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Presentation on theme: "Dad’s Christmas Dubstep christmas-dubstep-dance- performance/?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=organic&utm."— Presentation transcript:

1 Dad’s Christmas Dubstep christmas-dubstep-dance- performance/?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=organic&utm _content=conservativedaily&utm_campaign=Viral

2 December 4, 2014 Healthy & Active Schools Training Coordinated School Health Wifi Password: HGINLR1234

3 Comprehensive School Physical Activity Program Training Audra Walters & Donna Miller Coordinated School Health

4 Our Purpose Today To become confident in your understanding of the 5 components of a Comprehensive School Physical Activity Program (CSPAP), how to develop, implement, and evaluate a CSPAP, and learn strategies for engaging school stakeholders in the CSPAP process.

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6 Seven Steps to Develop a CSPAP 1 Establish a committee and designate a PAL 2 Conduct a needs assessment 3 Create vision, goals, and objectives 4 Identify intended outcomes 5 Develop your CSPAP plan 6 Implement 7 Evaluate

7 Get up and get moving! Evolution of Mom Dancing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hq-URl9F17Y 3 partners for activities – Name, School District, and official/unofficial roles

8 National Guidance Children and adolescents should do 60 minutes (1 hour) or more of physical activity daily – Aerobic – Muscle strengthening – Bone strengthening Activities should be age- appropriate, enjoyable, and varied Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee. Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee Report, Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services;

9 Why Youth Physical Activity? Is an essential component of a healthy lifestyle Plays a powerful role in preventing chronic diseases Builds strong bones and muscles Increases physical fitness Promotes positive mental health U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Physical activity guidelines advisory committee report. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services;

10 Why Should Schools Provide Opportunities for Physical Activity? Students who are physically active… – Benefit physically, mentally, and emotionally – Can do better in school Help students achieve some or all of the recommended 60 minutes of physical activity

11 Physical Activity and Academic Achievement Physical Activity Practice Related Academic Achievement Outcomes Students who are physically active Have better grades, better school attendance, and better classroom behaviors Increased physical activity and physical fitness levels Improved cognitive performance Increased participation in physical education class Better grades, standardized test scores, and classroom behavior Time spent in recess Improved cognitive performance and classroom behaviors Participation in brief classroom physical activity breaks Improved cognitive performance, classroom behaviors, and education outcomes Participation in extracurricular physical activities Higher GPAs, lower drop-out rates, and fewer disciplinary problems 11

12 How Are Schools Doing? Only 3.8% of all elementary schools, 7.9% of all middle schools, and 2.1% of all high schools provided daily physical education. 26% of elementary schools did not provide regularly scheduled recess for students in all grades. Only 43.6% of elementary schools had students participate in regular physical activity breaks during school. Only 44.3% of all schools supported or promoted walking/biking to school. Lee SM, Burgeson C, Fulton JE, Spain CG. Physical education and physical activity: Results from the School Health Policies and Programs Study 2006.

13 Sneaker Partner What do you think is the biggest barrier for implementing more physical activity/ physical education in your school?

14 Comprehensive School Physical Activity Program Staff Involvement Physical Activity During School Physical Education Physical Activity Before and After School Family and Community Engageme nt 60 Minutes 14

15 Physical Education The foundation of a CSPAP Must implement effective PE: – Adequate instructional time – All classes to be taught by qualified PE specialists – Proper equipment and facilities – Adaptations for students with disabilities – Well-designed lessons – Not using PA as a punishment Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Comprehensive School Physical Activity Programs: A Guide for Schools. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; 2013

16 Physical Activity During School This includes classroom activity and recess: Classroom activity – Even 5-10 minutes in duration contributes to cognitive health (Castelli et al., 2007) – PreK-12 Recess – Minimum 20 minutes per day – Activity zones, active supervision, and equipment Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Comprehensive School Physical Activity Programs: A Guide for Schools. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; 2013

17 Physical Activity Before and After School School or community-sponsored activities/clubs/programs before and after school – Active commuting to school Walk and bike to school Walking school bus – Physical activity walking and running clubs – Intramurals (voluntary, student-centered, and all students) – Joint use agreements with community centers/buildings Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Comprehensive School Physical Activity Programs: A Guide for Schools. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; 2013

18 Staff Involvement Incorporate staff into PA programs Tailor programming to staff requests Service to staff via Employee Wellness Programs – Medical screenings – Brown bags – Walking programs – Group fitness PA breaks during meetings Role model for students Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Comprehensive School Physical Activity Programs: A Guide for Schools. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; 2013

19 Family and Community Engagement Engaging families and community to be active beyond the school day Social support is critical in youth physical activity choices Parent/guardian-led activities Family events Youth sports Joint Use Agreements! Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Comprehensive School Physical Activity Programs: A Guide for Schools. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; 2013

20 Coordination is Key CSPAP is a holistic approach to school physical activity Synergy across all components is critical Determine how each component complements the others Engage key stakeholders Communicate, communicate, communicate Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Comprehensive School Physical Activity Programs: A Guide for Schools. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; 2013

21 CSPAP Guide: A Navigation Tool Purpose: to enable physical education teachers and other physical activity leaders to develop, implement, and evaluate a CSPAP Components: – Brief introduction – Step-by-step process – Tools and templates

22 Step-by-Step Process for CSPAP 1.Establish a team/committee and designate a PAL 2.Conduct a needs assessment (SHI) 3.Create vision, goals, and objectives 4.Identify intended outcomes 5.Develop your CSPAP plan 6.Implement 7.Evaluate

23 Step 1. Establish a Wellness Committee An existing school wellness committee Should represent a diverse group of education and health stakeholders Serves in an advisory and decision-making role for establishing, implementing, and evaluating the CSPAP Designate a Physical Activity Leader (PAL)

24 Step 2: Conduct a needs assessment Identify existing physical activity policies, programs, and practices in the school School Health Index Let’s Move Active Schools Potential items to consider: Is there any PE policy at all? Are PE and PA policy included in school improvement plan? TOOLS

25 School Health Index 25

26 26

27 Step 2: Conduct a needs assessment Example of Needs Assessment Results : No before or after-school activities in place No recess activities provided No physical activity breaks provided

28 Water Bottle Partner Take 2-3 minutes to review the blue sheet, CSPAP Ideas for Your School Get together with your Water Bottle partner and share 2-3 activities you think might work for your school.

29 Step 3: Create vision, goals, and objectives Vision statement – Shared sense of purpose – Framework for establishing goals, objectives, and activities for wellness committee that include CSPAP – Implications for how CSPAP is organized Goals – Describe the long-term (5+ years) results or impact of CSPAP – Establish overall direction for and focus of a program – Serve as the foundation for developing program objectives

30 Step 3: Create vision, goals, and objectives Objectives – Describe program results to be achieved and how they will be achieved (use SMART objectives) – Have specific timelines for accomplishment – Align with goals

31 Vision Statement A declaration of a shared sense of purpose & provides a framework for establishing goals, objectives, and activities for your CSPAP Example of a vision statement from CDC: “Safer, Healthier People” – The School Health Services Vision Statement: “All Arkansas children are safe, healthy and ready to learn.”

32 Sample Goal and Objective Goal 1: Increase opportunities during the school day to increase moderate to vigorous physical activities for students. Objective 1: By the end of year one, all 6-8 grade classroom teachers will have participated in a ½ day professional development training on how to integrate physical activity into existing lesson plans.

33 Step 4: Identify intended outcomes Identify early on what changes you want to see as a result of CSPAP Outcomes include changes in: – Knowledge, attitudes, skills, behaviors, status, or level of functioning Three time blocks: – Short-term: 1-3 years – Intermediate: 3-5 years – Long-term: 4-6 years Identify indicators to monitor progress over time

34 Step 4: Identify intended outcomes Possible School Level Outcomes: – Increased amount of time dedicated to PE for all students – Increased opportunities for students to engage in daily recess Possible School Level Indicators: – Number of minutes dedicated to PE during the school day – Number of minutes dedicated to recess during the school day

35 Get up and get moving! Evolution of Hip Hop Dancing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZTpn30Pms8I

36 Step 5: Develop your CSPAP plan (pages 37-38, 59-60) Identify current resources Select activities currently/potentially offered Identify available activity time Identify activity leaders Develop budget Develop sustainability strategies for your CSPAP Develop communication and marketing strategies

37 Making it Happen! Activity Min/day offered Min/day activity Classroom breaks during school (3/day x 7 min ea.) 2116 PE Class (60 min/ week)126 Recess (one 15 min/day)1512 Recess (15 min before lunch)1512 Before school program/morning activity108 Total Physical Activity7354

38 Step 6: Implement your CSPAP Document what will be done, by whom, when, and how Serves as a checklist for the committee Aligns with the goals and objectives Consider implementation approach – Pilot – Phased – Full-scale

39 3 Implementation Approaches Pilot: small scale implementation planned as a test or trial Phased: a strategy to initiate a new program so that different parts of the school implement the change at different times and with varying intensity levels Full-scale: employing all resources and implementing each strategy

40 Creating a CSPAP Implementation Plan CSPAP Implementation Plan template (pg. 43) – Identify tasks, activities, or strategies to be accomplished – Who will lead the task? – Start data – Deadline – Necessary resources for implementing the task – Potential barriers to implementing the task – What communication strategies are needed for this task?

41 Step 7: Evaluate your CSPAP Purpose of evaluation – Describe, understand, and plan programs – Document what has happened in programs – Improve programs Two types of evaluation – Process – Outcome Conducting an evaluation – Part of program planning Using the data

42 Stairwell Speech: Practice Makes Perfect Use your yellow sheet to help identify the components of your Stairwell Speech Write down your ideas to make the case for PA at your school Take time practicing your stairwell/elevator speech Try your speech out on your partner List the stakeholders you will need to convince

43 Pedometer Partner Who (Introduce) What (Describe) Why (Impact) Need (Want/Need) Next (Leave the door open – time to meet)

44 1 Establish a committee and designate a PAL 2 Conduct a needs assessment 3 Create vision, goals, and objectives 4 Identify intended outcomes 5 Develop your CSPAP plan 6 Implement 7 Evaluate 7 Steps 5 Components

45 Q & A Please complete your CSPAP Evaluation! 45


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