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Put a bounce in your teaching

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1 Put a bounce in your teaching
Anna Cole

2 "Put a bounce in your teaching" Anna Cole 2014

3 Skill sets and methodologies
1 Talent vs. effort - the Pygmalion effect 2 Training your brain - repetition 3 The challenge factor and flow theory 4 Growth vs. fixed mindset 5 The Feedback factor 6 The needs-focused approach "Put a bounce in your teaching" Anna Cole 2014

4 "Put a bounce in your teaching" Anna Cole 2014
I’m too old to learn. I don’t have a good memory. What’s the use? I can’t do this. I’m going to fail. Languages aren’t my thing. I don’t have a brain for languages. There’s not much hope for me on this course. I’m not a natural in the classroom. I’m not a gifted teacher. I’m getting too old for this. I’m not a techie person, this is not part of my job role. I’m burnt out. "Put a bounce in your teaching" Anna Cole 2014

5 “It took me 19 years to become an overnight success” Luciano Pavarotti
"Put a bounce in your teaching" Anna Cole 2014

6 The Polgar family and the practice theory of expertise
"Put a bounce in your teaching" Anna Cole 2014

7 "Put a bounce in your teaching" Anna Cole 2014
we are all talented and practice is more important than talent anybody can achieve the same results with opportunity and dedication good teachers, like good language learners, are made, not born. "Put a bounce in your teaching" Anna Cole 2014

8 talent vs. effort quantity of practice
Dr. K Anders Ericsson - West Berlin Music Academy at the age of 20…. 10,000 top soloists 6,000 play in top orchestras 4,000 music teachers "Put a bounce in your teaching" Anna Cole 2014

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purposeful practice A1 – GLHs A2 – GLHs B1 – GLHs B2 – GLHs C1 – GLHs C2 – GLHs "Put a bounce in your teaching" Anna Cole 2014

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Applying the 10,000 hour rule Scenario 1: 4 hours a week 172 hours 58 years to become fluent. Scenario 2: 3 hours a week 139 hours 71 years to become fluent. Scenario 3: Total immersion 5840 hours 2 years "Put a bounce in your teaching" Anna Cole 2014

11 Professional development circles
"Put a bounce in your teaching" Anna Cole 2014

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increase the intensity of each learning hour help learners increase their language input outside the classroom question your position on the continuum of professional development – experience without deep concentration does not translate into progress "Put a bounce in your teaching" Anna Cole 2014

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The Pygmalion effect A self-fulfilling prophecy, whereby the greater the expectation placed upon people, the better they perform. Pygmalion serialized November 1914" by Everybody's Magazine - Brown University, Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons - "Put a bounce in your teaching" Anna Cole 2014

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have massive expectations for all your students - label all the class your top students give frequent and early feedback that students can do well offer equal opportunities for participation – include the quieter ones start each class with a clean sheet "Put a bounce in your teaching" Anna Cole 2014

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2. Training your brain "Put a bounce in your teaching" Anna Cole 2014

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believe students can learn at any age help students concentrate and fight off distractions. talk explicitly about brain training with your students "Put a bounce in your teaching" Anna Cole 2014

17 repetition and automaticity
"Put a bounce in your teaching" Anna Cole 2014

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good body language improves communication high quality practice gives access to pattern recognition and speeds up the language process choose knowledge and skills that are worth learning "Put a bounce in your teaching" Anna Cole 2014

20 "Put a bounce in your teaching" Anna Cole 2014
3. The Challenge factor Set realistic performance goals and help students achieve them by encouraging them to set their own reasonable goals. Design assignments that are appropriately challenging in view of the experience and aptitude of the class. making students take tests or generate answers, even before they have been taught the material Insist on a demanding classroom climate/expectations. 4. Have strong behaviour/classroom management 5. Have firm beliefs about why teachers adopt certain practices. Success and achievement – deep long-lasting happiness comes from overcoming a challenge. Range of strategies that help students achieve that lightbulb moment not just working at the appropriate level – earlier given more chance students will buy into the lesson Move in the zone - scaffolding – peer-support, teaching students way to solve their own problems, checklists and rubrics. power of belief – if you “know” you’re going to win, even against all the odds, you will perform better. Practice must be purposeful, otherwise it is useless. It must ‘overload’ the current systems in order to cause improvements. It must overload the current systems in order to cause improvements. Stretching and being stretched in practice is fundamental to development. The way to succeed is to concentrate with considerable, specific and sustained effort on what you can’t do well. Most people concentrate on things that they can do effortlessly. Purposeful practice is about striving for what is just out of reach – the zone of proximal development – and not quite making it. It is about grappling with tasks beyond the current limitations and falling short again and again. Excellence is about stepping outside the comfort zone, training with a spirit of endeavor and accepting the inevitability of trials and tribulations. Progress is built, in effect, upon the foundations of necessary failure. This is the essential paradox of expert performance. In 1956, Benjamin Bloom headed a group of educational psychologists who developed a classification of levels of intellectual behavior important in learning. During the 1990's a new group of cognitive psychologists, lead by Lorin Anderson (a former student of Bloom), updated the taxonomy to reflect relevance to 21st century work. The two graphics show the revised and original Taxonomy. Remembering: can the student recall or remember the information?define, duplicate, list, memorize, recall, repeat, reproduce stateUnderstanding: can the student explain ideas or concepts?classify, describe, discuss, explain, identify, locate, recognize, report, select, translate, paraphraseApplying: can the student use the information in a new way?choose, demonstrate, dramatize, employ, illustrate, interpret, operate, schedule, sketch, solve, use, write.Analyzing: can the student distinguish between the different parts?appraise, compare, contrast, criticize, differentiate, discriminate, distinguish, examine, experiment, question, test.Evaluating: can the student justify a stand or decision?appraise, argue, defend, judge, select, support, value, evaluateCreating: can the student create new product or point of view?assemble, construct, create, design, develop, formulate, write. Concepts or skills in the form of a question (replaces the objective). Organizes and sets the focus of the lesson. A tool to help teachers to gather evidence of learning. ASK YOURSELF… What is the intended goal of the lesson? What do I expect my students to know by the conclusion of the HIGH ORDER THINKING QUESTIONS… Questions that are embedded into the lesson at certain points during instruction. Provide opportunities for students to be challenged. May be used to determine direction of instruction Present your students with at least 3 high order thinking questions per lesson. This is “proof” that you are presenting your students with challenging questions and meeting the needs of your advanced learners! Level 5 What criteria would you use to assess……. How would you determine… How could you verify…. What information would you use….. What data was used to evaluate… Level 6 How would you generate a plan to…. What facts can you gather…… How would you explain the reason… What alternative would you suggest for….. What would happen if… EQUATION: Question Stem + What you want them to know ___________________________ = High Order Thinking Question EXAMPLE: How would you improve + your muscular endurance to become a better football player? _______________________________ = How would you improve your muscular endurance to become a better football player? (creating) Why Ask Questions? Some possible reasons are: To encourage learners to talk constructively and on-task To signal an interest in hearing what learners feel and think To stimulate interest and awaken curiosity To encourage a problem-solving approach to thinking and learning To help learners externalize and verbalize knowledge learning To encourage thinking aloud and exploratory approaches to tasks To help learners to learn from each other To monitor learning To deepen learners' thinking level and increase their ability to conceptualize Questions fall under two main categories: Yes/No questions Wh-questions Pyramid plenary From the resource collection The perfect plenary in pyramid form a simple way of checking students' understanding of any topic, at any level.  "Put a bounce in your teaching" Anna Cole 2014

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risk-taking "Put a bounce in your teaching" Anna Cole 2014

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expose learners to stories that portray how others have succeeded or overcome adversity provide opportunities for students to take risks; take their own initiative to do things accept our own setbacks as formative struggles not summative failures. "Put a bounce in your teaching" Anna Cole 2014

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The flow theory By Oliverbeatson (w:File:Challenge vs skill.jpg) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons "Put a bounce in your teaching" Anna Cole 2014

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evaluate flow in the classroom – why does it happen, when does it happen? take control over how much flow we experience by increasing our skills, working on new challenges or both. "Put a bounce in your teaching" Anna Cole 2014

25 4. fixed vs. growth mind-set
Fixed mindset: Intelligence and talent -fixed Innate talent creates success Effort will not make a difference You either get it or you don’t Growth mindset: Intelligence can be developed Brains and talent are just the starting point Enjoy effort and process of learning You can always grow and learn "Put a bounce in your teaching" Anna Cole 2014

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What do they say? FIXED MINDSET GROWTH MINDSET A MISTAKE… FAILURE IS EFFORT… SUCCESS OF OTHERS… The RESULT of this mindset is… "Put a bounce in your teaching" Anna Cole 2014

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FIXED MINDSET GROWTH MINDSET A MISTAKE… makes me lose confidence shows me where I need to put more work in FAILURE… is humiliating means I haven’t reached my full potential EFFORT… isn’t necessary if you’re smart  you get out what you put in SUCCESS OF OTHERS…  if you succeed, I fail is a source of inspiration  RESULT… achieve less than my full potential reach ever higher levels of potential  "Put a bounce in your teaching" Anna Cole 2014

28 be specific and informative with your praise:
model, teach and reinforce the growth mindset: praise effort not intelligence be specific and informative with your praise: You worked hard at improving your spelling I liked the way you contributed today to the class discussion I noticed you paid good attention in the debate I see that you’ve been practicing the vocabulary we are working on; what a great improvement! Your focus on improving your writing has really made a positive difference When you put in the effort, it really shows in your marks. Keep practising! focus on underperforming students and diagnose and correct what is going wrong in their learning process. "Put a bounce in your teaching" Anna Cole 2014

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5. the feedback factor "Put a bounce in your teaching" Anna Cole 2014

30 increasing learners' ‘goal-orientedness'
Alice: Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here? The Cat: That depends a good deal on where you want to get to Alice: I don’t much care where. The Cat: Then it doesn’t much matter which way you go. Alice: …so long as I get somewhere. The Cat: Oh, you’re sure to do that, if only you walk long enough. "Put a bounce in your teaching" Anna Cole 2014

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critical thinking Penthouse suite What would you like to change? What does this tell you about how you learn? Ground floors Did you do your work like other students? What examples can you find…? Basement What can you say about…? What is…? "Put a bounce in your teaching" Anna Cole 2014

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the ultimate goal is to enable students to give feedback to themselves feedback is most effective if it addresses a performance goal train students to give peer feedback (give them rubrics for assessment, checklists, good and not so good models etc.) "Put a bounce in your teaching" Anna Cole 2014

33 6. The needs-focused approach
"Put a bounce in your teaching" Anna Cole 2014

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success achievement praise / feedback choice support humour community creativity routines relevant relationships active "Put a bounce in your teaching" Anna Cole 2014

35 empowerment sense of belonging fun
"Put a bounce in your teaching" Anna Cole 2014

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a sense of belonging "Put a bounce in your teaching" Anna Cole 2014

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share values, experiences and aspirations to establish emotional ties challenge, but nurture "Put a bounce in your teaching" Anna Cole 2014

38 Skill sets and methodologies
1 Talent vs. effort - the Pygmalion effect 2 Training your brain - repetition 3 The challenge factor and flow theory 4 Growth vs. fixed mindset 5 The Feedback factor 6 The Needs Focused approach "Put a bounce in your teaching" Anna Cole 2014

39 "Put a bounce in your teaching" Anna Cole 2014
“There are three things to remember about education. The first one is motivation. The second one is motivation. The third one is motivation.” –Terrell H. Bell "Put a bounce in your teaching" Anna Cole 2014


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