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Mockingbird Chapter 16 Formidable – causing fear, apprehension, or dread: a formidable opponent. 2. of discouraging or awesome strength, size, difficulty,

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Presentation on theme: "Mockingbird Chapter 16 Formidable – causing fear, apprehension, or dread: a formidable opponent. 2. of discouraging or awesome strength, size, difficulty,"— Presentation transcript:

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2 Mockingbird Chapter 16

3 Formidable – causing fear, apprehension, or dread: a formidable opponent. 2. of discouraging or awesome strength, size, difficulty, etc.; intimidating: a formidable problem. Why they objected to Miss Maudie’s yard was a mystery, heightened in my mind because for someone who spent all the daylight hours outdoors, Miss Maudie’s command of Scripture was formidable. (Lee 213)

4 Profane – adj. - characterized by irreverence or contempt for God or sacred principles or things; irreligious. Not devoted to holy or religious purposes; unconsecrated; secular; unholy. “Local opinion held Mr. Underwood to be an intense, profane little man, whose father in a fey fit of humor christened Braxton Bragg,…” (Lee 209)

5 Conceded - to acknowledge as true, just, or proper; admit: He finally conceded that she was right. 2. to acknowledge (an opponent's victory, score, etc.) before it is officially established: to concede an election before all the votes are counted. “He might have hurt me a little,” Atticus conceded, “but son, you’ll understand folks a little better when you’re older.” (Lee 210)

6 Affirmed - to state or assert positively; maintain as true: to affirm one's loyalty to one's country; He affirmed that all was well. “First day Walter comes back to school’ll be his last,” I affirmed. (Lee 211)

7 Prominent –adj. - standing out so as to be seen easily; conspicuous; particularly noticeable: Her eyes are her most prominent feature. As the county went by us, Jem gave Dill the histories and general attitudes of the more prominent figures: Mr. Tensaw Jones voted the straight Prohibition ticket; Miss Emily Davis dipped snuff in private;… (Lee 212)

8 Elucidate – v. - to make lucid or clear; throw light upon; explain; to provide clarification We asked Miss Maudie to elucidate: she said Miss Stephanie seemed to know so much about the case she might as well be called on to testify. (Lee 213)

9 Affluent – adj. - having an abundance of wealth, property, or other material goods; prosperous; rich: an affluent person. Abounding in anything; abundant. The more affluent chased their food with drugstore Coca-Cola in bulb shaped soda glasses. (Lee 214)

10 Dispel – v. - to drive off in various directions; disperse; dissipate: to dispel the dense fog. To cause to vanish; alleviate There were few women and children among them, which seemed to dispel the holiday mood. (Lee 216)

11 Reminiscent – adj. - awakening memories of something similar; suggestive (usually followed by of): His style of writing is reminiscent of Melville's. The Malcolm County courthouse was faintly reminiscent of Arlington in one respect: the concrete pillars supporting its south roof were too heavy for their light burden. (Lee 216)

12 Veranda – n. - Chiefly South Midland and Southern U.S. a large, open porch, usually roofed and partly enclosed, as by a railing, often extending across the front and sides of a house; gallery. The Colored balcony ran along three walls of the courtroom like a second-story veranda, and from it we could see everything. (Lee 219)

13 Amiable – adj. - having or showing pleasant, good-natured personal qualities; affable: an amiable disposition. 2. friendly; sociable: disposition Judge Taylor looked like most judges I had ever seen: amiable, white- haired, slightly ruddy- faced, he was a man who ran his court with an alarming informality… (Lee 220)

14 Unobtrusive – adj. - inconspicuous, unassertive, or reticent. I found myself in in the middle of the Idler’s Club and made myself as unobtrusive as possible. (Lee 220)

15 Mockingbird Chapter 16 Review your words every night. Use them every day. When you use them, you own them!


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