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Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales The Prologue to The Canterbury Tales The Monk The Friar The Merchant The Oxford Cleric.

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Presentation on theme: "Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales The Prologue to The Canterbury Tales The Monk The Friar The Merchant The Oxford Cleric."— Presentation transcript:

1 Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales The Prologue to The Canterbury Tales The Monk The Friar The Merchant The Oxford Cleric

2 Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales The Monk

3 Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales The Monk Characterization –Diction “one of the finest sort/ Who rode the country” ( ) –Suggests he travels often –A monk is religious person who lives away from the world in cloister where he resigns his life to Christ

4 Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales The Monk “His bridle, when he rode, a man might hear Jingling in a whistling wind as clear, Aye, and as loud as does the chapel bell Where my lord Monk was Prior of the cell.” ( ) –Expensive accessories

5 Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales The Monk “The Rule of good St. Benet or St. Maur/ As old and strict he tended to ignore” ( ) –Ignores the rule of proper behavior for a monk

6 Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales The Monk “he spared for no expense” (190) “He was not pale like a tormented soul/ He like a fat swan best, and roasted whole.” ( ) –Pale=inside all day (cloistered) –Ate very well

7 Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales The Monk Purpose of the Diction »Characterizes the Monk as a hypocrite »Not concerned about the welfare of others »Self-centered

8 Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales The Monk Our Reaction –We do not like the Monk

9 Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales The Friar

10 Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales The Friar Characterization –Diction “a wanton one and merry” (206) –Wanton=jolly

11 Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales The Friar “He’d fixed up many a marriage, giving each/ Of his young women what he could afford her.” ( ) –Chaucer implies that the Friar arranges marriages for girlfriends he is tired of

12 Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales The Friar “Sweetly he heard his penitents at shrift/ With pleasant absolution, for a gift.” ( ) –Absolves peoples sins in exchange for gifts Unethical

13 Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales The Friar “His neck was whiter than a lily-flower/ But strong enough to butt a bruiser down.” ( ) –He is stronger than he appears

14 Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales The Friar “He knew the taverns well in every town And every innkeeper and barmaid too Better than lepers, beggars and that crew, For in so eminent a man as he It was not fitting with the dignity Of his position, dealing with a scum Of wretched lepers; nothing good can come Of commerce with such slum-and-gutter dwellers, But only with the rich and victual-sellers.” ( )

15 Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales The Friar Not interested in helping the poor –The poor cannot offer him anything More familiar with the bartenders than the people he should be offering help to.

16 Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales The Friar “He was the finest beggar of his batch, And, for his begging-district, payed a rent; His brethren did no poaching where he went. For though a widow mightn’t have a shoe, So pleasant was his holy-d’ye-do He got his farthing from her just the same Before he left, and so his income came To more than he laid out.” ( )

17 Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales The Friar The Friar has a license to beg Takes money from the poor as well as the rich –Unethical –Remember, the Friar took a vow of poverty

18 Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales The Friar “Of double-worsted was the semi-cope Upon his shoulders, and the swelling fold About him, like a bell about its mould When it is casting, rounded out his dress.” ( ) –Expensive and extravagant clothing –Overweight

19 Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales The Friar Purpose of the Diction –Demonstrates that the Friar is unethical –Uses his position to better himself –Takes advantage of people –Goes against his vows

20 Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales The Friar Our Reaction to the Friar –We do not like him –We should not trust him

21 Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales The Merchant

22 Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales The Merchant Characterization –Diction “There was a Merchant with a forking beard And motley dress; high on his horse he sat, Upon his head a Flemish beaver hat And on his feet daintily buckled boots. He told of his opinions and pursuits In solemn tones…” ( )

23 Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales The Merchant Concerned with appearances and social stature Thinks highly of his opinions Bores others with his commentary

24 Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales The Merchant “This estimable Merchant so had set/ His wits to work, none knew he was in debt” ( ) –False appearances

25 Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales The Merchant Purpose of the Diction »Demonstrates the narcissism of the Merchant »Critics believe that because of the personal description of the Merchant, Chaucer had a particular individual in mind when writing about this character.

26 Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales The Merchant Witty Ending –“To tell the truth I do not know his name” (288) The merchant is so concerned about his social status and with achieving recognition, yet Chaucer cannot remember his name.

27 Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales The Merchant Our Reaction to the Merchant –Not much of an opinion –We laugh at him –He is somewhat forgettable

28 Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales The Oxford Cleric

29 Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales The Oxford Cleric Characterization –Diction “…his horse was thinner than a rake, And he was not too fat, I undertake, But had a hollow look, a sober stare; The thread upon his overcoat was bare. ( ) Fits the stereotype of the poor, starving student

30 Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales The Oxford Cleric “He preferred having twenty books in red And black, of Aristotle’s philosophy, Than costly clothes, fiddle or psaltery.” ( ) –More concerned with learning than with physical appearances

31 Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales The Oxford Cleric “Whatever money from his friends he took He spent on learning or another book And prayed for them most earnestly, returning Thanks to them thus for paying for his learning.” ( )

32 Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales The Oxford Cleric The Cleric repays his debts by praying for those who loaned him money –More spiritual than the Monk or the Friar

33 Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales The Oxford Cleric Purpose of the Diction –Demonstrates the commitment of the Oxford Cleric to his studies –Reminds us of the lack of commitment demonstrated by the Monk and the Friar

34 Geschke/British Literature The Canterbury Tales The Oxford Cleric Our Reaction to the Oxford Cleric –Not much of an opinion –Relatively forgettable character


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