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Like Riding a Bike: Neuroscience in Prevention, Treatment and Recovery Heather Harlan, Phoenix Programs, Inc. Certified Reciprocal Prevention Specialist.

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Presentation on theme: "Like Riding a Bike: Neuroscience in Prevention, Treatment and Recovery Heather Harlan, Phoenix Programs, Inc. Certified Reciprocal Prevention Specialist."— Presentation transcript:

1 Like Riding a Bike: Neuroscience in Prevention, Treatment and Recovery Heather Harlan, Phoenix Programs, Inc. Certified Reciprocal Prevention Specialist Carrie McKinley, University of Missouri Cognitive Neuroscience Research/Center for Translational Neuroscience Missouri Department of Mental Health Spring Training Institute Tan-Tara, Lake of the Ozarks Thursday, May30, 2013

2 Learning Objectives Why adolescent brains are more vulnerable to addiction How substance use/abuse disrupts acquisition of skill sets necessary for adult function How evidence-based prevention/treatment relates to teen brains and protective factors for substance use/abuse

3 What do prevention, treatment and recovery have in common? 3 ? ? ? ? ?

4 Of course!!!!!!!!!! 4 THAT makes sense!

5 Substance use disorders as well as prevention, treatment and recovery 5 ALL made possible through reinforcers.

6 “Neuroscience for Dummies”—me Reward pathways= Roads in your brain More use strengthens pathways 6

7 Ages 5 20 Blue represents maturing areas of the brain Blue represents maturing portion of the brain. 7 Human brain growing well in the mid-20’s

8 90% of addictions begin during adolescence. Dr. Michael Dennis Chestnut Health Systems Illustration source: NIDA

9 Age of first use matters Youth who begin drinking before age 15 are 4-5 times more likely to become alcohol dependent than those who wait until they are PIRE (Pacific Institute on Research and Development) 9

10 We know Immature brains are more at risk. BUT...

11 What’s happening neurologically?

12 Think of the immature human brain as someone who is deciding where to build roads.

13 Lights in the distance draw us on. “Where should I go?” “What actions/behaviors are advantageous to me?” A chemical reward in the brain tells us what actions/behaviors we should repeat and learn.

14 Ordinary rewards we receive over and over teach us how to cope with life. Like small lights on the dark horizon: Hungry-----eat Thirsty------drink Tired companionship Sad find comfort Better grades------study Bored rewarding pastimes Broke work Energy------exercise Stressed----relaxation

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16 Those repeated behaviors become our super highway reward pathways.

17 When a young human brain experiences artificial rewards from alcohol or other drugs...

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19 It sets a youth on a different neurological path. How can you “un-experience” a strong chemical reward you did nothing to receive except to use/drink? How can you “un-see” a bright flashing light?

20 Ordinary “rewards” can’t effectively compete.

21 This creates a high risk for a neurological super highway to using/ drinking behavior— substance use/ abuse/ dependency.

22 Adolescents Higher risk during transitions – Change in schools – Significant losses – Shift in family situation Puberty itself is a transition Stress—working to LEARN new routines It’s about the brain 22

23 Haven’t developed other coping skills. Don’t know it won’t last forever Insufficient “roads in their brains” to feel OK It’s all about here and now 23

24 Youth with mental illness at higher risk % of youth who meet criteria for substance use disorder, also have a clinical, co-occurring mental health diagnosis. --- SAMHSA

25 This is what makes the adolescent human brain so vulnerable to addictive chemicals.

26 Skill SETS Adolescents need to acquire skill sets to be successful.

27 Uh,what’s a skill set?

28 When I think of my brain There’s a lot at stake So I’m gonna learn how To make a good brain great. Please repeat this with me :

29 Now, please, repeat the little ditty from memory.

30 Now, please stand add clapping pattern I will teach you with a with a partner.

31 Now, please switch partners.

32 Final time, everyone listen as we recite the verse and clap and say it together.

33 Experience of a SKILL SET First read the verse Memorized it Learned clapping pattern Leaned to say it with a partner while clapping Learned to accommodate different partners Learned to listen and say it all together in unison.

34 Neurons fired together Are Wired together. 34

35 Examples of other SKILL SETS Getting a job Knowing where to look Filling out applications Creating a resume Performing well in interview

36 Examples of other SKILL SETS KEEPING a job: Getting to work on time Getting along with co-workers Using time wisely Dealing with “a boss.”

37 Examples of other SKILL SETS Sports--practice Music--practice

38 Skill set Neurons fired together are wired together.

39 Prevention, treatment and recovery: All depend on reward pathways that lead to acquisition of skill sets:

40 Prevention, treatment and recovery: All depend on reward pathways that lead to acquisition of skill sets: Prevention: sufficient opportunities to learn coping skills to succeed and enjoy life.

41 Prevention, treatment and recovery: All depend on reward pathways that lead to acquisition of skill sets: Prevention: sufficient opportunities to learn coping skills to succeed and enjoy life. Treatment: strategic and extensive planning to avoid the former “artificial rewards” while of using while creating new reward pathways to pro-social behaviors and coping skills. (not just STOP)

42 Prevention, treatment and recovery: All depend on reward pathways that lead to acquisition of skill sets: Prevention: sufficient opportunities to learn coping skills to succeed and enjoy life. Treatment: strategic and extensive planning to avoid the former “artificial rewards” while of using while creating new reward pathway to pro-social behaviors and coping skills. (not just STOP) Recovery: taking time to practice and strengthen reward pathways to successfully compete with former artificial rewards.

43 Neuroscience of Prevention, treatment and recovery: Like riding a bicycle.

44 Sooooooooooooooo....? How does evidence-based prevention relates to teen brains and protective factors for substance use/abuse?

45 What are some evidence-based prevention or treatment efforts in your community? Discussion: What is happening to protect or develop brains using those interventions?

46 Neuroscience of Prevention, treatment and recovery: Like riding a bicycle.

47 Phoenix Programs, Inc. Know us (I do a majority of posts) “Like us” Follow us. So you can become a member of the informed Community

48 Speaker wishes to acknowledge: Carrie McKinley, co-presenter Phoenix Programs, Inc. MO Department of Mental Health Preventionists and treatment counselors in MO and IL who have generously shared their wisdom and experience.

49 Questions?

50 Thank you for your kind attention and generous participation.

51 For individuals. For families. For over 35 years. Copy of this presentation available on request A New Perspective in Prevention, Treatment and Recovery. Heather Harlan Certified Reciprocal Prevention Specialist Phoenix Programs, Inc x 2142


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