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1 Requirements for Focus Schools Focus Schools Conference Presenter: Yvonne A. Holloman, Ph.D. September 17-18, 2012.

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Presentation on theme: "1 Requirements for Focus Schools Focus Schools Conference Presenter: Yvonne A. Holloman, Ph.D. September 17-18, 2012."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 Requirements for Focus Schools Focus Schools Conference Presenter: Yvonne A. Holloman, Ph.D. September 17-18, 2012

2 Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA) Flexibility Waiver 2

3 3 Purpose of ESEA Flexibility ESEA scheduled for reauthorization in 2007 Congress failed to reauthorize Disproportionate percentage of schools misidentified as underperforming Flexibility offered to promote reform and respond to state concerns

4 4 Flexibility Principles College- and career-ready standards and assessments Differentiated supports and interventions for underperforming schools Teacher and principal evaluation systems

5 5 Under the provisions of the two-year flexibility waiver granted by USED on June 29, ambitious but achievable annual measurable objectives (AMOs) have been set for student subgroups, including new “proficiency gap groups” comprising students who historically have had difficulty meeting the commonwealth’s achievement standards.

6 Hispanic students, of one or more races* Hispanic students, of one or more races* Black students, not of Hispanic origin* Black students, not of Hispanic origin* System of Differentiated Recognition, Accountability, and Support 6 Students with Disabilities English Language Learners Economically Disadvantaged Students with Disabilities English Language Learners Economically Disadvantaged Gap Group 1 (unduplicated) Gap Group 1 (unduplicated) Gap Group 2 Gap Group 3 *to include students with disabilities, English language learners, and economically disadvantaged students

7 7 Reading benchmarks will be reset based on the performance of students during on new reading SOL tests reflecting the increased rigor of the 2010 English standards.

8 8 Mathematics benchmarks are based on student achievement on the rigorous new Standards of Learning (SOL) tests introduced last year and are designed for the specific purpose of cutting in half the gap between Virginia’s lowest- and highest-performing schools. These new annual objectives should not be compared with last year’s AYP benchmarks. The mathematics AMOs will be revised and recommended for approval by the Board of Education on October 25, 2012

9 What other individual subgroups must meet AMOs? 9 Gap Group 1 Students with Disabilities English Language Learners Economically Disadvantaged Gap Group 2 Black Students Gap Group 3 Hispanic Students All Students Other Subgroups under Safeguard Students with Disabilities English Language Learners White Economically Disadvantaged Asian Focus Schools

10 10

11 Focus Schools States must identify ten percent of the state’s Title I schools as focus schools based on: Low performance in one or more proficiency gap groupsLow performance in one or more proficiency gap groups Total: 72 schoolsTotal: 72 schools States must identify ten percent of the state’s Title I schools as focus schools based on: Low performance in one or more proficiency gap groupsLow performance in one or more proficiency gap groups Total: 72 schoolsTotal: 72 schools 11

12 Methodology for Proficiency Gap Group Calculation Virginia will rank order schools by proficiency gap points: Calculate difference between the AMO target and each gap group’s performance in reading and mathematics to determine proficiency gap pointsCalculate difference between the AMO target and each gap group’s performance in reading and mathematics to determine proficiency gap points Sum the proficiency gap points in reading and mathematics (exclude any group that exceed or meet target)Sum the proficiency gap points in reading and mathematics (exclude any group that exceed or meet target) Rank schools in order of the total number of average proficiency gap pointRank schools in order of the total number of average proficiency gap point Identify 10 percent of Title I schools with the most gap pointsIdentify 10 percent of Title I schools with the most gap points Virginia will rank order schools by proficiency gap points: Calculate difference between the AMO target and each gap group’s performance in reading and mathematics to determine proficiency gap pointsCalculate difference between the AMO target and each gap group’s performance in reading and mathematics to determine proficiency gap points Sum the proficiency gap points in reading and mathematics (exclude any group that exceed or meet target)Sum the proficiency gap points in reading and mathematics (exclude any group that exceed or meet target) Rank schools in order of the total number of average proficiency gap pointRank schools in order of the total number of average proficiency gap point Identify 10 percent of Title I schools with the most gap pointsIdentify 10 percent of Title I schools with the most gap points 12

13 Establishing Proficiency Gap Group Points 13 Gap GroupReading Target Reading Performance Reading Performance Gap Points Gap Group NI* Gap Group Gap Group *NI – Not Included because the gap group met or exceeded the subject area target

14 Establishing Proficiency Gap Group Points 14 Gap Group 1: NI Gap Group 2: 10 Gap Group 3: 11 Sum Groups: 21 Divide by number of gaps: 21 / 2 Gap Points for Reading: 10.5

15 Schools with Highest Proficiency Gap Group Points GP 22 GP 23 GP 34 GP 35 GP 35 GP 35 GP 35 GP 35 GP 35 GP 35 GP 35 GP 35 GP 35 GP 35 GP Identify from the list of schools ranked by proficiency gap points a number equal to 10 percent of the state’s total Title I schools = 72 Schools

16 Division Requirements Collaborate with an external VDOE contractor and participate in a needs sensing interview Convene a division leadership team including representatives of:   Title I   Instruction   Special education   English language learners   Principals of each focus school Meet as a division leadership team on a monthly basis Develop, implement, and monitor a division improvement plan that is aligned with the needs of each focus school Participate in quarterly meetings with focus schools to review data and make decisions about needed technical assistance Modify division improvement plan on a quarterly basis based on data analysis School Requirements Convene a school leadership team including a member of the division leadership team Utilize a VDOE-approved adaptive reading assessment program to determine student growth at least quarterly Utilize the Algebra Readiness Diagnostic Test (ARDT) provided by the VDOE (required only for focus schools with grade 5 or higher) Develop, implement, and monitor a school improvement plan Develop an intervention strategy for all students who have failed an SOL assessment or failed to meet the fall PALS benchmark Regularly analyze a variety of data points to make strategic, data-driven decisions, and implement the needed interventions for identified students Modify school improvement plan on a quarterly basis based on data analysis 16

17 17 Focus Schools Guide

18 18 Focus Schools Guide SectionTopic 1ESEA Flexibility Waiver Information 2School- and Division-level Teams 3Indistar® Web-based Planning Tool 4Improvement Planning and Quarterly Data 5Differentiated Technical Assistance 6Miscellaneous Resources Each focus school principal and the division contact person will receive a focus schools guide outlining the ESEA flexibility waiver requirements for the school and the local educational agency. The guide is divided into the following sections:

19 19 html VDOE English and Reading Instructional Resources

20 20 VDOE Mathematics Instructional Resources

21 21 VDOE Science Instructional Resources


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