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PSAT RESULTS NOW WHAT??? The Princeton Review 4555 Roosevelt Way NE, Seattle, WA 98105 888-578-8378 x 1030.

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Presentation on theme: "PSAT RESULTS NOW WHAT??? The Princeton Review 4555 Roosevelt Way NE, Seattle, WA 98105 888-578-8378 x 1030."— Presentation transcript:

1 PSAT RESULTS NOW WHAT??? The Princeton Review 4555 Roosevelt Way NE, Seattle, WA x 1030

2 Page 2 Topics for Today The PSAT Score Report The National Merit Scholarship Program Where Your Scores Will Take You Admissions Timeline Overview of Admissions Tests Tricks of the Trade Test Prep Options

3 Page 3 Preliminary SAT What does this mean? A practice version test before the SAT Qualifying exam for National Merit Scholarships

4 Page 4 Making a Plan Taking the PSAT A great way to jumpstart your college admissions planning. You’ll get an idea of how standardized tests work See how you perform in a high-pressure testing situation Most importantly, you’ll get SCORES to give you a starting point

5 Your Scores Score You can see your projected SAT score online in My College QuickStart (www.collegeboard.com/quickst art). Score Range Percentile If you are a junior, your scores are compared to those of other juniors. If you are a sophomore or younger student, your scores are compared to those of sophomores.

6 Page 6 Raw Scores Raw Score = How Many Questions You Got Right »Reading: 48 questions »Math: 38 Questions »Writing: 29 questions »TOTAL: 125 questions

7 Page 7 Guessing Penalty Get It Right:+1 Raw Point Leave It Blank:+0 Raw Points Get It Wrong:- 1/4 Raw Point

8 Page 8 Your Final Score 1. College Board takes your Raw Score from each section. 2. They plug it into a algorithm (which is different for each test date). 3. You get a “Scaled” Score from for each section, and Overall. This is why there is variation with the score range.

9 National Merit Scholarship Corporation Information The Selection Index is the sum of your critical reading, mathematics and writing skills scores. Highest = 240 Lowest = 60 If it has an asterisk, you do not meet all of the eligibility requirements for the competition. The Percentile compares your performance to that of other college-bound juniors, or sophomores if you are sophomore or younger. The Entry Requirements section displays information you provided on your answer sheet.

10 Your Skills See how you did on each skill. The same skills are tested on the SAT. You can try hundreds of practice questions, organized by skill, online in My College QuickStart (www.collegeboard.com/quickstart).

11 Your Answers You will get your test book back with your PSAT/NMSQT results, so that you can review the questions. You can also review each test question in My College QuickStart.

12 Your Answers: Student Responses Some of the math problems required you to grid in answers instead of selecting an option. For these questions, you will see the correct answer(s) written out.

13 Page 13 Math Pacing Even though the questions have different levels of difficulty, they are all worth the same amount of points. So, if easy questions have the same point value as hard ones – which type of question would you want to spend the most time on? THE EASY ONES!

14 Next Steps What’s next? Use the access code on your report to log in to My College QuickStart, a personalized college and career planning kit. There you can: Search for colleges Get a personalized SAT study plan Take a personality test to find majors and careers that fit your aspirations

15 Page 15 Math Pacing Question #1Question #20 EasyHard Math Tips: It’s all about the pacing. Getting the easy ones = more raw points = higher overall Math Score. SLOW DOWN and SCORE MORE!

16 Page 16 Writing Pacing Writing Section Order of Difficulty Structure 1. Improving Sentences (20 questions) - from Easy to Hard 2. Error IDs (14 questions) – from Easy to Hard 3. Improving Paragraphs (5 questions) – all Easy or Medium Writing Tips: Know when the Order of Difficulty “re-sets.” Consider doing the Improving Paragraphs ?s first.

17 Page 17 Reading Pacing For Critical Reading, you have to rely on your own Personal Order of Difficulty. Reading Tips: Spend your time on the answers that you CAN answer. Consider omitting questions to save time. Improve your vocabulary! Read and study.

18 Page 18 Admissions Timeline College Research 1-2 “Safety” Schools A Handful of “Target” Schools 1-2 “Reach” Schools Use the FREE Counselor- O-Matic tool online at PrincetonReview.comi to get started!i SAT on Jan 26 ACT on Feb 9 SAT on March 9 ACT on April 13SAT on May 4 AP Testing SAT on June 1 ACT on June 8 SAT II Subject Tests

19 Page 19 Admissions Timeline Make a Testing Plan SAT or ACT? When will you take your first test? How long will you need to prep? When during the year are you going to have time to prep? Make sure to leave enough time to re-take the test at least once! SAT on Jan 26 ACT on Feb 9 SAT on March 9 ACT on April 13SAT on May 4 AP Testing SAT on June 1 ACT on June 8 SAT II Subject Tests

20 Page 20 Admissions Timeline College Visits Take a tour Talk with actual students Try it out: eat in the school cafeteria! Be a savvy college shopper – this campus may be where you spend the next four years of your life! SAT on Jan 26 ACT on Feb 9SAT on March 9 ACT on April 13 SAT on May 4 AP Testing SAT on June 1 ACT on June 8 SAT II Subject Tests

21 Page 21 Admissions Timeline Start looking at applications Think about recommendations, essays, and resumes Start hunting for scholarships If You’re Sure: Early Decision and/or Early Action

22 Page 22 Admissions Timeline Retake the SAT or ACT if necessary Fill out those applications early! Apply for Financial Aid as early as January 1 st ! 2014

23 Page 23 Admissions Tests PSATSATACTSAT Subject Tests Is it Required? Length Subjects and Sections Scoring and Penalties Score Choice No Yes Sometimes 2.5 hours 3 hours, 45 minutes without breaks 3 hours, 25 minutes for Essay 1 hour Reading (2 ) Writing (1) Math (2 ) Reading (3) Writing (3) Math (3) E xperimental (1) English (1), Math (1), Reading (1), Science (1), Optional Essay (1) By Subject each section, overall, +1 right +0 blank, -1/4 wrong each section, overall, +1right, 0 blank, -1/4 wrong 1-36 is average of scores from all parts of test, no guessing penalty scale +1 right, +0 blank, -1/4 wrong No Yes

24 Page 24 SAT vs. ACT – which one is for you? SAT vs ACT Choose the lesser of two evils… Pick the one that is best for YOU! How We Can Help Take our FREE Princeton Review Assessment (PRA)

25 The SAT and ACT: A Brief Introduction

26 What do SAT/ACT Scores Really Measure? How well you performed on the SAT/ACT. Not a measure of intelligence.

27 Why do students struggle with the SAT and ACT? SAT and ACTHigh School Number of Questions on the exams Designed so you can’t finish or you really have to rush to finish Designed so you can finish Answer ChoicesCommon errors included in the answer choices Goal is to assess strengths and weaknesses, not to try to get a student to answer all questions incorrectly! Essay25 min (SAT) / 30 min (ACT)Hours & weeks ReadingUnder serious time constraints Read at home MathNo partial credit, the process does not matter Partial credit, the process matters QuestionsIntentionally hardStraight forward

28 Are you an average Joe? You have 3 seconds to pick a number (shhh, keep it a secret)

29 Are you an average Joe? You have 3 seconds to pick a number (shhh, keep it a secret) Raise your hand if you picked a number over 1,000

30 Are you an average Joe? You have 3 seconds to pick a number (shhh, keep it a secret) Raise your hand if you picked a number over 100

31 Are you an average Joe? You have 3 seconds to pick a number (shhh, keep it a secret) Raise your hand if you picked a negative number or a fraction.

32 Are you an average Joe? Raise your hand if you picked a number between 1 and 10.

33 Are you an average Joe? You could have picked any number, but almost all of you chose a number between 1 and 10. That’s because we’re all predictable and the test writers know it! They know which wrong answer choices you’ll like and they put them in the test on purpose.

34 The SAT

35 SAT – Quick Facts Frequency: 7 times/year Duration: 3 hours, 45 minutes Sections: Math, Critical Reading, Writing Cost: $50 Max score: 800 per section Avg. score: –Math: 516 –Critical Reading: 501 –Writing: 492

36 SAT – Critical Reading 67 multiple-choice questions 70 minutes total Tests critical reading, diction, and vocabulary Passage Reading Sentence completion

37 SAT – Math 54 questions (44 multiple-choice and 10 grid-in) 70 minutes (two 25-minute sections and one 20-minute section) Tests basic arithmetic, algebra I & II, and geometry

38 SAT – Math Sample Problem In the figure above, what is the greatest number of non- overlapping regions into which the shaded region can be divided with exactly two straight lines? A)6 B)5 C)4 D)3 E)2 How many actually understood what the question was asking? Using 2 straight lines they are asking you to divide this DOUGHNUT into the maximum number of shaded regions.

39 SAT – Math Sample Problem In the figure above, what is the greatest number of non- overlapping regions into which the shaded region can be divided with exactly two straight lines? A)6 B)5 C)4 D)3 E)2 By a show of hands, who thought the correct answer was? E) 2 D) 3 C) 4 B) 5 A) 6 Go ahead & give it a try!

40 SAT – Math Sample Problem The question basically asked you to divide this doughnut into the highest number of shaded regions possible using 2 straight lines!

41 SAT – Math Sample Problem In the figure above, what is the greatest number of non- overlapping regions into which the shaded region can be divided with exactly two straight lines? A)6 B)5 C)4 D)3 E)2 Strategies used: Rephrase the question in your own words, test writing - is it going to be that easy, P.O.E, physically cross off the wrong answers in the test booklet, Guess after P.O.E, Final leading word. no way that easy P.O.E. 50% chance of getting this right - why might you eliminate 6?

42 SAT – Math Sample Problem

43 SAT – Writing 49 multiple-choice questions 1 essay question 60 minutes (one 25-minute section, one 10- minute section, and one 25-minute essay) Tests your ability to identify sentence errors, improve sentences, improve paragraphs The Grammar portion of the Writing section makes up about 70% of your Writing Score

44 SAT – Scoring Each correct answer earns 1 full point, regardless of level of difficulty. Each unanswered question earns 0 points. Students lose ¼ point for each incorrect answer to a multiple-choice question.

45 If you don’t know an answer should you guess?

46 Guessing What is the capital of Malawi? A.Washington, D.C. B.Paris C.Tokyo D.London E.Lilongwe Only Guess if … you can eliminate many of the choices.

47 A word about SAT Score Choice Some schools require that you send all of your scores. Using Score Choice could do more harm than good, especially when dealing with schools that mix and match subject scores. It’s confusing. You could end up paying for additional score reports or even forgetting to submit scores.

48 The ACT

49 ACT – Quick Facts Frequency: 6 times/year Duration: 3 ½ hours including essay Sections: English, Math, Reading, Science, Writing Cost: $50.50 Max score: 36 Avg score: 21

50 75 multiple-choice questions 45 minutes Tests usage/mechanics and rhetorical skills ACT – English

51 60 multiple-choice questions 60-minute test Emphasis on geometry, some algebra and trigonometry ACT – Math

52 ACT – Math Sample Problem A circle is inscribed in a square, as shown in the figure below. If the square measures 10 feet on a side, which of the following expressions gives the area of the shaded region in square feet? A π B π C π D π E π

53 ACT – Math Sample Problem A circle is inscribed in a square, as shown in the figure below. If the square measures 10 feet on a side, which of the following expressions gives the area of the shaded region in square feet? A π B π C π D π E π Area of the square minus the area of the circle. Area (Square) = length x width P.O.E. eliminate any answer choice that does not have 10 2

54 ACT – Math Sample Problem A circle is inscribed in a square, as shown in the figure below. If the square measures 10 feet on a side, which of the following expressions gives the area of the shaded region in square feet? A π B π C π D π E π Area of the square minus the area of the circle. Area (Square) = length x width P.O.E. eliminate any answer choice that does not have π r2 (missing r 2 ) In the previous example, we deleted CDE, in this example, we got rid of ACE leaving us with B. You could just ballpark and get this right as well! P.O.E. eliminate any answer choice that does not have 10 2

55 ACT – Reading 40 multiple-choice questions 35 minutes 4 Passages including prose fiction, social studies, humanities, and natural sciences Tests your inferring and reasoning skills

56 ACT – Science 40 multiple-choice questions 35-minute test Questions on science-based passages Measures interpretation, analysis, evaluation, reasoning and problem solving

57 ACT Score Choice ACT maintains a separate record for each ACT that you take When sending your scores to schools you designate which score you would like to send You are able to send multiple test scores to colleges/universities ACT cannot create new records by combining scores from different test dates (super score)

58 Which test should I take? There is NO downside to taking both tests. We encourage it! Take a free practice test (SAT, ACT) Princeton Review Assessment (PRA)

59 Top 5 Signs you might prefer the SAT You’re a quick thinker who loves the challenge of puzzles and logic games You can rapidly define a plethora of onerous vocabulary words You prefer to write about WWII and The Great Gatsby than about school uniforms You have a shorter attention span and prefer to complete the exam in small, more ‘bite-sized’ pieces. You rocked the PSAT. Stick with what’s working.

60 Top 5 Signs you might prefer the ACT You pay close attention in math class and understand basic trigonometry You love the challenge of working swiftly and beating the clock You’re good at reading graphs and tables and identifying trends You’re a strong reader and would much rather read a passage than solve a math problem You have a strong GPA, but did not do all that well on the PSAT

61 Basic Strategies Practice Makes Perfect Students should take numerous practice tests Students should not take the tests for the first time when it counts towards admissions! By taking several practice tests students will: Increase confidence & decrease test anxiety Increase overall speed and accuracy

62 Basic Strategies Use a Watch Timing and Pacing are the most difficult aspects of these tests. Wearing a watch helps keep your pacing goals and tells you if you are spending too much time on one section or passage.

63 Basic Strategies Process of Elimination Get in the habit of placing a line through the answers you know are wrong in the test booklet. Use what you know about the order of difficulty to cross off wrong answers.

64 Basic Strategies Week of the Test Read positive articles No fighting with family members or friends Avoid stressful situations

65 Basic Strategies Day of the Test Take the day before the exam off – do not study Get a good night’s sleep on at least 2 days prior to the test Eat a healthy breakfast During breakfast review 1 or 2 easy questions in each section of the test—this will get your brain working

66 College Admissions

67 What’s important for college admissions? HS Transcripts High School GPA Standardized test scores (SAT/ACT/AP/SATII) Personal statement Letters of recommendation Extracurricular activities

68 Mistakes to Avoid College Planning Mistakes to Avoid Failure to plan adequately Failure to develop a counselor-student relationship Putting your parents solely in charge Considering a college solely for its reputation Automatically ruling out private college because of cost Failure to meet your admissions representative Applying to a college you haven’t visited Missing application deadlines Lying or exaggerating on applications Submitting a messy application Not applying to financial aid or not searching for scholarships

69 The Princeton Review Testing Timeline When should you take the SAT/ACT? It is ideal to complete all of your standardized tests by the end of your junior year. Prepare to take it once, plan to take it twice, leave time to take it three times –EA/ED Testing Timeline Junior Year: Fall, Spring Senior Year: Fall –Regular Admissions Junior Year: Spring Senior Year: Fall


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