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US Coast Guard Operational Stress Control What the Stats tell us…. Stress on the Force is Increasing 2.

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Presentation on theme: "US Coast Guard Operational Stress Control What the Stats tell us…. Stress on the Force is Increasing 2."— Presentation transcript:

1

2 US Coast Guard Operational Stress Control

3 What the Stats tell us…. Stress on the Force is Increasing 2

4 OSC Objectives Knowledge:Apply: Understand positive and negative effects of stress The Five Core Leadership Functions (Strengthen, Mitigate, Identify, Treat, and Reintegrate) Understand skills for navigating stress After Action Reviews (AARs) to mitigate stress Replenish resources Understand sources of operational stress Combat Operational Stress First Aid (COSFA) Understand stress zones, impacts of stigma and what leaders can do Stress Continuum (Ready, Reacting, Injured, Ill) Decision Matrix to identify stress reactions, injuries and illnesses Know where and when to get more help when needed Resources 3

5 What We Will Cover Stress Continuum Stress Decision Matrix Combat and OperationalStress First Aid (COSFA) 5 Core Leader Functions 4

6 Where Is the Coastie on the Stress Continuum? READYREADY REACTINGREACTINGINJUREDINJUREDILLILL Good to go Well trained Prepared Fit and focused Cohesive units, ready families Distress or impairment Anxious, irritable, or sad Physical or behavioral changes Mild and temporary More severe or persistent distress or impairment May leave lasting memories, reactions, and expectations Stress injuries that don’t heal without help Symptoms persist, get worse, or initially get better and then return worse Caregiver Responsibility Caregiver Responsibility Individual Responsibility Individual Responsibility Individual, Shipmate, Family Responsibility, Unit Leader Stressor 5

7 6 WEAR AND TEAR INNER CONFLICT Four Sources of Stress Injury LOSS LIFE THREAT 6

8 7 WEAR AND TEAR INNER CONFLICT Four Sources of Stress Injury LOSS LIFE THREAT

9 8 WEAR AND TEAR INNER CONFLICT Four Sources of Stress Injury LOSS LIFE THREAT

10 Core Leader Functions READYREADY REACTINGREACTINGINJUREDINJUREDILLILL 9

11 Chow Strengthen: 1 st Core Leader Function 10 Exercise Rest Social Cohesion Body Personal Grooming Spirit Sports Family Mind 10 Strengthen

12 Core Leader Functions READYREADY REACTINGREACTINGINJUREDINJUREDILLILL 11

13 Chow Strengthen: 1 st Core Leader Function 12 Exercise Rest Social Cohesion Body Personal Grooming Spirit Sports Family Mind 12 Strengthen

14 Strengthen: Building Resilience READY REACTING INJURED ILL Original Orange Zone Boundary 13

15 2514 Mitigate: 2 nd Core Leader Function Replenish Resources

16 Military Operations Change Us 15

17 Identify: 3 rd Core Leader Function Look For Changes in Function or Behavior 16 Identify

18 Identify: Stress Tachometer 17

19 Are there signs of DISTRESS or LOSS OF FUNCTION ? Distress or Loss of Function: Difficulty relaxing and sleeping Loss of interest in social or recreational activities Unusual and excessive fear, worry, or anger Recurrent nightmares or troubling memories Hyperactive startle responses to noises Difficulty performing normal duties Any change from normal personality Green Zone (Ready): Good to Go. Continue to monitor for signs of distress or loss of function in the future if concerned Green Zone (Ready): Good to Go. Continue to monitor for signs of distress or loss of function in the future if concerned SEVERE Distress or Loss of Function: Inability to fall asleep or stay asleep Withdrawal from social or recreational activities Uncharacteristic outbursts of rage or panic Nightmares or memories that increase heart rate Inability to control emotions Serious suicidal or homicidal thoughts Loss of usual concern for moral values PERSISTENT Distress or Loss of Function: Stress problems that last for more than several weeks post-deployment Stress problems that don’t get better over time Stress problems that get worse over time Yellow Zone (Reacting): Ensure adequate sleep & rest Manage home-front stressors Discussions in small units Refer to chaplain or medical if problems worsen Yellow Zone (Reacting): Ensure adequate sleep & rest Manage home-front stressors Discussions in small units Refer to chaplain or medical if problems worsen Orange Zone (Injured): Keep safe and calm Rest & recuperation hrs. Refer to medical or chaplain Mentor back to full duty and function Orange Zone (Injured): Keep safe and calm Rest & recuperation hrs. Refer to medical or chaplain Mentor back to full duty and function Red Zone (Ill): Refer to medical Ensure treatment compliance Mentor back to duty if possible Reintegrate with unit Red Zone (Ill): Refer to medical Ensure treatment compliance Mentor back to duty if possible Reintegrate with unit Is the distress or loss of function SEVERE ? YES Has the distress or loss of function PERSISTED ? Sailor Under Stress Identify: Stress Decision Matrix NO 18

20 Identify: Discussion A boat crewman of yours was exposed to smoke from a burning fiberglass fishing vessel. He has heard that exposure to burning plastic can cause cancer. Although exposed for only a short time, he talked to the doc who reassured him that short term exposures are usually nothing to worry about. He seems anxious, is having trouble sleeping, but he’s still motivated and seems to be getting better.  What stress zone is he in?  What should you do about it? One of your best crew members who used to take the lead with any task, is now staying in the shadows and seems reluctant to engage. His performance has deteriorated markedly, he seems increasingly worn out, says he can’t sleep at night, constantly complains about his wife, and is not getting better.  What stress zone is he in?  What should you do about it? 19

21 Identify: Discussion A Sailor of yours was involved in a diesel fuel spill that saturated on of his trouser legs. He has heard rumors that exposure to fuel can be toxic. Although he changed clothing rapidly and cleaned up with soap and water he was concerned enough to talk to the Safety Officer reassured him that short term exposures are usually nothing to worry about. He seems anxious, is having trouble sleeping, but he’s still motivated and seems to be getting better.  What stress zone is he in?  What should you do about it? One of your best Sailors who used to take the lead with any task, is now staying in the shadows and seems reluctant to engage. His performance has deteriorated markedly, he seems increasingly worn out, says he can’t sleep at night, constantly complains about his wife, and is not getting better.  What stress zone is he in?  What should you do about it? 20

22 Operational Stress Control 21

23 Treat: 4 th Core Leader Function Take Action/Intervene 22 Treat

24 Reintegrate: 5 th Core Leader Function Reality of Reintegration 23 Reintegrate

25 Good Leaders Stop, Look, and Listen 24

26 1: Scenario You’ve noticed lately that one of your best coxswains is just not his usual self. You’ve heard he has family problems and that his girlfriend recently broke up with him. Now he goes off by himself and is reported to be playing video games late into the night, not sleeping, and isolating himself. When asked how he is doing, he says he is fine, but seems irritable and will not make eye contact. You are concerned about this crew member. 25

27 2: Scenario A PSU member, ME1 Smith, has a family with 2 children and completed three extended deployments over a couple of years. The first deployment went well, but by the second deployment the older daughter's grades began to drop and Mom has to go to work to help pay bills. When Dad returns he's often irritable. By the third deployment, the daughter begins failing at school, isolates from her family, and begins having nightmares. The son starts acting out at school. The mother becomes overwhelmed and depressed. When Dad returns he is constantly angry, resorts to yelling and screaming, and completely withdraws from the family. 26

28 3: Scenario BM3 Ramirez completed alcohol treatment a month ago and is preparing to deploy again. His car is about to be repossessed because he can’t make his car payments and his girlfriend dumped him recently. He began drinking again and his performance is deteriorating. BMC Massey is concerned about this crew member. 27

29 4: Scenario MKC Jones has recently been through Operational Stress Control Training and has been “mentoring” one of his young Petty Officers on a stress issue. He has decided that the Petty Officer has PTSD and has been telling other Sailors. MKCM Stewart overhears MKC Jones telling other crew members that the Petty Officer has cracked, and has PTSD. 28

30 5: Scenario An FS2 has just reported aboard your command. At an awards ceremony he receives a Coast Guard Achievement Medal for actions conducted during the Haitian earthquake response. He saved two critically injured civilian children. You also know that despite his best efforts, a third injured child died. While the citation is being read, he starts trembling, breathing heavily, and appears to be zoning out. You are concerned about this shipmate. 29

31 Operational Stress Control 30

32 Ready to Go? 31

33 To Maintain a Ready Force, Leaders Must: READY READY (Green) REACTING (Yellow) INJURED (Orange) ILL (Red) Caregiver Responsibility Caregiver Responsibility Individual Responsibility Individual Responsibility Individual, Shipmate, Family Unit Leader Responsibility, Move Our People toward the GREEN 32

34 33 End of Operational Stress Control


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