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School Counselors: Partners in Student Achievement.

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Presentation on theme: "School Counselors: Partners in Student Achievement."— Presentation transcript:

1 School Counselors: Partners in Student Achievement

2 Overview The American School Counselor Association (ASCA) has collaborated to create a National Model for School Counseling Programs to connect school counseling with current educational reform movements that emphasize student achievement and success.

3 How we got here… March 2001, ASCA Governing Board passed a motion to develop a National Model June 2001, Summit I met in Tucson, AZ Nov./Dec. 2001, reviewed by school counselors and Summit participants May 2002, Summit II held, in Washington, DC June 2002, Release of ASCA Model at conference

4 Rationale By aligning a counseling program with the school’s mission and school improvement plan, professional school counselors: partner as leaders in systemic change ensure equity and access promote academic, career and personal/ social development for every student

5 Objectives This session reviews the four main components: 1) Foundation 2) Delivery System 3) Management System 4) Accountability

6 “We need to be the change we want to see happen. We are the leaders we have been waiting for.” – Gandhi

7 People have wondered… What do school counselors DO?

8 Historical Problems in School Counseling Programs Lack of legitimization Lack of consistent identity Limited or no involvement in reform movements Variation in roles from state to state and site to site Non-school counselor responsibilities

9 Historical Problems in School Counseling Programs Lack of legitimization Lack of consistent identity Limited or no involvement in reform movements Variation in roles from state to state and site to site Non-school counselor responsibilities

10 Varied and Conflicting Approaches Vocational counselors vs. Mental Health counselors Directive vs. Non-directive Individualized services vs. Comprehensive program Pre-service training varies as do administrative expectations

11 Attempts to Unify the Profession Gysbers & Henderson’s comprehensive programs Johnson & Johnson's results-based guidance Myrick’s planned developmental guidance

12 Historical Problems Have Continued Lack of basic philosophy Poor integration Insufficient student access Inadequate guidance for some students Lack of counselor accountability Failure to utilize other resources Source: From Gatekeeper to Advocate. Transforming the Role of the School Counselor, Hart, P.J. & M. Jacobi (1992)

13 School administrators, parents with special interests, teachers or others may feel their agenda ought to be the school counseling program’s priority. The results often lead to confusion and criticisms when they are disappointed. (Carolyn Maddy Bernstein, 1995) When schools fail to clearly define the counselor’s role...

14 Trends in Education Education reform movement Accountability Standards-based movement High-stakes testing Achievement gap – equity and access Block grants Emphasis on improving school safety Vouchers Performance, not entitlement

15 Current School Counseling Trends ASCA’s National Standards for School Counseling Programs Transforming School Counseling Initiative (Education Trust – Dewitt Wallace) Increased number of state models Results-based school counseling Legislation for school counseling programs ASCA’s National Model

16 When you can’t change the direction of the wind, adjust your sails.

17 The old question was… “What do counselors do?” The new question is… “How are students different because of the school counseling program?

18 From Entitlement… to Performance From a program that: Focuses generally on the number of activities Measures the amount of effort Attends to the process of doing work Works to maintain the existing system To a program that: Focuses on outcomes and improved results Measures impact related to goals Attends to goals, objectives, and outcomes Changes and adapts to be more responsive Source: McGowen, P. & Miller, J., “Changing the Entitlement Culture,” The American School Board Journal, August 1999, p.43

19 From Entitlement… to Performance From counselors who: Focus on good intentions Talk about how hard they work Generally feel little need to change their behavior or approach To counselors who: Focus on accomplishments Talk about effectiveness Know their future rests on accomplishments Communicate goals and objective Source: McGowen, P. & Miller, J., “Changing the Entitlement Culture,” The American School Board Journal, August 1999, p.43

20 Implications What is the purpose of the school counseling program? What are the desired outcomes or results? What is being done to achieve results? What evidence is there that the objectives have been met? Is the program making a difference?

21 School Counseling Programs Are About CounselingManaging Resources LeadershipTeaming AssessmentCollaboration TechnologyData-Driven Decisions Advocacy

22 School Counseling Programs Are About RESULTS. How are students different as a result of the school counseling program?

23 We Exist To Effect Change In Students: Acquire Improve Knowledge Skills Positive Attitude Attendance Behavior Academic Achievement

24 Paradigm Shift From: To: Not only monitoring process and measuring services delivered Focusing also on and measuring the results of our programs and services

25 The time for change isnow… The way we do business must change fundamentally and immediately.

26 ASCA National Model

27 Advocacy Leadership Collaboration Systemic Change

28 Foundation Beliefs and Philosophy Mission Domains: Academic Development Career Development Personal/Social Development ASCA National Standards and Competencies

29 Delivery System School Guidance Curriculum Individual Student Planning Responsive Services System Support

30 Management System Agreements Advisory Council Use of Data –Monitoring Student Progress –Closing the Gap Action Plans –Guidance Curriculum –Closing the Gap Use of Time Calendars

31 Management System Management Agreements Advisory Council Use of Data –Monitoring Student Progress –Closing the Gap Action Plans –Guidance Curriculum –Closing the Gap Use of Time Calendars

32 Accountability Results Reports –Impact Over Time School Counselor Performance Evaluation The Program Audit

33 Academic Development 1.Guidance Curriculum (HS) Developing Academic 4/6 year Plans Promotion/Retention Criteria Organization, Study and Testing Taking Skills Registration, College and High School Graduation Requirements Post High School Options Transition into the Real World

34 Academic Results Goal Setting (K-5) After classroom guidance lessons pre-post tests indicated… 10% to 98%student knowledge of goal setting increased from 10% to 98% 90% 90% achieved their identified goal

35 Personal/Social Results Conflict Resolution (K-5) Number of students who could peacefully resolve a conflict increased 55% to 88% from 55% to 88% 13% 3%Following implementation of a Conflict Manager program the number of suspended students was reduced from 13% in 97/98 to 3% in 01/02.

36 Academic Results Interventions (6-8) After Academic Counseling Groups: 37% of 6 th graders (64) 37% of 6 th graders (64) 24% of 7 th graders (47) 24% of 7 th graders (47) 72% of 8 th graders (46) 72% of 8 th graders (46) Demonstrated GPA improvement

37 Academic Results Interventions (6-8) Students on retention list: 6th - 816th - 81 7th - 737th - 73 8th - 1038th - 103 Students who came off retention list: 6th - 276th - 27 7th - 227th - 22 8th - 238th - 23 72 students avoided retention Pre: Post:

38 increased from 0 to 346At one site the number of students resolving conflicts with the help of peer mediators increased from 0 to 346 increased from 47 to 149At another site, the number who took advantage of peer mediation increased from 47 to 149 Personal/Social Results Conflict Resolution (6-8)

39 Career Development Canyon Springs High School 30 to over 200In the last three years the number of students visiting the career center has increased from 30 to over 200 students per day. 150 to 500Parent attendance at evening guidance events has increased from 150 to 500 parents $750,000 to $825, 000Scholarship dollars for students increased from $750,000 to $825, 000 Finally, graduation rates have improved from 84 % to 89%

40 Next Steps ASCA Rollout of National Model at the Miami Conference with a panel of national experts Multiple training sessions held Draft copy available to everyone Comments and suggestions welcomed Final edition available early 2003

41 All this will not be finished in the first one hundred days. Nor will it be finished in the first thousand days, nor in the life of this administration, nor even perhaps in our lifetime on this planet. – John F. Kennedy But let us begin.

42 Questions? Comments?


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