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Out-of-school Educational Provision for the Gifted and Talented around the World Prof Joan Freeman.

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Presentation on theme: "Out-of-school Educational Provision for the Gifted and Talented around the World Prof Joan Freeman."— Presentation transcript:

1 Out-of-school Educational Provision for the Gifted and Talented around the World Prof Joan Freeman

2 Report for the Department of Education and Skills (UK) Free on

3 Gifts and talents – a world overview USA UK INDIA CHINA

4 A profound world split in attitudes to gifts and talent The Western view Only some children have gifted potential The Eastern view Most children have gifted potential

5 Cultural differences in gifts and talents WESTEAST Being Truthfulness, generosity, compassion, sacrifice and service to society Doing Competitive achievement, often in academic subjects rather than community values

6 Though there is overlap … The Western view  Genetic influences dominant  Human abilities measurable along a spectrum  Selection by high cut-off point The Eastern view  Environmental influences dominant  Main difference between individuals is rate of development  Good teaching and hard work bring success

7 Regional contrasts  Australia and New Zealand  Japan and China  Israel and the Arab and African world  Europe North and South  USA, Canada and South America

8 Five styles of out-of-school education 1.The Talent Search 2.Self selection by provision Freeman’s Sports Approach 3.Hard Work 4.Competitions 5.Voluntary provision

9 PrincipleHighly achieving youngsters selected by teacher recommendation, portfolios and tests for extra education Predominant countries USA, Australia, Israel, UK, HK AssumptionsGifted children can be distinguished and nurtured in bursts 1. The talent search

10 The talent search Center for Talented Youth CTY Baltimore USA

11 ProsThose selected receive excellent extra education and probably improved life- chances ConsMay miss youngsters of equal potential. Expensive per student. Not enough; not sustained. OutcomesNo distinct results. Confused by high proportion of well-off students No comparison between programmes. The talent search summary

12 Out-of-School Education for Gifts and Talents 1.The Talent Search 2.Self selection by provision Freeman’s Sports Approach 3.Hard Work 4.Competitions 5.Voluntary provision

13 PrincipleOpen provision and child-led learning enables excellence Predominant countries China, ex-Soviet Union, New Zealand AssumptionsChildren’s interests allied with opportunities enables excellence 2. Self selection by provision

14 Children’s Palaces in China Self selection by provision

15 ProsNo child barred by tests or money Many facilities already available Need not be expensive Freeman’s Sports Approach ConsWithout concerted organisation, provision could be patchy OutcomesDifficult to pin-point, but Far Eastern successes in international competitions are increasingly outstanding Self selection by provision summary

16 Out-of-School Education for Gifts and Talents 1.The Talent Search 2.Self selection by provision Freeman’s Sports Approach 3.Hard Work 4.Competitions 5.Voluntary provision

17 PrincipleSuccess depends on hard work of both child and teacher Predominant countries The Far East, South Korea, Japan, Taiwan AssumptionsEach child starts with similar potential 3. Hard work

18 ProsChild, teacher and parent work together. Supported by research evidence ConsPressure and work-load on the child can be heavy, cutting into creativity and leisure OutcomesEducational surveys show Far Eastern success outstanding Hard work summary

19 Out-of-School Education for Gifts and Talents 1.The Talent Search 2.Self selection by provision Freeman’s Sports Approach 3.Hard Work 4.Competitions 5.Voluntary provision

20 PrincipleVoluntary aim for prizes and prestige Can be inexpensive to run Predominant countries Germany, Eastern Europe, and many other parts of the world. AssumptionsGifts and talents are associated with competitiveness 4. Competitions

21 ProsOpen to all and attractive. Easily controlled and relatively inexpensive ConsNo concern for educational context Requires competitive spirit Non-winners miss out on extra help Standards can vary Outcomes Prizes can improve life chances e.g. in music or chess Competitions summary

22 Out-of-School Education for Gifts and Talents 1.The Talent Search 2.Self selection by provision Freeman’s Sports Approach 3.Hard Work 4.Competitions 5.Voluntary provision

23 PrincipleConcerned adults provide extra education for bright children Predominant countries Everywhere in the world AssumptionsThe official educational system is not providing adequately for the gifted and talented 5. Voluntary provision

24 ProsAccess to activities usually open. A force for positive changes to national systems ConsNot always in concert with schools. Not concerned with children whose parents are not members Provision can be amateur OutcomesQuality and outcomes unknown Voluntary provision summary

25 Where would you send these individuals?

26 We know that high level achievement needs -  Plentiful learning materials  High quality teaching  Plenty of practice  Example to follow  Emotional support  Potential

27 Provision – a holistic approach WESTEAST Avoids the DOMINANCE of ways of thinking

28 Communication – the key WESTEAST International understanding Knowledge sharing Networking Conferences


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