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© 2011 Autodesk Freely licensed for use by educational institutions. Reuse and changes require a note indicating that content has been modified from the.

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Presentation on theme: "© 2011 Autodesk Freely licensed for use by educational institutions. Reuse and changes require a note indicating that content has been modified from the."— Presentation transcript:

1 © 2011 Autodesk Freely licensed for use by educational institutions. Reuse and changes require a note indicating that content has been modified from the original, and must attribute source content to Autodesk. Education Community Working With Imported Geometry: Importing Geometry from Autodesk® and Non-Native Applications  How to directly import a CAD model into Autodesk® Simulation Multiphysics for analysis  Discussion of the differences in coordinate system orientation for various CAD systems  Use of Autodesk® Inventor® Fusion to import any CAD geometry into Autodesk® Simulation Multiphysics  Use of default meshing

2 © 2011 Autodesk Freely licensed for use by educational institutions. Reuse and changes require a note indicating that content has been modified from the original, and must attribute source content to Autodesk. Education Community Working With Imported Geometry Importing Geometry from Autodesk® and Non-Native Applications Overview  In industry today, CAD solid geometry models are commonly used to design parts and assemblies.  However, analysis is still mostly done by hand, without the use of a finite element analysis tool that can use this CAD geometry directly.  Autodesk® Simulation Multiphysics provides an easy to use tool for these types of analyses from any imported CAD solid model. Section 1 Module 1 Page 1

3 © 2011 Autodesk Freely licensed for use by educational institutions. Reuse and changes require a note indicating that content has been modified from the original, and must attribute source content to Autodesk. Education Community Working With Imported Geometry Importing Geometry from Autodesk® and Non-Native Applications Overview  Finite element analysis multiphysics software packages can provide valuable information about a design:  Reducing the weight  Trying different design options  Estimating fatigue life  Determining resonant frequencies  Locating regions of high stress, strain, or deflection Section 1 Module 1 Page 2

4 © 2011 Autodesk Freely licensed for use by educational institutions. Reuse and changes require a note indicating that content has been modified from the original, and must attribute source content to Autodesk. Education Community Working With Imported Geometry Importing Geometry from Autodesk® and Non-Native Applications Performing a basic stress analysis Section 1 Module 1 Page 3  For a hand analysis of a part, such as the yoke shown, many simplifying assumptions need to be made.  With FEA, such assumptions are eliminated, providing a much more accurate answer.

5 © 2011 Autodesk Freely licensed for use by educational institutions. Reuse and changes require a note indicating that content has been modified from the original, and must attribute source content to Autodesk. Education Community Working With Imported Geometry Importing Geometry from Autodesk® and Non-Native Applications Performing a basic stress analysis Section 1 Module 1 Page 4  The steps for analyzing a part by hand or in FEA are basically the same: 1. Determine the material out of which the part will be made and use those material properties. 2. Determine the magnitude and direction of the load and apply it. 3. Determine how the part will be constrained. 4. Perform the analysis.

6 © 2011 Autodesk Freely licensed for use by educational institutions. Reuse and changes require a note indicating that content has been modified from the original, and must attribute source content to Autodesk. Education Community Working With Imported Geometry Importing Geometry from Autodesk® and Non-Native Applications Finite element analysis  For FEA, the part must also be broken up into small pieces, called “finite elements”, and there are various different shapes of these elements for different purposes.  For solid geometry, the most common shape is brick, which is a six- sided shape resembling a box made out of rods. The other shape is tetrahedral, with four sides.  At the end of each “rod” on the corner of the shape, there is a node. Section 1 Module 1 Page 5

7 © 2011 Autodesk Freely licensed for use by educational institutions. Reuse and changes require a note indicating that content has been modified from the original, and must attribute source content to Autodesk. Education Community Working With Imported Geometry Importing Geometry from Autodesk® and Non-Native Applications Finite element analysis  Loads on the part are applied to the nodes, but most FEA software packages let the user pick a surface, which is easier.  Boundary conditions are a way of constraining the part so it doesn’t “fly away” because of the applied load.  There are six degrees of freedom, three translations and three rotations.  If all six degrees of freedom are constrained, the nodes are said to be “fixed.” Section 1 Module 1 Page 6

8 © 2011 Autodesk Freely licensed for use by educational institutions. Reuse and changes require a note indicating that content has been modified from the original, and must attribute source content to Autodesk. Education Community Working With Imported Geometry Importing Geometry from Autodesk® and Non-Native Applications Notes on CAD models Section 1 Module 1 Page 7  Each CAD system defines their “Top”, “Front” and “Right” views differently, based on the X-Y-Z coordinate system.  For instance, SolidWorks® defines X-Y plane as “Front” and Autodesk Inventor defines it as “Top.”  Autodesk® Simulation Multiphysics follows the naming convention, so the coordinate systems will be altered.

9 © 2011 Autodesk Freely licensed for use by educational institutions. Reuse and changes require a note indicating that content has been modified from the original, and must attribute source content to Autodesk. Education Community Working With Imported Geometry Importing Geometry from Autodesk® and Non-Native Applications CAD model orientation Section 1 Module 1 Page 8 Autodesk® Inventor SolidWorks®

10 © 2011 Autodesk Freely licensed for use by educational institutions. Reuse and changes require a note indicating that content has been modified from the original, and must attribute source content to Autodesk. Education Community Working With Imported Geometry Importing Geometry from Autodesk® and Non-Native Applications Notes on CAD models Section 1 Module 1 Page 9  Autodesk® Simulation Multiphysics works with generic CAD file types, such as IGES and STEP.  Autodesk® Simulation Multiphysics works parametrically with Autodesk® Inventor® and AutoCAD®.  However, if you own a third party CAD software and it is installed, it will link with Autodesk® Simulation Multiphysics and be available as a CAD model import type, such as:  SolidWorks®  Pro/Engineer®  CATIA®  Also, Autodesk® Inventor® Fusion can open almost any CAD file type, whether or not you own it, making this a powerful tool!

11 © 2011 Autodesk Freely licensed for use by educational institutions. Reuse and changes require a note indicating that content has been modified from the original, and must attribute source content to Autodesk. Education Community Working With Imported Geometry Importing Geometry from Autodesk® and Non-Native Applications Summary Section 1 Module 1 Page 10  How to directly import a CAD model into Autodesk® Simulation Multiphysics for analysis  Discussion of the differences in coordinate system orientation for various CAD systems  Use of Autodesk® Inventor® Fusion to import any CAD geometry into Autodesk® Simulation Multiphysics  Use of default meshing  The video will demonstrate how to import a CAD model into Autodesk® Simulation Multiphysics.  The model will be prepared for analysis up through meshing.


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