Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Chapter Sixteen Reconstruction: High Hopes and Shattered Dreams, 1865-1877.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Chapter Sixteen Reconstruction: High Hopes and Shattered Dreams, 1865-1877."— Presentation transcript:

1 Chapter Sixteen Reconstruction: High Hopes and Shattered Dreams, 1865-1877

2 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.16-2 Berkin, Making America Chapter 16 A major example of Abraham Lincoln's policy of leniency toward the defeated South is provided by his 1. willingness to have the federal government assume responsibility for all debts incurred by the government of the Confederacy. 2. choice of a southerner as his vice president in the 1864 election. 3. offer to consider revoking the Emancipation Proclamation. 4. decision that a state government could be organized after only 10 percent of the voters took an oath of loyalty to the Union.

3 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.16-3 Berkin, Making America Chapter 16 A major example of Abraham Lincoln's policy of leniency toward the defeated South is provided by his 4. decision that a state government could be organized after only 10 percent of the voters took an oath of loyalty to the Union. Hint: This so-called Ten-Percent Plan also included a requirement that slavery be abolished in each reconstructed state’s constitution. See pages 460– 461.

4 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.16-4 Berkin, Making America Chapter 16 The Thirteenth Amendment 1. stripped many leaders of the Confederacy of their citizenship. 2. barred the president from defining how southern states could reenter the Union. 3. was necessary because the Emancipation Proclamation had not abolished slavery everywhere. 4. was later repealed by the Fifteenth Amendment.

5 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.16-5 Berkin, Making America Chapter 16 The Thirteenth Amendment 3. was necessary because the Emancipation Proclamation had not abolished slavery everywhere. Hint: On the day that it went into effect, the Emancipation Proclamation ended slavery only in states still in rebellion. See page 458.

6 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.16-6 Berkin, Making America Chapter 16 Sharecropping arose because 1. many southerners, white as well as black, had no means of acquiring land. 2. the Freedmen's Bureau advised people that it would lead to land ownership in the not-too- distant future. 3. the government provided loans that made it possible for poor farmers to become landowners. 4. Southern banks lent money on easy terms to anyone who agreed to become a sharecropper.

7 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.16-7 Berkin, Making America Chapter 16 Sharecropping arose because 1. many southerners, white as well as black, had no means of acquiring land. Hint: Unable to buy land, they rented a plot of land and paid the owner a share of the crop they grew. See page 467.

8 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.16-8 Berkin, Making America Chapter 16 Black codes were enacted 1. by Radical Republicans in Congress to punish the Deep South. 2. to force African Americans into a legally subordinate position in southern society. 3. during Black Reconstruction in order to protect former slaves from abuse. 4. under the terms of the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution.

9 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.16-9 Berkin, Making America Chapter 16 Black codes were enacted 2. to force African Americans into a legally subordinate position in southern society. Hint: Southern legislatures enacted these laws in order to restrain African Americans in a variety of ways and to assure a ready supply of labor. See pages 468–469.

10 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.16-10 Berkin, Making America Chapter 16 In the aftermath of emancipation, freedmen 1. quickly undertook to establish schools and churches. 2. tried to emigrate en masse to the North. 3. hoped to return to their ancestral lands in Africa. 4. by and large stayed with and continued to work for their former masters.

11 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.16-11 Berkin, Making America Chapter 16 In the aftermath of emancipation, freedmen 1. quickly undertook to establish schools and churches. Hint: See pages 463–466.

12 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.16-12 Berkin, Making America Chapter 16 Radical Republicans in Congress advocated all of the following except 1. an equal distribution of wealth to all Americans. 2. immediate emancipation. 3. civil liberties for freedmen. 4. full citizenship for former slaves.

13 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.16-13 Berkin, Making America Chapter 16 Radical Republicans in Congress advocated all of the following except 1. an equal distribution of wealth to all Americans. Hint: This is the correct choice. Because Radical Republicans did not insist on land redistribution when Congress took control of Reconstruction, sharecropping emerged. See pages 466–467.

14 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.16-14 Berkin, Making America Chapter 16 All of the following statements about Andrew Johnson are correct except 1. he was a southerner who remained loyal to the Union. 2. he agreed with the Radicals about Reconstruction and the future of former slaves. 3. he disliked the southern planter elite. 4. he was to strengthen the white middle class in the South.

15 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.16-15 Berkin, Making America Chapter 16 All of the following statements about Andrew Johnson are correct except 2. he agreed with the Radicals about Reconstruction and the future of former slaves. Hint: Because this statement is not true, it is the correct choice. He did not agree with Radical Reconstruction, instead favoring the formula proposed by Lincoln, and he believed that the freedmen should be subordinate to white southerners. See pages 462–463.

16 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.16-16 Berkin, Making America Chapter 16 By removing Edwin Stanton as secretary of war, Andrew Johnson 1. successfully reasserted the concept of separation of powers. 2. had to face the possibility of removal from office. 3. was then able to remove the popular Ulysses Grant as general-in-chief. 4. violated the Civil Rights Act of 1866.

17 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.16-17 Berkin, Making America Chapter 16 By removing Edwin Stanton as secretary of war, Andrew Johnson 2. had to face the possibility of removal from office. The House impeached him, but the Senate failed to remove him from office by one vote. See pages 472–473.

18 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.16-18 Berkin, Making America Chapter 16 The congressional Reconstruction amendments to the Constitution did not 1. address the issue of the right of African Americans to vote. 2. extend the Bill of Rights to the states. 3. prohibit disenfranchisement on the basis of sex. 4. settle the issue of citizenship for African Americans.

19 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.16-19 Berkin, Making America Chapter 16 The congressional Reconstruction amendments to the Constitution did not 3. prohibit disenfranchisement on the basis of sex. Hint: Neither the Fourteenth nor the Fifteenth Amendments addressed the issue of the women’s vote. See pages 471–475.

20 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.16-20 Berkin, Making America Chapter 16 The term “New Departure Democrats” describes 1. northern Democrats who opposed Radical Reconstruction. 2. southern Democrats who accommodated themselves to black suffrage and emancipation. 3. freedmen who supported the southern Democratic Party. 4. northern Republicans who often voted with southern Democrats in Congress.

21 Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.16-21 Berkin, Making America Chapter 16 The term “New Departure Democrats” describes 2. southern Democrats who accommodated themselves to black suffrage and emancipation. Hint: They decided to accept these new realities in order to bring an end to federal involvement in their states under Radical Reconstruction. See pages 479–480.


Download ppt "Chapter Sixteen Reconstruction: High Hopes and Shattered Dreams, 1865-1877."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google