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Transforming Teacher Preparation through Academic and Career Technical Education Partnerships: A Linked Learning Lens Nancy Farnan Director, School of.

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Presentation on theme: "Transforming Teacher Preparation through Academic and Career Technical Education Partnerships: A Linked Learning Lens Nancy Farnan Director, School of."— Presentation transcript:

1 Transforming Teacher Preparation through Academic and Career Technical Education Partnerships: A Linked Learning Lens Nancy Farnan Director, School of Teacher Education San Diego State University Penni Hudis Director, Pathway and Curriculum Development ConnectEd: The California Center for College and Career

2 Slide 2 Schools of the 19 th Century The U.S. became the first country to open secondary education to the public.  1821 – Boston, English High School became the first public high school as an alternative to private schools.  1826 – First law that required free public school; many did not admit girls.  Only 300 high schools existed prior to the Civil War in By 1900 there were 6000 high schools.  Curriculum varied, with no agreement on purpose.

3 Slide 3 Based on the final report from the Committee of Ten, the following recommendations guided development of 20 th Century high schools:  A rigorous academic curriculum for all students regardless of their future plans.  A focus on nine core academic subjects for all students: Latin, Greek, English, modern languages, mathematics, sciences (physics astronomy, and chemistry), history (including economics and government), natural history (study of organisms and natural objects), and geography  Association of one discipline with another “by program and by the actual teaching” p. 4 Schools of the 20 th Century

4 Slide 4 20 th Century Schools and Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching (1906) The Carnegie Unit (CU) measured the amount of time a student studied a subject [1 unit = 120 hours of contact time]. 14 units became the minimum for an academic high school course of study. The CU communicated to universities what students had done in high school.

5 Slide 5 Fast Forward to the 21 st Century High schools today look very much like high schools that were created in the 19 th Century. Most are still using a familiar old model. There is little connection between students’ courses and their future plans Seat time (CUs) measures what students have done in high school

6 Slide 6 Fast Forward to the 21 st Century Some schools are transforming the teaching and learning experience. A new model speaks to today’s students and their changing world: Linked Learning.

7 Slide 7 What Do Students Say Today? 3 in 4 say they could be doing better in school if they were motivated to work harder 9 in 10 believe connecting classes to their future and real-world careers would inspire them to work hard and do well in school 9 in 10 say they would like to take courses for college and have the opportunity to acquire skills and knowledge relevant to future careers Source: Statewide poll conducted by Peter D. Hart Research Associates, commissioned by The James Irvine Foundation

8 Slide 8 Connecting College and Career By connecting academics and career technical education, Linked Learning pathways Expose students to a broad industry sector of the economy. Provide comprehensive programs of both academic and technical study. Offer a thematic, practical focus that inspires students to achieve.

9 Slide 9 Industry Sectors and Organizing Themes

10 Slide 10 Pathways: Organizing Principles Prepare students for both college and career Lead to the full range of postsecondary options Connect academics to real-world applications Improve student achievement

11 Slide 11 Pathways : Core Components An academic core meeting postsecondary admissions requirements of UC, CSU, & community colleges A technical core meeting industry standards; providing certification Work-based learning – more than a workplace experience Support services — supplementary instruction, counseling, and transportation A multi-grade program consisting of:

12 Slide 12 Academic Core An academic core meeting postsecondary admissions requirements of UC, CSU, and community colleges 4 years of English 3 years of math (4 recommended) 2 years of social studies 2 years of lab science (3 recommended) 2 years of world language (3 recommended) 1 year VAPA 1 year college prep elective

13 Slide 13 Technical Core Shift from narrow occupationally specific preparation to career clusters. Meet CTE and industry standards and provide certification. Sequence of 4 or more courses. Infuse and reinforce academic content and standards Examples: - Engineering, robotics - Health science, sports medicine - Animation, graphic design - Advanced manufacturing - Agriculture and renewable resources

14 Slide 14 Work-Based Learning Includes mentoring, job shadowing, internships, school-based enterprise, virtual apprenticeship. Reinforces both academic and CTE standards. Students develop meaningful relationships with adult role models. Immerses students in “adult world,” leading to maturity, understanding of professional behaviors, high expectations

15 Slide 15 Support Services Supplemental instruction for students below grade level: o Additional coursework – but, rather than more of the same, uses an integrated, applied learning approach o Extended day, extended year o Tutoring and other assistance College and career guidance and counseling Transportation to/from work- based learning

16 Slide 16 Many Models Already Exist More than 550 California Partnership Academies Another 300 career pathways (including National Academy Foundation programs) Themed magnet schools, charter schools, and small schools Other high school programs - e.g., early college HS programs, High Tech Highs, Big Picture Schools, New Tech High Schools

17 Slide 17 District Initiative Currently, the following school districts have been funded by the James Irvine Foundation to receive support to transform their high schools into Linked Learning pathway programs. Antioch USD Long Beach USD Los Angeles, Local District 4 Montebello USD Oakland USD Pasadena USD Porterville USD Sacramento USD West Contra Costa USD

18 Slide 18 Common Features Tend to operate as small learning communities Incorporate Regional Occupational Programs and community college course-taking options, as appropriate and available Blend academic and career technical education course content By design, students are expected to complete a rigorous academic core, a demanding technical core, and associated work-based learning activities. Learning is project-based, rigorous and relevant, and supported by a range of services.

19 Slide 19 Compared with their peers, students in pathways….  Display lower absenteeism  Are less likely to drop out and more likely to complete high school  Pass the California High School Exit Exam at higher rates  Are more likely to score proficient or higher on California Standardized Tests in English, science, and social studies  Earn more annually in the five years after high school graduation The Evidence

20 Slide 20 Linked Learning Pathways Require Teachers Who...  Have the skills, willingness, and ability to integrate Career Technical Education and work-based learning with academic content.  Have the skills, willingness, and ability to collaborate on inter- and intra-disciplinary teams for curriculum design and delivery.  Understand problem- and project-based learning and how to use this knowledge to develop standards-based curriculum.  Understand the demands and new roles for teachers in pathways.

21 Slide 21 Linked Learning Pathways Lens: Beginning the Transformation in the Single Subject Credential Program It is NOT a new credential program It IS a state-approved SB 2042 Single Subject Credential Program. It brings NEW FOCUS to a Single Subject credential program.

22 Slide 22 The Linked Learning Lens Provides A New Focus That Develops New Single Subject Teachers Who... Understand, develop, and implement the skills and proficiencies required in Linked Learning pathways, schools and programs, including the ability and willingness to:  assume new leadership roles;  communicate and work with community, industry, and postsecondary partners;  establish a personalized learning environment that meets the unique learning needs of each individual students;  integrate Career Technical Education and work-based learning with academic content;  collaborate in interdisciplinary teams.

23 Slide 23 Models for Continuing the Transformation: Career Technical Education Teachers Who… Understand, develop, and implement the skills and proficiencies required in Linked Learning pathways, schools and programs, including the ability and willingness to  assume new leadership roles;  establish a personalized learning environment that meets the unique learning needs of each individual student;  integrate Career Technical Education and work-based learning with academic content; and  collaborate in interdisciplinary teams.

24 Slide 24 Key Partnerships ConnectEd: The California Center for College and Career  Provides technical assistance, expertise, research and materials San Diego State University’s School of Teacher Education  With support from The James Irvine Foundation, leads the Linked Learning Lens in teacher preparation network. A growing network of teacher preparation institutions  Implementing a Linked Learning pathways model Year 1: SDSU, CSU Fresno, CSU Sacramento, CSU San Bernardino Year 2: CSU Long Beach, UCLA Year 3: CSU East Bay, TBD

25 Slide 25 Key Partnerships Key Partnerships Linked Learning pathway schools and programs….  All research on teacher preparation places fieldwork/clinical experiences at the center of new teacher learning.  University-school partnerships are crucial to the successful preparation of new teachers, and nowhere more critical than in the preparation of teachers for pathways school reforms.

26 Slide 26 Key Partnerships The James Irvine Foundation, whose support has been and will continue to be integral to the success of the network of partners committed to ensuring that all students have an opportunity for an education that prepares them for the range of postsecondary life opportunities.

27 Slide 27 Adding the Linked Learning Pathways Lens to Your Curriculum Articulate the Linked Learning educational model and its foundations. Deepen (or add) training in integrated, problem/project-based, multi- disciplinary, integrated curricula. Require students to incorporate a Linked Learning pathways lens as they design their lesson plans including multidisciplinary, integrated projects.

28 Slide 28 Add a Focus on 21st Century Success Skills Our students need more than academics to be successful. They must develop skills that are integral to success in the 21st Century workforce.  Oral and written communication skills  Learning and innovation skills  Interpersonal skills  Ethics and social responsibility  Leadership roles  Professionalism  Teamwork/Collaboration

29 Slide 29 Essential Truth for Today’s Students Linked Learning “pathways tell high school students the truth: today you must prepare for both postsecondary education and career. It is essential to combine challenging academics and demanding career and technical education and not settle for just one or the other.” Gary Hoachlander President ConnectEd: The California Center for College and Career

30 Slide 30 Discussion…. Questions Comments

31 Slide 31 Contact Us! Nancy Farnan Penni Hudis


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