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New York is the only state other than North Carolina that prosecutes ALL youth as adults when they turn 16. Most states prosecute youth as adults at age.

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Presentation on theme: "New York is the only state other than North Carolina that prosecutes ALL youth as adults when they turn 16. Most states prosecute youth as adults at age."— Presentation transcript:

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2 New York is the only state other than North Carolina that prosecutes ALL youth as adults when they turn 16. Most states prosecute youth as adults at age 18. New York prosecutes year olds as adults for certain crimes. Children as young as 7 can be charged with crimes.

3 For all age groups, Monroe County has the highest incarceration rate of any county in New York State. 16 and 17 year olds in Monroe County are also incarcerated at rates higher than most counties in NYS. Of 16 and 17 year olds arrested in 2010, Monroe County was tied for 12 th highest percentage of youth confined to adult jails and tied for 9 th highest percentage of youth incarcerated in an adult prison out of 62 counties. 1.Community Summit on Race, Race and Criminal/Juvenile Justice Team, Facing Race Embracing Equity: Rochester’s racial equity initiative (May 30, 2013) 2.Criminal Justice Case Processing of Year Olds (January 4, 2013). Department of Criminal Justice Services (DCJS) OJRP

4 CountyPrisonJailProbationOther SentenceNot Convicted Or Adjudicated Total N%N%N%N%N%N% NYC Total Albany Chautauqua Chemung Columbia Cortland Delaware Fulton Greene Lewis Livingston Madison Monroe Onondaga Orleans Schenectady Seneca Sullivan Tioga Warren Wyoming Yates

5 1. Issue Brief #3: Less Guilty by Reason of Adolescence, MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Adolescent Development and Juvenile Justice. Retrieved from: 2. What Makes Delinquent Youths ‘Go Right’? Juvenile Justice: New Models for Reform (2005). John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, 16. Retrieved from: 3. Deborah Yurgelon-Todd, 2000 Brain Development More impulsive behavior, less ability to focus on consequences of behavior. Receptive to intervention and highly capable of change. Teens (left) rely more on the amygdala, while adults (right) rely more on the frontal cortex.

6 1. Criminal Justice Case Processing of Year Olds (January 4, 2013). Department of Criminal Justice Services (DCJS) OJRP 2. Juvenile Justice Annual Update for 2011 (May 15, 2012). New York State Division of Criminal Justice Services (DCJS) Office of Justice Research and Performance year olds 45,692 in ,775 from NYC 17,917 outside of NYC Statewide, 75% are misdemeanors In Monroe county, 73.5% are misdemeanors year olds 723 in from NYC 168 outside of NYC NYC 74% robbery, 2% homicide Outside NYC 77% robbery, 1% homicide

7 1. U.S. Census Bureau (2010). Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristic of New York. Retrieved from:: 2. Criminal Justice Case Processing of Year Olds (January 4, 2013). Department of Criminal Justice Services (DCJS) OJRP 32% of NY state’s total population is Black or Latino. 70% of youth arrested in NYS in 2010 were Black or Latino. 80% of youth sentenced to incarceration in 2010 were Black or Latino.

8 1. Local Correctional Facilities in New York State-2009 County Admissions by Age When Admitted via Advancing a fair and just age of criminal responsibility for youth in New York State (January 2011). NYS Commission of Correction. Prepared by the Governor’s Children’s Cabinet Advisory Board 2. Under Custody Report: Profile of Inmate Population Under Custody on 1/1/2010 via Advancing a fair and just age of criminal responsibility for youth in New York State (January 2011). NYS Department of Correction Services. Prepared by the Governor’s Children’s Cabinet Advisory Board. Adult Jail 7,391 youth under age 18 admitted to NY county jails (excluding NYC) in ,570 youth under age 18 admitted to NYC jails in 2008 – add Advancing a Fair age. On any given day there are on average year olds in New York City jails Adult Prison On January 1, 2010 there were year olds in upstate adult prisons.

9 1. The Fourth Wave: Juvenile Justice Reforms for the Twenty-First Century. National Campaign to Reform State Juvenile Justice Systems, 20. Retrieved from: 2. Criminal Justice Case Processing of Year Olds (January 4, 2013). Department of Criminal Justice Services (DCJS) OJRP 3. Community Summit on Race, Race and Criminal/Juvenile Justice Team, Facing Race Embracing Equity: Rochester’s racial equity initiative (May 30, 2013) National New York State Nationally, youth transferred to the adult system are 33.7% more likely to be re-arrested for a violent crime than youth kept in the juvenile system. 70% of 16- and 17-year olds arrested in NY state in 2006 and sentenced to jail were reconvicted within 5 years.

10 1. Raising the Juvenile Justice Jurisdictional Age: Treating Kids as Kids in New York State’s Justice System (March 2012). The Schyler Center for Analysis and Advocacy. Retrieved from: Robbery Juvenile CourtCriminal Court Percent Re-arrested 67.0%75.9% Percent Re-incarcerated 40.9%56.2% Time to First Re-arrest days456.5 days Re-arrest Rate A study compared NY youth in the adult system to NJ youth who are charged in the juvenile system. The youth in NY’s adult system were 85% more likely to be re-arrested for a violent crime and 44% more likely to be re-arrested for a felony property crime.

11 Keep Youth Out of Adult Prisons. National Juvenile Justice Network. Retrieved from: Higher rates of sexual abuse for youth in adult system. 50% more likely to report being attacked with a weapon than youth in juvenile system. 8 times more likely to commit suicide than youth in juvenile system. Increased risk of being placed in solitary confinement. Youth Safety Youth charged in adult system have higher rates of re-arrest. Public Safety Criminal records resulting from adult prosecution create life- long barriers - making it difficult to be fully active citizens. Healthy Communities

12 Can’t get financial aid Can’t get job Can’t live in public housing How exactly are we helping? Barriers to EmploymentBarriers to Citizenship/Risk of deportationLoss of Housing, for themselves & their familiesLimited Voting RightsDenied College Admission & Educational Loans

13 Henrichson, C. and Levshin, V (2011). Cost-Benefit Analysis of Raising the Age of Juvenile Jurisdiction in North Carolina. Vera Institute of Justice. Juvenile Justice Reform in Connecticut: How Collaboration and Commitment Have Improved Public Safety and Outcomes for Youth. Justice Policy Institute. A North Carolina cost benefit analysis projected a $52.3 million benefit per year: $70.9 million/year cost and $123.1 million in reoccurring benefits over the long term. An analysis of Connecticut’s recent success in raising the age to 18 found cost savings and increased public safety. 2Benefit

14 Community Summit on Race, Race and Criminal/Juvenile Justice Team, Facing Race Embracing Equity: Rochester’s racial equity initiative (May 30, 2013) Criminal Justice Case Processing of Year Olds (January 4, 2013). Department of Criminal Justice Services (DCJS) OJRP Henrichson, C. and Levshin, V (2011). Cost-Benefit Analysis of Raising the Age of Juvenile Jurisdiction in North Carolina. Vera Institute of Justice. Issue Brief #3: Less Guilty by Reason of Adolescence, MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Adolescent Development and Juvenile Justice. Retrieved from: Juvenile Justice Annual Update for 2011 (May 15, 2012). New York State Division of Criminal Justice Services (DCJS) Office of Justice Research and Performance Juvenile Justice Reform in Connecticut: How Collaboration and Commitment Have Improved Public Safety and Outcomes for Youth. Justice Policy Institute. Keep Youth Out of Adult Prisons. National Juvenile Justice Network. Retrieved from: adult-prisons. Local Correctional Facilities in New York State-2009 County Admissions by Age When Admitted via Advancing a fair and just age of criminal responsibility for youth in New York State (January 2011). NYS Commission of Correction. Prepared by the Governor’s Children’s Cabinet Advisory Board Raising the Juvenile Justice Jurisdictional Age: Treating Kids as Kids in New York State’s Justice System (March 2012). The Schyler Center for Analysis and Advocacy. Retrieved from: State Trends: Legislative Victories from 2005 to 2010 Removing Youth from the Adult Criminal Justice Syst. Campaign for Youth Justice. The Fourth Wave: Juvenile Justice Reforms for the Twenty-First Century. National Campaign to Reform State Juvenile Justice Systems, 20. Retrieved from: U.S. Census Bureau (2010). Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristic of New York. Retrieved from:: Under Custody Report: Profile of Inmate Population Under Custody on 1/1/2010 via Advancing a fair and just age of criminal responsibility for youth in New York State (January 2011). NYS Department of Correction Services. Prepared by the Governor’s Children’s Cabinet Advisory Board. What Makes Delinquent Youths ‘Go Right’? Juvenile Justice: New Models for Reform (2005). John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, 16. Retrieved from:

15 Complete a form indicating the ways in which you would like to support Raise The Age NY! Tweet “I support #RaiseTheAgeNY” Together we WILL dismantle the cradle to prison pipeline! For more information, contact Beth Powers: or


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