Africa Community Partner States-5% WHT rate on management/professional/training fees paid to citizens of East Africa Community Partner States-15% WHT rates

33 33 Tax Invoice Withholding tax calculation FromXYZ Ltd ToABC LtdGross amount 100,000 Withholding tax (5%) (5,000) DescriptionAmount (KES)Net amount paid to XYZ 95,000 Accounting services 100,000 VAT 16,000 Total Amount 116,000 Case study: ABC Limited received accounting services from XYZ limited. The invoice amount was KES 100,000 as indicated in the table below. Calculate the withholding tax. Accounting for WHT

34 Excise Duty Business Training of KCIC Clients January

35 An excise or excise tax (sometimes called a duty of excise or a special tax) is a tax on consumption levied on goods produced within a country. It is generally an indirect tax i.e. the consumer bears the burden of tax as opposed to the producer/ manufacturer of the good(s). Excise duties are distinguished generally from other indirect taxes in the following ways: a)Excise duties typically target a narrow range of products. b)Excise duties are very ‘heavy’, accounting for higher fractions of the retail price of products. c)Excise duties are mostly specific though in some cases a hybrid of specific and ad-valorem rates may be used. 35 What is Excise Duty?

36 ▪ Governed under Cap. 472, Customs and Excise Act ▪ The Fifth Schedule of the Act provides a listing of all excisable goods and the rates of duty Section 90: Provides that all manufacturers of excisable goods must seek a license before commencement of such manufacture. It makes it an offence to manufacture excisable goods without a license Section 91: Provides that: A separate application shall be required in respect of  each factory in which excisable goods are to be manufactured  each class of excisable goods to be manufactured. A license shall be issued to a particular a person and shall be in respect of the factory and class of excisable goods specified in the license; 36 Legislation

37 37 CategoryGoods descriptionExcise duty rate Beer KES 70 per litre or 50% whichever is higher Other alcoholic beverages WinesKES 80 per litre or 50% whichever is higher) SpiritsKES 120 per litre or 35% whichever is higher Tobacco and tobacco products CigarettesKES 1,200 per mile or 35% of RSP Soft drinksCarbonated drinks0.07 WaterKES 3 per liter or 5% of whichever is higher Excisable servicesMobile cellular phone services0.1 Money transfer services and fees 0.1 Rates of Excise Duty


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