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He Toki Ki Te Mahi Implementing and Evaluating Good Practice for Māori Trade Training.

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Presentation on theme: "He Toki Ki Te Mahi Implementing and Evaluating Good Practice for Māori Trade Training."— Presentation transcript:

1 He Toki Ki Te Mahi Implementing and Evaluating Good Practice for Māori Trade Training

2 Building on Māori Success He Toki ki te Rika A collaborative Māori Trade Training initiative designed to build Māori Capability and leadership within the building and infrastructure industries in Canterbury. Initiated by Tā Mark Solomon in 2011 Over 720 enrolments since Collaborative Partnership between iwi, Ngāi tahu, Industry, Hawkins Construction and Training provider, CPIT.

3 He Toki ki te Rika

4 Building on Research and Evaluation He Toki ki te Rika has a cycle of evaluation to feed continuous improvement Apprenticeship up take and success is low Transition to work requires particular support Programme sustainability depends on work based support

5 He Toki ki te Mahi Group Training Scheme established under a shared Trust designed to support He Toki graduates through their apprenticeship Focus on growing both individual and collective Māori capability in the building and infrastructure industries Not only providing a supportive pathway for Māori tauira and whānau but supporting employers to provide a culturally appropriate learning pathway

6 Te Ako Tiketike Māori as successful workplace learners (Kerehoma et al, 2013), Te Ako Tiketike

7 Te Ako Tiketike Model Te Ako Tiketike is primarily an evidenced based theory model. This project aims to articulate what this means in practice, what mechanisms, systems, structures are required to implement this model. (Kerehoma et al, 2013)

8 Ako Teaching and Learning Project This core vision of this kaupapa is to increase the culturally responsive practice (CRP) within NZ industry organisations in order to increase Māori learners success. There are three distinct aspects of this model: Implementation of Te Ako Tiketike Organisation professional development and individualised learning plans Double Loop Learning informing organisational change process Research Component This project seeks to analyse current apprentice support practices for Māori in the workplace, implement Te Ako Tiketike and research experience and outcomes for apprentices. Intervention Component Systems support and guidelines for the Hawkins organisation, employers and sub- contractors for working successfully with Māori apprentices and demonstrate how the model works as a comprehensive organisational framework within the GTS.

9 Double loop learning model Actions Mahia te mahi Outcomes Nga hua New Practices He wananga Revised Perceptions He whakaaro hou Te Ao Tiketike Principles He tikanga whakaaro Double–Loop Learning Active Implementation Whaka Mahia te reo Impact Evaluation Whaka Mahia te reo ( Innovation and systems change Simultaneous focus on organisational learning processes and work based relationships Model of Double Loop Learning for Systems Change: (Adapted from Argyris, 1990; Hargrove, 1990; Macfarlane, 2004)

10 Research and Evaluation Objectives To implement Te Ako Tiketike as a model for success for Māori learners within Hawkins and He Toki ki te mahi GTS Analyse current organisational practices, support systems for apprentices and create supported pathway for He Toki apprentices Support organisational change through professional learning to create a culturally connected workplace that is responsive to the needs of Māori Support Māori leadership within the organisations.

11 What we have found on the journey Needs Analysis Global Map Next Steps

12 Needs Analysis – Example Reflective 360 degree appraisal (Data) Action (Intervention)Aspirational (Aim) Socio/cultural environment Need to address cultural professional learning and development for workers within Hawkins and especially sub- contractors. Complete a best practice framework for subcontractors – perhaps have an induction process for this when the students are placed with them Set PLD date in conjunction with the internal launch within Hawkins To reduce resentment within the Hawkins team towards the extra attention students the future of NZ society relies on a strong economic work force). Reducing racial undertone overt behaviors including any abusive statements – Professional Learning Element  Establish core ideas to be communicated and spread  Establish a shared language  Deficit theorizing  Understanding role of culture  Understanding changing demographics PLD focused around planned implementation – staff believe they have neutral practice (they believe they in a say what you think culture– there is a need to discuss how theory drives all behavior (unconscious or conscious). PLD team could start with PLD identity, “who am I” – a session on colonization, racism and social justice – looking at equity within NZ and the work place. To include PLD over the course of this research project to ensure that staff are given regular opportunities to understand the importance of shifting some entrenched practice. Pastoral Care Issues Some students need drug & alcohol support – this may be outsourced (EAP) as well as with mentor check In and other peer support, coaching work. Students need support with commitment, time management, budgeting skills etc (see below for further information on these particular skill supports). Mentoring Tuakana-teina (peer mentoring, peer learning and role models)Tuakana-teiner Original trades trainees to be involved in mentoring project – in house Hawkins staff and external supervision. Glean interest in who would like to be involved in this process Mentoring project with on site, off site, past trainees – in site operators and outside agencies such as EAP Mentoring focused on understanding different stakeholder needs - Mentoring that will allow students to understand the pressure that site managers go through and it would raise awareness. Young workers have different drivers compared to mature workers. You have to let them know the differences. This is where mentoring that aims to meet student needs while at the same time teaching them about the needs of project managers and how the work that they do knits in tightly with the support of the entire team.

13 WHĀNAU SUPPORT AND ENCOURAGEMENT  Clear difference in attendance, retention, attitude and longevity when whānau and strong family base is closely connected to the workers.  Nature of support provided to whānau to address their needs and realise their aspirations/become training or work ready (referrals/ provision e.g. literacy support, addiction counselling);Emergin g issues impacting whānau readiness to take up training and employment opportunities  Whānau are included in interview process  Whānau are included in individual learning plan  Mentors meet with whānau – build connectedness  Possible whānau create and had  Whānau report and experience of Hawkins – Hawkins extend invite to Hawkins   Front end relationship, include whānau from start, inform them with clear information on what to expect. Build on further in induction rather than at crisis times.  Whānau included in student success  Be conscious of checking relative whānau support early  Where doesn’t exist – factor for it – through other network support groups – He Toki, apprentice network, mentor.  Educate employers on what whānau is/means Global Map - Example

14 TE AKO TIKETIKE FACTORS NEEDS ANALYSIS SUCCESS INDICATORS SHORT TERM GOALS – OCTOBER 2014 INTERVENTION REQUIRED ORGANISATIONAL SUPPORT Socio/cultural environment  Absence of racism policy  Resentment issues/  Negative attitudes – special treatment of He Toki apprentices  Low nos of Maori staff  Need for cultural pd within Hawkins and especially sub-contractors.  Arm staff with knowledge of importance of best practice for now and future generations, the future of NZ society relies on a strong economic work force).  Increase awareness of Hawkins staff/sub contractors. Cultural practice is embedded  Monthly tracking processes of pastoral care intervention  Tracking of numeracy and literacy engagement  Complete a best practice framework for subcontractors  Create an induction process for subcontractors  Clearly reference and communicate expectations on apprentice treatment - sign off process, data collection and management and weekly mentoring and or study sessions.  Staff PD on culture  Organise Mark Katterns to facilitate a PD session in ChCh as Hawkins industry based worker.  Staff understanding on changing demographic landscapes  Staff understanding on need to foster leadership  Staff understanding on career orientation Professional Learning Element  Establish core ideas to be communicated and spread  Establish a shared language  Deficit theorizing  Stereotypical behavior  Understanding role of culture  Understanding changing demographics  To include PLD over the course of this research project to ensure that staff are given regular opportunities to understand the importance of shifting some entrenched practice.  Staff can speak with confidence about how workplace is supporting Māori  Understanding of NT, tikanga etc  Set PLD date in conjunction with the internal launch within Hawkins – organize for core enablers within the organization to be a part of the PLD building capacity within the Hawkins team.  PLD team could start with PLD identity, “who am I” – a session on colonization, racism and social justice – looking at equity within NZ and the work place.  Align with Internal policy taking place in Hawkins. Recommendation For System Support - Example

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