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Miriam Horgan Inspectorate Department of Education and Skills

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1 Miriam Horgan Inspectorate Department of Education and Skills
Health and Safety in the Laboratory – some suggestions Chemical Education Conference UCC 22 Oct 2011 Miriam Horgan Inspectorate Department of Education and Skills

2 Miriam Horgan, Department of Education and Skills
Learning Outcomes Legislative background Safety Statement Hazard – definition, types Risk –definition, assessment, control Safe Laboratory – rules Chemical Hazards – storage, labelling, MSDS sheets Circular Letter 14/2011 08/04/2017 Miriam Horgan, Department of Education and Skills

3 Miriam Horgan, Department of Education and Skills
Health and Safety Act 2005 Act - main provisions for securing and improving the safety, health and welfare of people at work Schools – employer BOM or VEC responsibilities may be delegated Duties of employer include procedures needed to ensure that legislative requirements are met carry out risk assessments prepare and implement a safety statement Duties of teachers (employees) include take reasonable care to protect own/others’ safety report hazards to management take account of safety training use PPE 08/04/2017 Miriam Horgan, Department of Education and Skills

4 Miriam Horgan, Department of Education and Skills
Safety Statement Written Details of management of health and safety Based on identification of hazards and risk assessments (section 19 Act) and controls Excerpt from Managing Health and Safety in Post-Primary Schools, Available at 08/04/2017 Miriam Horgan, Department of Education and Skills

5 Miriam Horgan, Department of Education and Skills
Elements of safety statement Excerpt from Managing Health and Safety in Post-Primary Schools, Available at 08/04/2017 Miriam Horgan, Department of Education and Skills

6 Recent Chemical Legislation
Chemicals Act July Chemicals (Amendment) Act December The main purpose of the 2008 and 2010 Acts is to facilitate the enforcement of certain EU Regulations concerning chemicals. These Regulations include the: Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) Regulation (No. 1907/2006) ), Classification, Labelling and Packaging of Substances and Mixtures (CLP) Regulation (No. 1272/2008) 08/04/2017 Miriam Horgan, Department of Education and Skills

7 E.U. Hazard Labelling Symbols
08/04/2017 Miriam Horgan, Department of Education and Skills

8 Miriam Horgan, Department of Education and Skills
Hazards A hazard is anything that has the potential to cause harm to people, property or the environment. material, equipment, work method or practice. situational hazards e.g. obstacle in corridor little threat during class time but may be serious during break time Types of hazards Physical –e.g. slips, trips, hot objects, gas, electrical, fire, falling objects Health –e.g. noise, harmful dust, radiation, unsuitable light Chemical –e.g. physical, chemical and toxic properties Biological –e.g. bacteria, viruses, infection Human-factor –e.g. stress, bullying 08/04/2017 Miriam Horgan, Department of Education and Skills

9 Miriam Horgan, Department of Education and Skills
Hazards in Schools Where and what are the potential hazards in schools? What are the potential hazards in laboratories? 08/04/2017 Miriam Horgan, Department of Education and Skills

10 Potential Hazards in Schools
Kitchen -e.g. slippery floors, hot surfaces, sharp objects Classroom -e.g. damaged seats, trailing cables, broken sockets Sports hall -e.g. gym equipment, manual handling Laboratory – varied, extensive list including corrosive or poisonous chemicals, chemical fumes, bunsen burners, hotplates, dissecting kits, glassware, gas, electricity, radiation, fire, slips, trips, falls 08/04/2017 Miriam Horgan, Department of Education and Skills

11 Miriam Horgan, Department of Education and Skills
Risks Risk Risk is the likelihood that someone will be harmed by the hazard together with the severity of harm suffered. Risk also depends on the number of people exposed to the hazard. -e.g. fumes from chemicals Controls/control measures Controls/control measures are the precautions taken to ensure that the risk is eliminated or reduced. Risk assessment identify the hazard estimate the severity and likelihood of harm arising from such a hazard. put in place control measures to minimise the risk or weigh up whether he or she has taken enough precautions to prevent harm. 08/04/2017 Miriam Horgan, Department of Education and Skills

12 Laboratory Rules for Students
Safety in School Science (2001) Department of Education and Skills (appendix K) Display in Laboratory 1. DO NOT enter the laboratory without permission. 2. DO NOT use any equipment unless permitted to do so by the teacher. Make sure you know exactly what you are supposed to do. If in doubt, ask the teacher. 3. Long hair MUST always be tied back securely. 4. ALWAYS wear eye protection when instructed to do so. 5. ALWAYS check that the label on the bottle is EXACTLY the same as the material you require. If in doubt, ask the teacher. 08/04/2017 Miriam Horgan, Department of Education and Skills

13 Laboratory Rules for Students ctd.
6. NOTHING must be tasted, eaten or drunk in the laboratory. 7. Any substance accidentally taken into the mouth must be spat out IMMEDIATELY and the mouth washed out with plenty of water. The incident must be reported to the teacher. 8. Any cut, burn or other accident MUST be reported at once to the teacher. 9. Any chemicals spilled on the skin or clothing MUST be washed at once with plenty of water and report to teacher. 10. Always WASH your hands after practical work. 08/04/2017 Miriam Horgan, Department of Education and Skills

14 Chemicals Hazards and Controls
Laboratory hazards may be caused by unauthorised access cluttered environment inadequate fumehood maintenance lack of or poor PPE Controls lock laboratory when not in use organisation and clean up fumehood fit for purpose – not storage face shield, safety goggles, gloves, safety screen etc. 08/04/2017 Miriam Horgan, Department of Education and Skills

15 Chemicals Hazards and Controls
Chemical hazards may be caused by fire lack of knowledge of risks in relation to experiments limited information on hazardous chemicals chemical ingestion/absorption Controls Fire, smoke, heat detectors fitted in stores, fire extinguishers, fire blankets, sand buckets Identify risks and safety practices to be communicated to students MSDS sheets, Safety in school lab (DES), correct, legible labels Adequate hand wash, eyewash facilities, gloves 08/04/2017 Miriam Horgan, Department of Education and Skills

16 Miriam Horgan, Department of Education and Skills
Chemicals Hazards Storage hazards may be caused by Incorrect storage out-of-date chemicals in use reaction in storage Spills poor labelling fire accessing flammable chemicals Controls Store in well ventilated areas, correct classifications stored in separate areas Inspect regularly, buy small quantities, dispose correctly correct classifications stored in separate areas anti-roll lips on shelves, chemicals below eye level clear labels with hazard symbols Flame resistant press 08/04/2017 Miriam Horgan, Department of Education and Skills

17 Material Safety Data Sheets
16 headings Most useful information on MSDS Hazard Identification First Aid Handling and Storage Personal Protection Disposal The MSDS should be obtained from the chemical suppliers 08/04/2017 Miriam Horgan, Department of Education and Skills

18 Miriam Horgan, Department of Education and Skills
Hazard Symbols Toxic Highly Flammable Oxidising Corrosive Dangerous for Environment Explosive n i Harmful Irritant 08/04/2017 Miriam Horgan, Department of Education and Skills

19 Labelling of Chemicals
Dangerous substances should comply with EU labelling regulations CLP LEGISLATION In general labels should include the following data: Name of sample. Sodium hydroxide Concentration when appropriate. A word or symbol to indicate the hazard if necessary. In the case of dangerous chemicals the risk and safety phrases. Name of the teacher/the date. 08/04/2017 Miriam Horgan, Department of Education and Skills

20 Sample Label for Sodium Hydroxide
NaOH 1.0 M R 35 Causes severe burns. S 26 In case of contact with eyes, rinse immediately with plenty of water and seek medical advice. S 36/37/39 Wear suitable protective clothing, gloves and eye/face protection. Wear suitable protective clothing, gloves and eye/face protection. 08/04/2017 Miriam Horgan, Department of Education and Skills

21 Miriam Horgan, Department of Education and Skills
08/04/2017 Miriam Horgan, Department of Education and Skills

22 CHEMICAL STORAGE GROUPS
RED Flammable storage GREY General chemicals no particular storage hazard 08/04/2017 Miriam Horgan, Department of Education and Skills

23 CHEMICAL STORAGE GROUPS
BLUE Toxic or health hazard YELLOW Oxidising chemicals GREEN Corrosives – alkaline WHITE Corrosives – acids 08/04/2017 Miriam Horgan, Department of Education and Skills

24 Miriam Horgan, Department of Education and Skills
Further Segregation Segregation of Flammables Flammable liquids should be stored separately from flammable solids. Two fire resistant cupboards would be ideal, one larger one for bottles of flammable liquids and a smaller version for the flammable solids. Keep oxidisers away from flammable chemicals 08/04/2017 Miriam Horgan, Department of Education and Skills

25 Miriam Horgan, Department of Education and Skills
Further Segregation Toxic chemicals should be stored away from flammables and oxidising agents Corrosive substances burn skin and eyes and may also react with incompatible packaging or metals like storage racking. Store away from flammable liquids and gases, oxidising agents and organic peroxides 08/04/2017 Miriam Horgan, Department of Education and Skills

26 Further Storage Precautions
Chemicals should not be stored in alphabetical order as this can result in incompatible neighbours e.g. NH3(g) and Br2 :- unstable NBr3 is formed, explosion may result Chemicals should not be stored according to poorly chosen categories: all acids or all organics together. some acids - also reducing agents (CH3COOH) some acids also oxidising agents (HNO3). some oxidising agents incompatible with each other e.g. H2O2 and KMNO4. 08/04/2017 Miriam Horgan, Department of Education and Skills

27 Further Storage Precautions
Harmful chemicals can be further isolated by using (i) plastic tray/boxes or (ii) outer container. (i) Plastic Trays/Boxes A number of compatible chemicals are placed in a plastic tray or plastic box and a label put on the outside of the tray/box to indicate what chemicals are stored within. (ii) Outer Container Put the container in a heavy duty plastic bag (freezer bag),tie the bag, place it in an outer container (an unused paint can or a snap open secure container) with some absorbing agent and securely fix on the lid. 08/04/2017 Miriam Horgan, Department of Education and Skills

28 Further considerations for safe storage of chemicals
Include: Only authorised persons should have access to chemical stores, which should be locked when not in use. Chemicals that are no longer required should be carefully disposed of according to MSDS/Department guidelines. The chemical store should be well ventilated Shelves should have anti-roll off lips Chemicals should not be stored in shelves above eye level. If necessary - smaller bottles, steps Avoid floor chemical storage, if possible. 08/04/2017 Miriam Horgan, Department of Education and Skills

29 Shelf Lives of Chemicals
Many chemicals, e.g. Al2O3, have extremely long shelf Some chemicals may have short shelf lives Deterioration in storage could health and safety issue harmless, with change in composition Risk of contamination Risk of oxidation Risk of peroxide formation and detonation Buy small quantities 08/04/2017 Miriam Horgan, Department of Education and Skills

30 Extra Safety Apparatus
The following safety apparatus should be available in the laboratory. Safety screen Face shield (for teachers only) Eye wash/shower – an eye wash stand or eye wash bottle or a fixed rubber tube on a convenient tap. Fire extinguishers (CO2 /dry powder) Fire blankets Fire buckets Chemical spill Clean up kit First aid kit. 08/04/2017 Miriam Horgan, Department of Education and Skills

31 Miriam Horgan, Department of Education and Skills
Spill Control A chemical spill clean up kit should contain:- 1. A bucket of dry sand. 2. A bucket of an absorbing agent. 3. A bucket of anhydrous sodium carbonate (for acid spills). 4. Plastic dust pan and brush. 5. Heavy duty plastic bags. 6. Two warning notices Provide precautions against skin and eye contact. Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS), and the Department of Education and Science publication “Safety in the School Laboratory” will detail any specific precautions. 08/04/2017 Miriam Horgan, Department of Education and Skills

32 Discontinued Use of Chemicals – Substances of very high concern
Circular 0014/2011 Sodium Chromate, Sodium Dichromate, Potassium Chromate, Potassium Dichromate, Ammonium Dichromate, Copper Chromate, Copper(II) Dichromate and all other chromium(VI) compounds; Cobalt(II) Chloride, Cobalt(II) Nitrate and all other Cobalt(II) compounds; any other chemically related compounds Use of cobalt chloride paper should also cease. 08/04/2017 Miriam Horgan, Department of Education and Skills

33 Discontinued Use of Chemicals – Substances of very high concern
Circular 0014/2011 Curriculum implications are being examined in collaboration with the NCCA & SEC Further communication will issue in due course. In the interim, these topics will remain as part of the syllabus in terms of the theoretical knowledge of the experimental procedure, and its outcomes, but students will not be required to have physically undertaken the procedure. These topics will, as heretofore, remain examinable in the Leaving Certificate Chemistry Examinations until notice to the contrary is given. 08/04/2017 Miriam Horgan, Department of Education and Skills

34 Miriam Horgan, Department of Education and Skills
Resources PP Science and Applied Maths section Chemistry Resources Safety Docs Safety in School Science (DES) Safety in School Laboratory (DES) Safety Legislation (PSI) Storage of Laboratory Chemicals (PSI) Chemical Shelf Lives (PSI) Stock Control (PSI) Material Safety Data Sheets Safety in the School Laboratory (HSA) Education Managing Health and Safety in Schools Teacher Support and Classroom Resources Safety and Health Training for Teachers Safety and Health Initiatives in Education 08/04/2017 Miriam Horgan, Department of Education and Skills

35 Miriam Horgan, Department of Education and Skills
Recap Legislative background Safety Statement Hazard – definition, types Risk –definition, assessment, control Safe laboratory rules Chemical Hazards – handling, disposal, storage, Labelling, MSDS sheets Health and Safety Act 2005 Chemical Acts 2008 and 2010 08/04/2017 Miriam Horgan, Department of Education and Skills

36 Miriam Horgan, Department of Education and Skills
Thank You 08/04/2017 Miriam Horgan, Department of Education and Skills


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