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Past tenses For ECCE-level practice see Oxford Practice Grammar Intermediate Grammar from Oxford.

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Presentation on theme: "Past tenses For ECCE-level practice see Oxford Practice Grammar Intermediate Grammar from Oxford."— Presentation transcript:

1 Past tenses For ECCE-level practice see Oxford Practice Grammar Intermediate Grammar from Oxford

2 Find examples of past tense forms Find examples of past tense forms “ There’s a little fishing village where we used to spend our vacations when I was little. The cottage had a lovely view of the sea. My brother and I would get up early every morning and run down to the harbor to watch the fishermen unloading their catch. They were always very busy. Often, one fishing boat was going out while another one was coming in. We stopped going there when we grew older, but I still think about it from time to time.” Oxford Practice Grammar For ECCE-level practice see

3 Examples of past tense forms “ There’s a little fishing village where we used to spend our vacations when I was little. The cottage had a lovely view of the sea. My brother and I would get up early every morning and run down to the harbor to watch the fishermen unloading their catch. They were always very busy. Often, one fishing boat was going out while another one was coming in. We stopped going there when we grew older, but I still think about it from time to time.” Oxford Practice Grammar For ECCE-level practice see

4 Affirmative: Negative: Questions: Spelling rules for affirmative Infinitive ending -e: add ___. Infinitive ending consonant + vowel + consonant: ______________ and add -ed. Infinitive ending consonant + -y: _______________ and add -ed. past simple: form (regular verbs) infinitive + -ed Oxford Practice Grammar For ECCE-level practice see did not (didn’t) + infinitive without to Did + subject + infinitive without to

5 past simple: form (regular verbs) Affirmative: Negative: Questions: Spelling rules for affirmative Infinitive ending -e: add -d. Infinitive ending consonant + vowel + consonant: double the final consonant and add -ed. Infinitive ending consonant + -y: change the -y to an -i and add -ed. Oxford Practice Grammar For ECCE-level practice see infinitive + -ed Did not (didn’t) + infinitive without to Did + subject + infinitive without to

6 past simple: form (irregular verbs) Negatives and questions are formed in the same way as for regular verbs. In the affirmative, many forms are irregular and must be learned individually, e.g., go > went, buy > bought. Oxford Practice Grammar For ECCE-level practice see What did you do over the weekend? I went to the movies, but I didn’t see a film. I met a friend and we went for coffee.

7 past simple: use to talk about past states or completed actions, often with a past-time expression such as last to talk about past habits or routines, often with an adverb of frequency “Did you eat all that pizza?” “He walked five miles every day.” Oxford Practice Grammar For ECCE-level practice see

8 used to and would used to and would are followed by infinitive without to. both can be used to describe repeated past actions and routines, in a similar way to the past simple When I was younger, people used to / would knit all their own sweaters. Now most people buy them. Oxford Practice Grammar For ECCE-level practice see

9 used to and would “My mother used to be an actress. She gave it up when she married my dad.” “Grandpa was very superstitious. He would never open an umbrella indoors.” used to emphasizes a routine that no longer takes place would describes typical past behavior ___________ can describe situations and states in the past. We can’t use __________ in this way. Oxford Practice Grammar For ECCE-level practice see Used to would

10 past continuous: form Affirmative: Negative: Questions: Oxford Practice Grammar For ECCE-level practice see Was / were + -ing Was / were + not (wasn’t / weren’t) + -ing Was / were + subject + -ing Where were you going when I saw you earlier? I wasn’t going anywhere nice. I was visiting a friend in the hospital.

11 past continuous: use to talk about a continuous past situation in progress at a particular time in the past to talk about a background to a second situation or event (when the past simple is used in parallel). “At two o’clock today, I was having lunch with Molly.” “We weren’t sitting by the window when it broke.” “While I was waiting for you, I finished the crossword puzzle.” We can use as, when and _______ to introduce a longer background action. Oxford Practice Grammar For ECCE-level practice see while

12 past continuous and past simple: use two past simple verbs can be used to refer to one action that follows another Compare: “John looked at me when I called his name.” (= John looked after I called him.) “John was looking at at me when I called his name.” (= John started looking before I called him.) The ___________ is not used with stative verbs such as be or know. Oxford Practice Grammar For ECCE-level practice see past continuous

13 Correct or incorrect? Sarah was listening to some loud music when I got in. I could hear it from the next street! As I was waiting for my interview, I got more and more nervous. When we lived near the sea, we went swimming every day. My parents would be in a band together, but that was a long time ago. Oxford Practice Grammar For ECCE-level practice see  

14 Corrected As I was waiting for my interview, I got more and more nervous. My parents were in a band together, but that was a long time ago. Oxford Practice Grammar For ECCE-level practice see

15 Find examples of perfect tense forms Find examples of perfect tense forms “ I’ve been in my current job for nearly five years. That’s really a long time at this company. They tend to give you long-service awards if you’ve been working here for as little as ten years! Things have changed a lot since my grandfather’s day. By the time he retired, he’d been working for the same company for forty years and had never felt the need to look for other employment that entire time.” Oxford Practice Grammar For ECCE-level practice see

16 Examples of perfect tense forms “ I’ve been in my current job for nearly five years. That’s really a long time at this company. They tend to give you long-service awards if you’ve been working here for as little as ten years! Things have changed a lot since my grandfather’s day. By the time he retired, he’d been working for the same company for forty years and had never felt the need to look for other employment that entire time.” Oxford Practice Grammar For ECCE-level practice see

17 present perfect simple: form Affirmative: Negative: Questions: The past participle form of regular verbs is often the same as the past simple form. Irregular forms must be learned individually, e.g., see > saw > ______, eat > ate > ______. Oxford Practice Grammar For ECCE-level practice see Have / has (‘ve / ‘s) + past participle Have / has + not (haven’t / hasn’t) + past participle Have / has + subject + past participle seeneaten

18 present perfect simple: use to talk about past actions or states that have a result in the present, or which have happened recently Someone’s broken the vase. Oxford Practice Grammar For ECCE-level practice see

19 present perfect simple: use to talk about life experiences, often with ever or never Oxford Practice Grammar For ECCE-level practice see Have you ever done bungee jumping? No, I’ve never wanted to do that. I’ve tried paragliding though.

20 present perfect simple: use with since or for, to describe a period of time that has passed “I’ve had this computer since last year.” “We haven’t lived in this town for very long.” We use ______ + a period of time and ______ + a specific point in time. Oxford Practice Grammar For ECCE-level practice see for since

21 present perfect and past simple for can be used after the past simple or present perfect simple; since is not used after the past simple ago is used with the past simple “He lived in France for a few years in the 1990s.” “He lived in France a few years ago.” NOT “He lived in France since 2008.” Oxford Practice Grammar For ECCE-level practice see

22 present perfect and past simple With the present perfect simple, we can use: “unfinished” time expressions such as so far, and until now other time expressions such as still, already, and yet Oxford Practice Grammar For ECCE-level practice see

23 present perfect continuous: form Affirmative: Negative: Questions: Oxford Practice Grammar For ECCE-level practice see Have / has (‘ve / ‘s) been + ing form Have / has (‘ve / ‘s) not been + ing form Have / has + subject + been + ing form I’ve been washing dishes all morning, and I’m still not finished!

24 present perfect continuous: use to talk about an action that started in the past and continues up to the present to give a reason for a present situation with for and since to talk about how long something has been happening for “The situation has been getting worse, and shows no signs of improvement.” “I’m cold because I’ve been working in the basement.” “It has been snowing for ten hours / since last night.” Oxford Practice Grammar For ECCE-level practice see

25 Correct or incorrect? After our argument, Tina didn’t speak to me for ages. I saved 250 dollars towards my new bike so far. I only need another $50. She has been working here since just before Thanksgiving, 2005. I saw Paul Taylor recently. He didn’t change much since we last saw him. Oxford Practice Grammar For ECCE-level practice see  

26 Corrected. I have saved 250 dollars towards my new bike so far. I only need another $50. I saw Paul Taylor recently. He hasn’t changed much since we last saw him. Oxford Practice Grammar For ECCE-level practice see

27 past perfect simple: form Affirmative: Negative: Questions: Oxford Practice Grammar For ECCE-level practice see Had (‘d) + past participle Had not (hadn’t) + past participle Had + subject + past participle Had you seen or heard anything suspicious before the night in question? No, we’d always thought this was such a safe area. There hadn’t been any burglaries before this happened.

28 past perfect simple: use to talk about an earlier past, before another time period or action after verbs of thinking and saying with expressions such as when, as soon as, by the time “She was worried because Jo hadn’t called all day.” “He realized that he had forgotten to pack his pajamas.” “By the time I had finished reviewing everything, it was midnight.” Oxford Practice Grammar For ECCE-level practice see

29 past perfect continuous: form Affirmative: Negative: Questions: I was at school when I suddenly felt dizzy and fainted. In fact, I hadn’t been feeling very well earlier because I’d been playing volleyball all morning. Oxford Practice Grammar For ECCE-level practice see Had (‘d) + been + -ing Had not (hadn’t) + been + -ing Had + subject + been + -ing

30 past perfect continuous: use to describe a past action occurring before something else happened to explain a past situation by describing what was happening beforehand “Last week, Tim returned from Madrid, where he had been studying Spanish.” “Ryan’s mother wasn’t pleased that he had been playing football in the mud and rain.” Remember that we can’t use stative verbs such as be and know with a __________ form. Oxford Practice Grammar For ECCE-level practice see continuous

31 Select the correct sentence AI’m sick of paint! I’ve decorated the living room all morning. BI’m sick of paint! I’ve been decorating the living room all morning. ALeo started his novel in May last year, and by the time we met next, he had been writing it. BLeo started his novel in May last year, and by the time we met next, he had written it. Oxford Practice Grammar For ECCE-level practice see


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