Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Reading.  As you read, ask yourself, “How does Jefferson describe the challenges the colonists faced?”  Analyze text structure and features and explain.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Reading.  As you read, ask yourself, “How does Jefferson describe the challenges the colonists faced?”  Analyze text structure and features and explain."— Presentation transcript:

1 Reading

2  As you read, ask yourself, “How does Jefferson describe the challenges the colonists faced?”  Analyze text structure and features and explain their impact in the meaning of the text.

3  When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature's God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation.

4 Word ContextWorking Definition

5 Word ContextWorking Definition Dissolve

6 Word ContextWorking Definition Dissolve “it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another”

7 Word ContextWorking Definition Dissolve “it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another” To be no longer present

8 Word ContextWorking Definition Declare

9 Word ContextWorking Definition Declare “that they should declare the causes”

10 Word ContextWorking Definition Declare “that they should declare the causes” to state officially or announce clearly

11 Word ContextWorking Definition impel

12 Word ContextWorking Definition impel “which impel them to the separation”

13 Word ContextWorking Definition impel “which impel them to the separation” to force

14  Notice the chunks of information (paragraphs and lists).  How many chunks of information are there?

15  How many chunks are there? There are four (4) major parts to the Declaration.  From what you know of essay structure, what do you predict will be the general structure of the essay?

16  How many chunks are there? There are four (4) major parts to the Declaration.  From what you know of essay structure, what do you predict will be the general structure of the essay?

17  How many chunks are there? There are four (4) major parts to the Declaration.  From what you know of essay structure, what do you predict will be the general structure of the essay? Introduction body conclusion

18  Now, on your copy of the Declaration of Independence, write introduction beside the first paragraph to label it.

19  We need to locate the thesis in the introduction. It is generally the last sentence of the first paragraph and states the purpose of the essay.

20 When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature's God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation.

21  To “declare the causes which impel them to the separation” is the thesis; it is sometimes called the statement of purpose.

22  Now, put the thesis in your own words. Thesis (Central Idea): To “declare the causes which impel them to the separation.”  In other words,

23  Thesis: to “declare the causes which impel them to the separation.”  In other words, the purpose of the Declaration is to explain the reason for separating from Britain and forming their own government

24 Reading

25 Word ContextWorking Definition unalienable

26 Word ContextWorking Definition unalienable that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights

27 Word ContextWorking Definition unalienable that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights Not able to be taken away

28 Word ContextWorking Definition Tyranny

29 Word ContextWorking Definition Tyranny … having in direct object the establishment of an absolute Tyranny over these States.

30 Word ContextWorking Definition Tyranny … having in direct object the establishment of an absolute Tyranny over these States. power that is harsh, unjust, oppressive

31 Word ContextWorking Definition Sufferance

32 Word ContextWorking Definition Sufferance --Such has been the patient sufferance of these Colonies;

33 Word ContextWorking Definition Sufferance --Such has been the patient sufferance of these Colonies; the state or condition of suffering

34 Word ContextWorking Definition Self-evident

35 Word ContextWorking Definition Self-evident “we hold these truths to be self- evident”

36 Word ContextWorking Definition Self-evident “we hold these truths to be self- evident” evident of themselves, without need of evidence or proof; obvious

37  usurpations (n.): usurp (v.) means to seize something without the right to do so; therefore, usurpation, the noun form of usurp, means the act of seizing, or taking, something without the right to do so.  prudence: careful forethought, good judgment

38  Review: Text structure is the way that parts of a text are organized and are related to each other. The Declaration of Independence is expository, with an introduction, body and conclusion.  Introduction: States the purpose-to explain the reason for the Colonies’ separating from Britain and forming their own government.

39  Within the body, Jefferson used problem / solution organization.  What problems does Jefferson identify?  What solution does he propose?

40  Syllogism-a form of deductive reasoning that has three parts: a major premise, a minor premise, and a conclusion.

41  Syllogism-a form of deductive reasoning that has three parts:  a major premise  a minor premise  a conclusion.  A syllogism is valid if its conclusion follows logically from the premises.

42  A syllogism has three parts: major premise, minor premise, and conclusion. EXAMPLE:  Major premise: All humans a mortal.  Minor premise: Jefferson is human.  Conclusion: Jefferson is mortal.

43  Now, as you read with your partner, analyze Jefferson’s argument. What is the syllogism that Jefferson uses in his argument? What foundation does he lay first?  Major premise:  Minor premise:  Conclusion:

44  Now read to identify the three part syllogism. Underline the major premise once, the minor premise twice, and conclusion three with a wavy line. Write major, minor, conclusion in the margin to identify each part.  Major premise:  Minor premise:  Conclusion:

45 CODING-  ? Don’t understand ?/ W-word ?/S- section, sentence, or phrase  / I lost it here and had to go back and reread  circle key transitions (i.e. but, therefore)

46 W orking: 10 minutes  Major premise: underline 1x  Minor premise: underline 2x  Conclusion: underline with a wavy line  ? Don’t understand ?/ W-word ?/S- section, sentence, or phrase  / I lost it here and had to go back and reread  circle key transitions (i.e. but, therefore)

47 Before beginning the syllogism, Jefferson establishes assumptions—truths that are "self-evident" –upon which the entire argument is built:  All men are created equal  They are endowed with the unalienable rights of "Life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.“  These truths cannot be disputed or taken away, since they are "endowed by the Creator.“ Thus, he lays the foundation for his three-part argument that follows.

48 We hold these truths to be self-evident,  that all men are created equal,  that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights,  that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.  --That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed,  --That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness.

49  Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly  all experience hath shewn [has shown], that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed.  But when a long train of abuses and usurpations [usurp-to seize something without right to do so], pursuing invariably the same Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security.--Such has been the patient sufferance of these Colonies; and such is now the necessity which constrains them to alter their former Systems of Government. The history of the present King of Great Britain is a history of repeated injuries and usurpations, all having in direct object the establishment of an absolute Tyranny over these States. To prove this, let Facts be submitted to a candid world.

50  Major premise: "...whenever any form of government becomes destructive to [these rights], it is the right of the people to alter or abolish it, and to institute new government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect [the people's] safety and happiness”(4).  Simply put:  Minor premise:  Conclusion:

51  Major premise:

52  Major premise: "...whenever any form of government becomes destructive to [these rights], it is the right of the people to alter or abolish it, and to institute new government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect [the people's] safety and happiness”(4).  Simply put:

53  Major premise: "...whenever any form of government becomes destructive to [these rights], it is the right of the people to alter or abolish it, and to institute new government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect [the people's] safety and happiness”(4).  Simply put: If a government violates these fundamental rights, then the people have the right to be changed or abolished it.

54  Minor premise: ”The history of the present King of Great Britain is a history of repeated injuries and usurpations, all having in direct object the establishment of an absolute Tyranny over these States.”  In other words, the King of England has violated the rights of the Colonies.

55  Conclusion: “ We, therefore, the Representatives of the united States of America, in General Congress, Assembled, appealing to the Supreme Judge of the world for the rectitude of our intentions, do, in the Name, and by Authority of the good People of these Colonies, solemnly publish and declare, That these United Colonies are, and of Right ought to be Free and Independent States; that they are Absolved [free from responsibility] from all Allegiance to the British Crown, and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain, is and ought to be totally dissolved; and that as Free and Independent States, they have full Power to levy War, conclude Peace, contract Alliances, establish Commerce, and to do all other Acts and Things which Independent States may of right do.

56  Major premise: Governments that violate the fundamental rights of the people ought to be changed or abolished.  Minor premise: The King of England has violated the rights of the Colonies.  Conclusion: Therefore, the united Colonies have the right to dissolve their political ties with Britain and to create a new government.

57 Reading

58  Formulated questions relevant and significant to the topic  Questions are text-based and refer to relevant information from text

59

60


Download ppt "Reading.  As you read, ask yourself, “How does Jefferson describe the challenges the colonists faced?”  Analyze text structure and features and explain."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google