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© 2009 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved 13-1 Patient Reception Area PowerPoint® presentation to accompany: Medical Assisting Third.

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Presentation on theme: "© 2009 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved 13-1 Patient Reception Area PowerPoint® presentation to accompany: Medical Assisting Third."— Presentation transcript:

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2 © 2009 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved 13-1 Patient Reception Area PowerPoint® presentation to accompany: Medical Assisting Third Edition Booth, Whicker, Wyman, Pugh, Thompson

3 © 2009 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved Identify the elements that are important in a patient reception area Discuss ways to determine what furniture is necessary for a patient reception area and how it should be arranged List the housekeeping tasks and equipment needed for this area of the office. Learning Outcomes

4 © 2009 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved 13-3 Learning Outcomes (cont.) 13.4 Summarize the OSHA regulations that pertain to a patient reception area List the physical components associated with a comfortable and accessible patient reception area List the physical components associated with a safe and secure patient reception area.

5 © 2009 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved 13-4 Learning Outcomes (cont.) 13.7 List the types of reading material appropriate to a patient reception area Describe how modifications to a reception area can accommodate patients with special needs Identify special situations that can affect the arrangement of a reception area.

6 © 2009 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved 13-5 Introduction  Patient reception areas Inviting and functional Special needs of disabled patients Pleasant and well-planned  Successful interaction between patient, doctor, and other medical staff

7 © 2009 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved 13-6 First Impression  The reception area Creates an impression of whether the practice is successful or outdated Windows are not soundproof  Minimize noise and conversation behind them Avoid the term “waiting room”

8 © 2009 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved 13-7 First Impression: Reception Area  Medical office information Business cards of all physicians in office General practice information  Lighting Fairly bright  Avoid trips  Needed for reading  Conveys impression of cleanliness

9 © 2009 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved 13-8  Room temperature Average comfortable temperature If room is too cold or too hot, wait seems longer than it is Geriatric practice  Warmer  Music Calming and soothing in background Choose music based on patient population First Impression: Reception Area

10 © 2009 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved 13-9  Use a group of colors that work well together  Consider the mood you want to create  Items that add a special touch  Items that may interest patients that are waiting Always keep safety in mind when placing items in the reception area. First Impression: Decor

11 © 2009 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved First Impression: Furniture  Seating Firm, comfortable, safe, and easy to get in and out of Washable, fireproof fabric Should contrast with the carpet color  Prevent accidental falls Sufficient to accommodate the number of patients, family members, and friends during a 2-hour time period

12 © 2009 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved First Impression: Furniture (cont.)  Arranging furniture Allow maximum floor space for patient comfort 12 sq. ft. of space / person  Ensuring privacy Placing chairs in corners allows some privacy Interim rooms are great space for private discussions with patients

13 © 2009 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved First Impression: Furniture (cont.)  Accommodating children Child-size chairs and play furniture are needed in pediatric offices Separate reception areas for well and sick or contagious children

14 © 2009 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved A. Yes B. No Imagine that you are working in the reception area of the medical office and most of the patients waiting to be seen are between the ages of 19 and 30. Would it be appropriate to put on a mixture of heavy metal and rap music? If yes, why? If no, why not? Apply Your Knowledge The purpose of the music is to soothe and calm patients. Also, although “most” patients are in this age group, not all are, so this type of music is inappropriate for the reception area. ANSWER: Correct!

15 © 2009 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved The Importance of Cleanliness  Maintain a high standard of cleanliness  Housekeeping Professional service  May need to leave detailed instructions Office staff  Use appropriate antibacterial agents and vacuum Clean daily with emergency cleanups as needed

16 © 2009 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved The Importance of Cleanliness (cont.)  Housekeeping Tasks  Check throughout the day Spot-clean and straighten items Equipment  Vacuums, mops, brooms  Trash bags, cleaning solutions, rags, buckets  Gloves

17 © 2009 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved  Cleaning stains Remove stains quickly by spot-cleaning spills  Removing odors Odors are offensive in a doctor’s office Steps to minimize odors:  Invest in a good ventilation system with charcoal filters  Disinfectant and deodorant sprays are helpful  Display “No Smoking” signs The Importance of Cleanliness (cont.)

18 © 2009 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved  Infectious waste Vomit and blood are infectious wastes Proper cleaning and disposal is required  OSHA regulations Regular cleaning of walls and floors Use of disinfectants to combat bacteria Broken glass must be disposed of using tongs or a brush and dustpan The Importance of Cleanliness (cont.)

19 © 2009 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved A patient is coming to see the physician because of bleeding at the surgical site (right upper thigh). While the patient is waiting in the reception area, the blood gets into the chair cushion of the patient’s seat. What should the medical assistant do in this situation? Apply Your Knowledge ANSWER: Put on gloves and remove the chair from the reception area immediately. Special cleaning procedures based on OSHA guidelines must be followed when handling blood and body fluids.

20 © 2009 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved The Physical Components  Office access Parking arrangements  On-street vs. off-street  Free parking lots improve access Well-lit Entrances  Clearly marked  Wide enough to accommodate wheelchairs and walkers

21 © 2009 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved The Physical Components (cont.)  Safety and security Building exits  Ideally, two exits to outside  Clearly labeled with illuminated red “Exit” signs Smoke detectors  Must sound an alarm by law  Check routinely Security systems  Valuable protection  Office staff should be familiar with the system

22 © 2009 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved Apply Your Knowledge It is not adequate simply to have smoke detectors in a medical office. What responsibility does the office staff have related to smoke detectors? ANSWER: Office staff must routinely check the smoke detectors to be sure they are functioning properly and must know what to do in the event the smoke detector alarm sounds, i.e., how to evacuate patients safely from the building. Good Answer!

23 © 2009 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved Keeping Patients Occupied and Informed MAGAZINES AND BOOKS Select reading materials for both adults and younger children that may be of interest to them. Publications should be screened for medical content. PATIENT INFORMATION PACKETS Office informational packets can inform patients about  The physicians in the medical practice  Billing practices  Insurance processing practices MEDICAL INFORMATION  Medical brochures and pamphlets  Read and validate accuracy before placing them in the reception area  Be aware of content and be prepared to answer questions patients may ask after reading these items BULLETIN BOARD Interesting design with bright colors and bold headlines Bulletin Board Tips  Change at intervals  Do not allow the board to become cluttered  Tailor to patient interest  Display current information  Remove outdated materials as soon as possible

24 © 2009 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved Keeping Patients Occupied and Informed (cont.)  More common in reception areas  Informative health videos  Toys, videos, and books  Avoid balls, jump ropes, and other toys that are disruptive  All toys should be easy to clean  avoid stuffed animals

25 © 2009 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved Apply your Knowledge The medical assistant is responsible for putting reading material, including medical information such as brochures and pamphlets, in the reception area. What should the medical assistant do so? ANSWER: The medical assistant should review all materials with medical information for validity before placing the items in the reception area. Magazines should be checked for medical articles so the office staff is aware of the information.

26 © 2009 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved Patients with Special Needs  Differently abled Patients who are born with or acquire a condition that limits or changes abilities Require special accommodations to perform tasks

27 © 2009 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved Patients with Special Needs (cont.)  Federal civil rights act Prevents discrimination of differently abled individuals with physical or mental handicaps  Medical offices must accommodate special needs of clients by Providing additional space in waiting rooms Making provisions for patients with visual and/or hearing impairments Americans with Disabilities Act

28 © 2009 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved Patients with Special Needs (cont.) Older Americans Act of 1965  Ensures that elderly patients receive the best possible health care regardless of ability to pay  Offices must be sensitive to the needs of elderly patients Chairs that are easy to get into and out of Reading materials with large print Good lighting in reception areas and restrooms

29 © 2009 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved Patients with Special Needs (cont.)  Patients from diverse cultural backgrounds Reception area – reflecting aspects of other cultures  Providing reading material in languages of cultures served  Decorating the office for culturally diverse holidays  Posting signs that are in languages of cultures served

30 © 2009 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved Patients with Special Needs (cont.)  Patients who are highly contagious Protect other patients, especially those who are immunocompromised Separate from other patients in reception area  Take directly to an exam room

31 © 2009 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved A.Speak louder and slower and ask each question of the patient. B.Take the patient to a private area if possible to protect his/her medical information. C.Question the person accompanying the patient instead of the patient. A patient who is blind and hard of hearing enters the medical office for the initial visit. How should the medical assistant obtain the medical information? Apply Your Knowledge ANSWER: Excellent!

32 © 2009 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved In Summary Reception Area Well-planned and pleasant = comfortable experience Special accommodations = welcoming environment Appearance = immediate and lasting impression Temperature, lighting, décor, and cleanliness = perception of practice

33 © 2009 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved Creativity and courage help us know how to reach out and help those with particularly unique needs. ~ Mary H. Allen (From A Daybook for Nurses: Making a Difference Each Day)


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