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School Improvement Grant Information for Board Members January 22, 2014 Linda C. Reeves Bureau Director Office of School Recovery.

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Presentation on theme: "School Improvement Grant Information for Board Members January 22, 2014 Linda C. Reeves Bureau Director Office of School Recovery."— Presentation transcript:

1 School Improvement Grant Information for Board Members January 22, 2014 Linda C. Reeves Bureau Director Office of School Recovery

2 School Improvement Grant (1003g) Overview The School Improvement Grants (SIG) program is authorized by section 1003(g) of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA). States are to provide sub-grants to local educational agencies for the purpose of providing assistance for school improvement. An SEA must ―give priority to the local educational agencies with the lowest-achieving schools that demonstrate: A.the greatest need for such funds; and B.the strongest commitment to ensuring that funds are used to substantially raise student achievement and meet the goals. MS Department of Education Office of School Recovery January 22, 20142

3 Transforming Our Schools January 22, 20143

4 Schools Eligible To Apply All FY Priority Are Eligible To Apply A. W. James E.S.-Sunflower Co. Ashland E.S.-Benton B. E. Woolfolk M.S.-Yazoo City Coahoma A.H.S. Coldwater Att. Center-Tate Co. D. M. Smith M.S.-Cleveland Dexter H.S.–Walthall Co. Forest Hill H.S.-J.P.S Gentry H.S.-Indianola Green E.S.-J.P.S Hazlehurst H.S.-Hazlehurst Hazlehurst M.S.-Hazlehurst Hinds County A.H.S. Jefferson Upper E.S.-Jefferson Leflore Co. E.S.-Leflore Co. Leflore Co. H.S.-Leflore Co. Leland School Park-Leland Nailor E.S.-Cleveland North Panola H.S.-North Panola O. M. McNair E.S.-Humphreys Co. Okolona E.S.-Okolona Okolona H.S.-Okolona Port Gibson M.S.- Claiborne Co. Provine H.S.-J.P.S. Rosa Fort H.S.-Tunica Co. Shannon H.S.-Lee Co. Tylertown Primary-Walthall Co. Velma Jackson H.S.-Madison Co. West Bolivar M.S.-West Bolivar West Oktibbeha H.S.-Oktibbeha Co. West Point H.S.-West Point Wingfield H.S.-J.P.S Yazoo City H.S.-Yazoo City MS Department of Education Office of School Recovery January 22, 20144

5 Who Will Receive The Grants? Awards to Schools with the Greatest Need and Greatest Commitment for Change LEA that agrees to implement one of four rigorous interventions models and demonstrates the capacity to fully implement MS Department of Education Office of School Recovery January 22, 20145

6 How much? Identified schools can qualify for $50,000 - $2,000,000 per year per school Grants allocation is renewable for up to two (2) additional years Between 2 and 8 schools will receive grants Grant period ends September 2017 MS Department of Education Office of School Recovery January 22, 20146

7 Annual Grant Renewal Funding for years 2 and 3 is contingent upon each school meeting established goals or on a clear trajectory to do so. School personnel must engage in continuous data analysis to drive their school improvement efforts. MS Department of Education Office of School Recovery January 22, 20147

8 Recognizing the Sense of Urgency, the District Must Take Bold Steps transform Core district leaders and the school board must decide on an improvement effort that will lead to rapid gains and transform the school. MS Department of Education Office of School Recovery January 22, 20148

9 Recognizing the Sense of Urgency, the District Must Take Bold Steps District expectations and the core message is clearly communicated multiple times and in multiple formats. “Drive” Who should “Drive” the transformation? School Board, Superintendent, Principals, School Improvement Officer The driving force behind school improvement will be the School Board, Superintendent, Principals, School Improvement Officer with support from district level leaders and departments. MS Department of Education Office of School Recovery January 22, 20149

10 Rapidly Improving Districts and Schools Have…. Strategically allocated human and fiscal resources to support teaching and learning. Restructured district and/or school functions, policies and procedures to support district and school improvement efforts. Communicated a vision for school improvement with specific measurable goals. Established a focus on equity, equal access, and shared responsibility. MS Department of Education Office of School Recovery January 22,

11 Rapidly Improving Districts and Schools Have…. Established a system to coordinate and monitor all school improvement initiatives to determine program effectiveness. Aligned pacing guides, assessments and lesson plans with state curriculum frameworks and grade level proficiency standards. Data collection and analysis processes in place that drive all instructional decisions. MS Department of Education Office of School Recovery January 22,

12 Rapidly Improving Districts and Schools Have…. Taken advantage of internal and external expertise to build the staff’s capacity to deliver quality instruction through job embedded professional development and instructional coaching opportunities. Engaged teachers and principals in continuous problem solving related to teaching and learning / instructional improvement (SHARED DECISION MAKING). Focused on improving relationships among adults and among adults and students. MS Department of Education Office of School Recovery January 22,

13 Rapidly Improving Districts and Schools Have…. Fostered an environment that builds positive attitudes, trust, respect, open dialogue, and a willingness to change. ATTAIN Kept the focus on “First Things First” – whatever it takes to improve and for our children to ATTAIN proficiency. Developed a school culture where shared responsibility and accountability for results permeate the school. – Business as Usual has been redefined MS Department of Education Office of School Recovery January 22,

14 The Bottom Line for the District clear, transparent, timely, and unwavering. Communication about serious school reform must be: unified equipped to explain the brutal facts as well as a clear vision of what will be better for students District leaders and boards must be: Communication with the media must be: Communication with stakeholders must include: systematic and intentional proactive well-executed multiple, face-to-face contacts with many people Source : NNSSIL by Center on Innovation & Improvement and Council of Chief State School Officers 14 MS Department of Education Office of School Recovery January 22,

15 THE four Intervention Models January 22,

16 Transformation Model January 22,

17 TRANSFORMATION THEORY OF ACTION MS Department of Education Office of School Recovery Existing configuration of leadership and instructional personnel has not created a learning environment in which students are succeeding… To dramatically change the environment for the benefit of the children currently enrolled in the school, the adults must change… Under transformation, change entails literal change of leadership as well as behavioral change by instructional personnel January 22,

18 Teachers and Leaders Replace principal Implement new evaluation system Developed with staff Uses student growth as a significant factor Identify and reward staff who are increasing student outcomes; support and then remove those who are not Implement strategies to recruit, place and retain staff Instructional and Support Strategies Select and implement an instructional model based on student needs Provide job- embedded professional development designed to build capacity and support staff Ensure continuous use of data to inform and differentiate instruction Time and Support Provide increased learning time Staff and students Provide ongoing mechanism for community and family engagement Partner to provide social-emotional and community-oriented services and supports Governance Provide sufficient operating flexibility to implement reform Ensure ongoing technical assistance TRANSFORMATION MODEL MS Department of Education Office of School Recovery January 22,

19 COMPETENCIES OF A TRANSFORMATION LEADER/ PRINCIPAL Driving for Results – the transformation leader’s strong desire to achieve outstanding results and the task-oriented actions required for success. Influencing for Results – motivating others and influencing their thinking and behavior to obtain results. Transformation leaders cannot accomplish change alone, but instead must rely on the work of others. Problem Solving – including analysis of data to inform decisions; making clear, logical plans that people can follow; and ensuring a strong connection between school learning goals and classroom activity. Showing Confidence to Lead – staying visibly focused, committed, and self-assured despite the barrage of personal and professional attacks common during turnarounds. Source: Public Impact (2008). School Turnaround Leaders: Competencies for Success. MS Department of Education Office of School Recovery January 22,

20 If you try to change a school without understanding it, you will fail. Source: NNSSIL by Center on Innovation & Improvement and Council of Chief State School Officers 20 MS Department of Education Office of School Recovery January 22,

21 The Right Turnaround Leader Will Communicate an honest, compelling vision of where we are and where we can and will be Drive for Results Vivid picture of what success will look like What the changes will mean for students Set specific learning goals rather than vague promises Monitor student performance and program implementation using with multiple, disaggregated data sources “Being very specific about required steps and the necessary actions to carry them out helps capable staff members make the change, and puts those who do not change on notice” (Kowal, Rosch, Hassel, & Hassel, 2009, p. 19). Source: NNSSIL by Center on Innovation & Improvement and Council of Chief State School Officers 21 MS Department of Education Office of School Recovery January 22,

22 The school leader must embody the vision as well as dedication to the work that will ensure a better education for students. “Walk the Talk” Source: NNSSIL by Center on Innovation & Improvement and Council of Chief State School Officers 22 MS Department of Education Office of School Recovery January 22,

23 The Vision is Non-Negotiable Support the vision with sound dataEngage everyone in a “culture of candor”Make objective decisions about personnel with: Clear expectations Data about each person’s demonstration of effective practice Data about learning outcomes for students “Being very specific about required steps and the necessary actions to carry them out helps capable staff members make the change, and puts those who do not change on notice” (Kowal, Rosch, Hassel, & Hassel, 2009, p. 19). Source: NNSSIL by Center on Innovation & Improvement and Council of Chief State School Officers 23 MS Department of Education Office of School Recovery January 22,

24 “Here is what we are going to do. This is why we are using this approach. This is what we envision our school to look like as a result of our action.” Why is this message important? MS Department of Education Office of School Recovery January 22,

25 January 22, 2014 MS Department of Education Office of School Recovery 25 “One of the leader’s most important initial actions in a turnaround is to clarify for all employees what ‘success’ will be and what is needed to get there” (Kowal et al., 2009, p. 12). “One of the leader’s most important initial actions in a turnaround is to clarify for all employees what ‘success’ will be and what is needed to get there” (Kowal et al., 2009, p. 12).

26 Turnaround Model January 22,

27 Teachers and Leaders Replace principal Use locally adopted “turnaround” competencies to review and select staff for school (rehire no more than 50% of existing staff) Implement strategies to recruit, place and retain staff Instructional and Support Strategies Select and implement an instructional model based on student needs Provide job- embedded PD designed to build capacity and support staff Ensure continuous use of data to inform and differentiate instruction Time and Support Provide increased learning time Staff and students Provide ongoing mechanism for community and family engagement Partner to provide social-emotional and community- oriented services and supports Governance New governance structure Grant operating flexibility to school leader Ensure ongoing technical assistance TURNAROUND MODEL MS Department of Education Office of School Recovery January 22,

28 Restart Model January 22,

29 Restart Restart model is one in which an LEA converts a school or closes and reopens a school under a charter school operator, a charter management organization (CMO), or an education management organization (EMO) that has been selected through a rigorous review process. MS Department of Education Office of School Recovery January 22,

30 Restart A restart model must enroll, within the grades it serves, any former student who wishes to attend the school. A rigorous review process could take such things into consideration as an applicant’s team, track record, instructional program, model’s theory of action, sustainability. As part of this model, a state must review the process the LEA will use/has used to select the partner. MS Department of Education Office of School Recovery January 22,

31 Closure Model January 22,

32 School Closure Model School closure occurs when an LEA closes a school and enrolls the students who attended that school in other schools in the LEA that are higher achieving. MS Department of Education Office of School Recovery January 22,

33 School Closure Model These other schools should be within reasonable proximity to the closed school and may include, but are not limited to, charter schools or new schools for which achievement data are not yet available. Office for Civil Rights Technical Assistance Module—Struggling Schools and School Closure Issues: An Overview of Civil Rights Considerations MS Department of Education Office of School Recovery January 22,

34 Performance Goals MS Department of Education Office of School Recovery January 22,

35 Performance Measures Leading Indicators Number of minutes within the school year and school day; Student participation rate on State assessments in reading/language arts and in mathematics, by student subgroup; Dropout rate; Student attendance rate; Number and percentage of students completing advanced coursework (e.g., AP/IB), early-college high schools, or dual enrollment classes; Discipline incidents; Truants; Distribution of teachers by performance level on an LEA’s teacher evaluation system; and Teacher attendance rate. 35 MS Department of Education Office of School Recovery January 22,

36 Performance Measures Achievement Indicators (Lagging Indicators) Percentage of students at or above proficiency level on State assessments in reading/language arts and mathematics, by both grade level, and by student subgroup; Average scale score on State assessments in reading/language arts and mathematics, by grade, for the “all students” group, for each achievement quartile, and for each subgroup; Percentage of limited English proficient students who attain English language proficiency; School improvement status and AYP targets met and missed; College enrollment rates; and Graduation rate. Continuous Analysis of Benchmarks of Progress by Schools and Districts 36 MS Department of Education Office of School Recovery January 22,

37 Expectations Fully and completely implement the chosen intervention model Implementation of sustainable initiatives DO WHAT IS RIGHT FOR CHILDREN MS Department of Education Office of School Recovery January 22,

38 Are you ready to embrace the challenge? January 22,

39 Support and encourage your LEA to Apply for the SIG Grant January 22,

40 The Children of your community are counting on you MS Department of Education Office of School Recovery January 22,

41 Contact Mississippi Department of Education Office of School Recovery Phone Fax Dr. Laura B. Jones, Bureau Manager Linda C. Reeves, Bureau Director Chris Norwood, Staff Officer MS Department of Education Office of School Recovery January 22,


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