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Communications: Framing A Message Based on Values Benjamin Chambers, Communications Specialist Seattle, WA – October 24, 2012 Photo: State Library and.

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Presentation on theme: "Communications: Framing A Message Based on Values Benjamin Chambers, Communications Specialist Seattle, WA – October 24, 2012 Photo: State Library and."— Presentation transcript:

1 Communications: Framing A Message Based on Values Benjamin Chambers, Communications Specialist Seattle, WA – October 24, 2012 Photo: State Library and Archives of Florida.State Library and Archives of Florida

2 Q: Who’s the Messenger? A: It’s not Big Bird …

3 Most Trustworthy Messengers Have Expertise, Experience in Juvenile Justice Issues Mental health professionals Former youth offenders Judges Police officers Teachers Parents Advocates Crime victims Religious leaders Prosecutors Doctors Prison wardens Defense attorneys Small business owners Other Poll: “Do You Trust the Messenger?”

4 Agenda 1.How People Think about Issues 2.Laws of Communications 3.Messages Based on Values 4.Message Box 5.Bridging Agenda

5 How People Think About Issues Photo: Library of CongressLibrary of Congress

6 Level One: Big Ideas – Level Two: Types of issues (“civil rights, environment, etc.”) Level Three: Specific policy proposals How People Think About Issues

7 Image via Andy Goodman

8 Agenda Exercise Photo:: State Library of New South WalesState Library of New South Wales

9 Agenda Curse of Knowledge Photo: Rennett StoweRennett Stowe

10 Agenda “It’s an outrage!” Curse of Values Photo: Rennett StoweRennett Stowe

11 Who Are You Trying to Reach? Photo: Benjamin Chambers. All rights reserved.

12 Number of soldier’s moms to galvanize the public to question Bush about the war … 1 Number of parents in Vista, CA who got the school board to support abstinence-only education..9 Number of families that pressed for the 9/11 Commission …………………………………………10 Number of chefs who turned sustainable seafod into a hot commodity Number of Congressional reps needed to move stem-cell legislation…………………………………218 You Don‘t Need Thousands Photo: IzabelhaIzabelha

13 Focus on those you can persuade vs. answering the opposition. Opposition cannot be persuaded. People who can be persuaded = a target audience. Who Are You Trying to Reach? Photo: IzabelhaIzabelha

14 Audiences: What Do They Think? Photo: Library of CongressLibrary of Congress

15 1. Who is/are the audience(s)? 2. What’s the message? 3. What core value is it trying to tap? 4. Who wouldn’t it work for? Why?

16 “Sorry, sweetie, we haven't forgotten how hard it is. We just don't care.

17 “The price of living in a civilized society is that you may have to do the right thing even if it hurts or exposes you to ridicule, discomfort, or even danger …

18 “It's hard to say no to drugs. We know that. We expect you to do it anyway.” – Steven Dutch Professor of Natural and Applied Sciences University of Wisconsin, Green Bay

19 Young men and teen pregnancy prevention. Laws of Communications Photo: robertelyvovrobertelyvov

20 Roswell, NM Bike Lanes Laws of Communications

21 LAW #1: For most audiences, perception = fact. Laws of Communications Photo: rarebeastsrarebeasts

22 Three Little Pigs Photo: Project GutenbergProject Gutenberg

23 Three Little Pigs Photo: Kristi HerbertKristi Herbert

24 Words activate mental “frames.” Framing Photo: eriwst under Creative Commons license.eriwst

25 Even contradictory information can reinforce one’s mental frame. – “Myths vs. Facts” sheets can actually hurt your case – people remember the myths (which reinforce their beliefs) longer than the truth. Framing Photo: Vox Efx under Creative Commons license.Vox Efx

26 Law #2 It’s not what you say … it’s what they hear. Laws of Communications Photo: Ali BrohiAli Brohi

27 LAW #3 We blame the victim. We tend to assume that it’s up to the individual to fix his/her problem. Success stories reinforce this. Laws of Communications

28 So … Translate the individual into a social issue –– – “smoking” is an individual problem, but “tobacco” is not – A student who acts out is an individual with a problem, but “school exclusion” is a social issue Laws of Communications

29 So … Assign primary responsibility – We usu. emphasize social justice – “It’s a moral outrage!” – Instead, we need to personalize the injustice and create a clear picture of who’s benefiting – exploiter vs. exploited – or why everyone is hurt. Present a solution Laws of Communications

30 So … Make a practical appeal – Our solution saves lives, saves money, protects kids, provides a fair chance, rights an injustice – something that appeals to shared values – with concrete examples of how it will benefit the entire community, not just those who suffer from the problem. Laws of Communications

31 So … Target people we can persuade. Start with where they are … build a bridge between them and where you want them – be concrete Repetition and consistency What This Means Photo: aurelio.asianinaurelio.asianin

32 Basic, enduring beliefs that shape how we see ourselves and the world around us. Core Values Photo: Library of CongressLibrary of Congress

33 Audiences: Core Values Photo: Library of CongressLibrary of Congress

34 Primary Values Responsibility to care for one’s family Responsibility to care for oneself Personal liberty Work Spirituality Honesty/Integrity Fairness/Equality Values Secondary Values Responsibility to care for others Personal fulfillment Respect for authority Love of country or culture Source: polling firm, Belden Russonello & Stewart

35 Primary Values Responsibility to care for one’s family Responsibility to care for oneself Personal liberty Work Spirituality Honesty/Integrity Fairness/Equality Values Secondary Values Responsibility to care for others Personal fulfillment Respect for authority Love of country or culture Source: polling firm, Belden Russonello & Stewart

36 Example

37 Goal: Reform death penalty system. Objective: Reduce mistakes in the death penalty system by providing DNA testing and qualified counsel. Example

38 Target audience: federal policymakers – specifically members of the House and Senate judiciary committees. Example

39 Possible messages: 1.Economics - wasteful 2.Disproportionate impact on people of color - unjust 3.It’s wrong to kill people, period - immoral Example

40 Shared value: It’s wrong to kill innocent people. Example

41 Exercise Photo: Library of CongressLibrary of Congress

42 1. Who is/are the audience(s)? 2. What’s the message? 3. What core value is it trying to tap? 4. Who wouldn’t it work for? Why?

43 1. Who is/are the audience(s)? 2. What’s the message? 3. What core value is it trying to tap? 4. Who wouldn’t it work for? Why?

44 1. Who is/are the audience(s)? 2. What’s the message? 3. What core value is it trying to tap? 4. Who wouldn’t it work for? Why?

45 Images of Pushout

46

47 Over 1 Million Students Who Start High School This Year Won’t Finish. National Week of Action on School Pushout October 11-17, 2010 Push Back for Dignity and pushback.org

48

49 What’s the Right Word?

50 1.TeamChild works to keep youth out of the juvenile justice system by meeting their needs in the community. 2.We believe that all children have the potential to succeed regardless of their past. 3.We believe that kids need second chances to learn from their mistakes and change.

51 1.TeamChild works to keep youth out of the juvenile justice system by meeting their needs in the community. 2.We believe that all children have the potential to succeed regardless of their past. 3.We believe that kids need second chances to learn from their mistakes and change.

52 While a child’s involvement in the juvenile justice system may lead some to believe that they are “bad kids,” many of these children are victims themselves.

53 Juvenile court involvement often leads to labeling of young people.

54 TeamChild is committed to minimizing the negative impact of juvenile justice involvement.

55 Page 55 What comes to mind when you see the word "juvenile?" Please write a few words or phrases. Negative Behavior/Connotations Positive/Neutral Connotations What comes to mind when you see the word “youth?” Please write a few words or phrases. “Juvenile” vs. “Youth”

56 Page 56 Juvenile Youth “Juvenile” vs. “Youth” - Associations

57 Language: Avoid “youth” and “young people” where feasible – they’re generic, and can cover anybody from about age 12 – 28. Specific language, such as “children and teens,” is more effective and clearer. Sidebar: General Advice

58 Language: When talking about the rehabilitative services, treatment, or supervision kids should receive, be sure to use adjectives like “rigorous,” “required” or “mandatory.” This satisfies the public’s desire to balance getting tough with rehabilitation. What Polling Tells Us

59 Core Message Value Make your audience nod in agreement The Message Box Overcome the Barrier What you say when your audience says, “Yeah, but …” (But don’t repeat their barrier message! Just address it.) Ask What one specific thing do you want them to do? (Is it in the audience’s comfort zone?) Vision Answer to “So what?”This is what the world will look like if your audience does what you’re asking.

60 Use DNA tests to stop killing innocent people. Value Innocent people should not be sentenced to die. Message Box Overcome the Barrier More than 100 have been, since Ask Provide DNA testing to everyone convicted of a capital crime. Vision Then our justice system will be fairer … and we won’t kill innocent people.

61 Improving teens’ lives Vision Problem: teens in justice system don’t get treatment for drugs and alcohol. Solution: more treatment, better treatment, beyond treatment. Reclaiming Futures is making change happen. It works with systems, communities, families and youth to build positive recovery networks. What’s Happening Locally: We are one of 29 sites in U.S. Backing it Up: Strong results SOURCE: Urban Institute and Univ. of Chicago Chapin Hall Center for Children Pilot sites report improvements in: 1)juvenile justice 2)Drug and alcohol treatment 3)Agency communication, cooperation 4)Family involvement 5)Teens involved in positive activities In our community: Who’s involved Teens we’ve targeted Status: Where we’re at Goals (by when) Our action plan What it is: A proven model for reform Elements of model: Screening/assessment; care plan; treatment imprvemnt, community involvement= building Individualized recovery networks. Team approach: judges, probation officers, treatment providers, community members. Reclaiming Futures Dec. 7, 2010

62 Giving youth a voice in their future. Value We shouldn’t throw people away when they’re not even adults yet. A TeamChild Message Box: Sample Overcome the Barrier Thousands of teens and children cycle in and out of the justice system without getting their underlying needs met. We do that by … x, y, and z. Results Independent evaluations show that our legal representation delivers positive outcomes for youth by enhancing a youth's access to necessary community based services; helps keeps kids from committing new crimes; and saves taxpayers money. Vision Answer to “So what?” – We help kids learn from their mistakes and become positive members of society What’s Happening Here’s what we’re doing now …

63 What’s Your “Ask”?

64 Handling Interviews/Questions Photo: behemothingbehemothing

65 Tough Questions Every question is an opportunity to state your message

66 Tough Questions “I think I see where you’re going with this. But it looks different to us. Here’s why …”

67 Bridging “What I think is important for everyone to know …”

68 Bridging A Bridging “Hero” from Lenovo

69 Pivot Phrases I can’t tell you that. What I can tell you is…. Well, the REAL issue is….. That brings me back to my most important point….. The most important point to remember is….. Let’s go back to the point you need to keep in mind…. As I stated earlier….. Well, Joe’s story (or tragedy) is very tragic/compelling, but it’s just not typical. Let me tell you a more typical story. [end up with policy solution.]

70 Tough Questions = Easy Ones “So you’re saying we should let kiddie criminals go scot-free?”

71 Tough Questions = Easy Ones “Tell me how kids & communities can be safe if we follow your plan.”

72 Tough Questions = Easy Ones “Good kids shouldn’t pay the price just to mainstream kids who can’t behave in the classroom.”

73 Tough Questions = Easy Ones “Tell me how your approach will keep classrooms safe and focused on learning.”

74 What if You Don’t Know the Answer? Print/phone interview - say you don’t know and get them the information ASAP

75 What if You Don’t Know the Answer? “That’s unclear, Peter, but what I can tell you is …”

76 …Don’t Know the Specific Number? “That the number has been growing since …”

77 What If You Goof and You Know It?

78 Assignment Photo: StuRap, under Creative CommonsStuRap,Creative Commons 1. If you were to introduce the Appleseed video to a room of skeptical school administrators, what common value/emotion would you try to appeal to? (This is NOT about what facts you’d use …) 2. What audience would it not work for, and why?

79 Benjamin Chambers Communications Specialist National Juvenile Justice Network (202) x556


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