Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

MICHELLE JESKE NIKKI VAN THIEL KRISTIN ROPER. Asset Based Community Development model Focus on assets rather than deficiencies.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "MICHELLE JESKE NIKKI VAN THIEL KRISTIN ROPER. Asset Based Community Development model Focus on assets rather than deficiencies."— Presentation transcript:

1 MICHELLE JESKE NIKKI VAN THIEL KRISTIN ROPER

2 Asset Based Community Development model Focus on assets rather than deficiencies

3

4

5 Outline our plan & process Discuss information sought & information gained Describe methods of organizing information Share lessons learned about our process

6  Interview Denver organizations serving teens = identify & describe assets  Interview DPL staff regarding current services for teens = identify & describe  Interview teens currently utilizing DPL services = identify & describe  Organize information to identify broad themes = harness the assets  Make recommendations based on themes = harness the assets

7  Identified a list of assets  Narrowed list to reasonable number  Developed interview questions  Added DPL staff to assist with interviews  Contacted organizations  Set up interviews  Conducted interviews  Took thorough notes  Discussed interviews with committee  Replaced non-responsive organizations with others

8  Developed list of questions to ask DPL staff via online survey  Combination of fixed-answer questions and open-ended questions  Opened survey to all staff, response optional  Used survey software to organize results  Posted results immediately to internal website

9  Developed list of interview questions  Identified teens: Teen Advisory Boards  Staff facilitators interviewed teens or allowed one of us to interview

10  Basecamp  Google docs  Survey Monkey

11

12  Definition: an interpretive technique that both organizes the data and provides a means to introduce the interpretations of it into certain quantitative methods. (Wikipedia)

13  Many, many ways to code: Google: coding research interviews Qualitative research methods books YouTube videos Wikipedia

14  Identifying themes among open-ended answers  Both broad and narrow categories  Broad categories illuminate trends  Narrow categories preserve interview responses

15  Committee took 2 questions each  Read all interview answers  Made notes on themes = broad categories  Reread answers a second time  Identified narrow categories

16 Question: How do you find teens to participate in your program? Answer from organization: Have a teacher training program, work primarily with schools and youth groups, in juvenile justice systems, Boys & Girls club. Market programs to anywhere youth are. No classes on site. Do one on one education sessions, parents can call to set up. Use traditional pamphlets and fliers, ramping up social media exposure; when contacting teachers, send letters. Best way for youth to contact is ICYC, especially if not program at school. Some youth have initiated sex education for their schools!

17 Have a teacher training program, work primarily with schools and youth groups, in juvenile justice systems, Boys & Girls club. Market programs to anywhere youth are. No classes on site. Do one on one education sessions, parents can call to set up. Use traditional pamphlets and fliers, ramping up social media exposure; when contacting teachers, send letters. Best way for youth to contact is ICYC, especially if not program at school.  Outreach to schools  Outreach to teens  Outreach to parents  Untargeted outreach  Outreach to teens  Outreach to schools  Outreach to teens

18 Have a teacher training program, work primarily with schools and youth groups, in juvenile justice systems, Boys & Girls club. Market programs to anywhere youth are. No classes on site. Do one on one education sessions, parents can call to set up. Use traditional pamphlets and fliers, ramping up social media exposure; when contacting teachers, send letters. Best way for youth to contact is ICYC, especially if not program at school.  Outreach to schools  Outreach to teens juvenile justice system  Outreach to teens  Outreach to parents  Untargeted outreach  Outreach to teens social media  Outreach to schools letters to teachers  Outreach to teens anonymous way to contact

19 Referrals from schools, families, Department of Human Services, Medicaid and others Word of mouth Teens will recruit others for teen groups and school-based programs Self referral – teens can call up and get intake Urban Peak and The Center refer as well AVID is a national organization (out of San Diego) sites internationally: US, Australia, Dept of Defense (schools on military bases?), Japan, Germany, Virgin Islands. DPS has a district director, Gary Cooper who is in charge of the program district-wide. 90% age into it from Brownies, younger Girl Scouts Attract others from outreach programs (don’t do a lot of this) Outreach to youth providers (community agencies, schools, and parents) as well as word of mouth among the youth. We have a nomination/recruiting process through teachers and school leadership. We receive student referrals from traditional schools, as well as from Denver Human Services and Probation Urban Peak has a “no wrong door” policy. They have an outreach department (which does street outreach Monday through Saturday). Some youth find them at the drop-in center at 21 st and Stout (Open Monday-Friday, with breakfast from 8-10 AM – youth can sign up for showers and laundry during that time – and then drop-in time and classes (pregnancy prevention, anger management, etc. in the afternoon). They’ve had up to 110 youth at the center for breakfast (70 this morning!). Word on the street plays a big role in pulling youth in. Some have said they found out about UP through the website. Anyone under 18 can walk into shelter 24-7, which is sometimes the first point of contact. They also receive referrals from Department of Youth Corrections, DHS, Child Welfare, schools, psych hospitals, other homeless providers. Aged into teen program from youth program Outreach programs (partners) recruit girls Learn about it at a Girls, Inc program at their schools Word of mouth Guest speakers at schools, workshops at schools Referrals from partners Teens find them by getting into trouble Word of mouth Outreach at powwows Outreach to schools and neighborhoods Neighborhood apartment complexes Foodbank of the Rockies Social media - facebook and website Neighborhood outreach Word of mouth in community and between families School outreach Former Bridge participants

20 Referrals from schools, families, Department of Human Services, Medicaid and others Word of mouth Teens will recruit others for teen groups and school-based programs Self referral – teens can call up and get intake Urban Peak and The Center refer as well 90% age into it from Brownies, younger Girl Scouts Attract others from outreach programs (don’t do a lot of this) Outreach to youth providers (community agencies, schools, and parents) as well as word of mouth among the youth. We have a nomination/recruiting process through teachers and school leadership. We receive student referrals from traditional schools, as well as from Denver Human Services and Probation Urban Peak has a “no wrong door” policy. They have an outreach department (which does street outreach Monday through Saturday). Some youth find them at the drop-in center at 21 st and Stout (Open Monday-Friday, with breakfast from 8-10 AM – youth can sign up for showers and laundry during that time – and then drop-in time and classes (pregnancy prevention, anger management, etc. in the afternoon). They’ve had up to 110 youth at the center for breakfast (70 this morning!). Word on the street plays a big role in pulling youth in. Some have said they found out about UP through the website. Anyone under 18 can walk into shelter 24-7, which is sometimes the first point of contact. They also receive referrals from Department of Youth Corrections, DHS, Child Welfare, schools, psych hospitals, other homeless providers. Aged into teen program from youth program Outreach programs (partners) recruit girls Learn about it at a Girls, Inc program at their schools Word of mouth Guest speakers at schools, workshops at schools Referrals from partners Teens find them by getting into trouble Word of mouth Outreach at powwows Outreach to schools and neighborhoods Neighborhood apartment complexes Foodbank of the Rockies Social media - facebook and website Neighborhood outreach Word of mouth in community and between families School outreach Former Bridge participants

21 Outreach to parents letters - 1 Outreach to invested adults/organizations presence at community events - 2 -referrals from adults/organizations - 9 Outreach to teens mentoring / one on one - 1 -juvenile justice system - 3 -anonymous way for teens to contact - 1 -word of mouth social media - 4 -website - 4 -application from teen – 3 -aged into program - 4 Outreach to schools workshops for teachers – 1 -workshops/classes for students - 7 -students enroll through school - 5 -referrals/lists from schools - 10 Untargeted outreach - 3 -print materials - 3 -paid or in-kind advertising - 2

22

23

24 Referrals from schools, families, Department of Human Services, Medicaid and others Word of mouth Teens will recruit others for teen groups and school-based programs Self referral – teens can call up and get intake Urban Peak and The Center refer as well AVID is a national organization (out of San Diego) sites internationally: US, Australia, Dept of Defense (schools on military bases?), Japan, Germany, Virgin Islands. DPS has a district director, Gary Cooper who is in charge of the program district-wide. 90% age into it from Brownies, younger Girl Scouts Attract others from outreach programs (don’t do a lot of this) Outreach to youth providers (community agencies, schools, and parents) as well as word of mouth among the youth. We have a nomination/recruiting process through teachers and school leadership. We receive student referrals from traditional schools, as well as from Denver Human Services and Probation Urban Peak has a “no wrong door” policy. They have an outreach department (which does street outreach Monday through Saturday). Some youth find them at the drop-in center at 21 st and Stout (Open Monday-Friday, with breakfast from 8-10 AM – youth can sign up for showers and laundry during that time – and then drop-in time and classes (pregnancy prevention, anger management, etc. in the afternoon). They’ve had up to 110 youth at the center for breakfast (70 this morning!). Word on the street plays a big role in pulling youth in. Some have said they found out about UP through the website. Anyone under 18 can walk into shelter 24-7, which is sometimes the first point of contact. They also receive referrals from Department of Youth Corrections, DHS, Child Welfare, schools, psych hospitals, other homeless providers. Aged into teen program from youth program Outreach programs (partners) recruit girls Learn about it at a Girls, Inc program at their schools Word of mouth Guest speakers at schools, workshops at schools Referrals from partners Teens find them by getting into trouble Word of mouth Outreach at powwows Outreach to schools and neighborhoods Neighborhood apartment complexes Foodbank of the Rockies Social media - facebook and website Neighborhood outreach Word of mouth in community and between families School outreach Former Bridge participants

25

26  Process is Important

27  Use the Power Player

28  Face to Face Interviews are important › Made a connection/built a relationship › Observed first hand what the organizations do › Represented DPL and what we do › Better informed on how we might support the organizations

29  Coding

30  Coding and more Coding › Wanted to cover everything said in the interviews › Wanted to consider the interview as a whole › Key is consistency

31  Long process!

32 We learned: o Challenges of other youth Serving Orgs o DPL is working in a vacuum o Wraparound services are needed o Hard to serve teens without the 3 Cs o We need the Bigwigs o This methodology is amazing!

33  More programs for tweens, and emerging adults (18-25)  Dedicated and separate funding is necessary  Staff training  Jobs and internships for teens  Marketing to teens  Evaluation  Sharing outcomes

34  Co-sponsor a Connector’s Table with DPL  Utilize Denver’s Office of Children’s Affairs  Develop a web-based service locator

35


Download ppt "MICHELLE JESKE NIKKI VAN THIEL KRISTIN ROPER. Asset Based Community Development model Focus on assets rather than deficiencies."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google